How Much Energy Goes Into Making a Bottle of Water

first_img Perception, Status and Bottled Water Explore further Citation: How Much Energy Goes Into Making a Bottle of Water? (2009, March 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-03-energy-bottle.html Researchers have calculated that the energy required to produce bottled water is up to 2,000 times more than the energy required to produce tap water. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons. (PhysOrg.com) — Most people who buy bottled water have access to clean drinking water virtually for free (in the US, tap water costs less than a penny per gallon, on average). Nevertheless, the consumption of bottled water continues to grow, far surpassing the US sales of milk and beer, and second only to soft drinks.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Since world consumption of bottled water has increased by 70% since 2001 to 200 billion liters in 2007, some people have become concerned about the environmental, economical, and social impacts of bottled water. In a recent study, researchers Peter Gleick and Heather Cooley from the Pacific Institute in Oakland, California, have estimated the energy required to produce bottled water, including the energy required to manufacture plastic, fabricate the plastic into bottles, process the water, fill and seal the bottles, transport the bottles, and chill the bottles for use.Combining all the energy input totals, Gleick and Cooley found that producing bottled water requires between 5.6 and 10.2 million joules of energy per liter, depending on transportation factors (a typical personal-sized water bottle is about 0.5 liters). That’s up to 2,000 times the energy required to produce tap water, which costs about 0.005 million joules per liter for treatment and distribution. In 2007, US consumers purchased more than 33 billion liters of bottled water, or 110 liters (30 gallons) per person. The total energy required to produce 33 billion liters is equivalent to 32-54 million barrels of oil (although not all the energy used comes from oil). Energy to produce bottled water accounts for about one-third of one percent of total US energy consumption.To break down the energy requirements, Gleick and Cooley found that producing the plastic bottles and transporting the bottles greatly dominated the energy input. Most single-use plastic water bottles are made out of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), recognized in the US by the recycling code “1” imprinted on the bottle. Large containers are more likely made of polycarbonate, which requires about 40% more energy to produce than bottle-grade PET. Although some companies are experimenting with producing lightweight bottles, the researchers calculated that the manufacturing cost of PET is about 4 million joules of energy per typical 1-liter PET bottle weighing 38 grams, and the cap weighing 2 grams. Even though using recycled materials could lead to some energy savings, almost all plastic bottles for water are currently made from virgin PET. “Our previous work had suggested that bottled water production was an energy-intensive process, but we were surprised to see that the energy equivalent of nearly 17 million barrels of oil are required to produce the PET bottles alone,” Cooley told PhysOrg.com.Transportation costs vary depending on the distance and mode of transport, and both factors depend on the type of bottled water. There are two main kinds of bottled water in the US: “spring water,” which comes from an underground spring, and accounts for 56% of US sales; and “purified water,” which is municipal tap water that has received further treatment, and accounts for 44% of US sales. Spring water can only be derived from certain locations, while purified water can be produced locally. (In the US, Nestlé is the largest producer of spring water, while Coca-Cola (Dasani), Pepsi (Aquafina) and Nestlé (Pure Life) account for most of the country’s purified water sales.)In their analysis, Gleick and Cooley evaluated three different transportation scenarios, and calculated the energy requirements per liter of bottled water. For purified water distributed locally by truck within Los Angeles, the total transportation energy is about 1.4 million joules per liter. In the second situation, spring water shipped from Fiji (such as Fiji Spring Water) across the Pacific to Los Angeles, and then delivered locally by truck, requires about 4 million joules per liter for transportation. Third, spring water transported by truck from French springs (such as Evian) to French sea ports, then shipped across the Atlantic, transported by train from the east coast to Los Angeles, and then delivered locally by truck has a transportation energy cost of about 5.8 million joules per liter. For the two spring water scenarios, the transportation energy equaled (in the case of Fiji) or exceeded (in the case of France) the energy required to produce the bottle.The energy required for processing, bottling, sealing, labeling, and refrigeration were much smaller than the energy for making the bottles and transporting them. With this data, the researchers hope that future studies will have the ability to make specific estimates for different scenarios, and possibly find ways to cut energy costs.“With the US consumption of bottled water exceeding 33 billion liters a year, and with intensifying efforts to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, these data should help identify ways to reduce the energy costs of bottled water and may help consumers themselves make more environmentally sustainable choices,” Cooley said.More information: Gleick, P.H. and Cooley, H.S. “Energy implications of bottled water.” Environmental Research Letters 4 (2009) 014009 (6pp).Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.last_img read more

United States China team explore energy harvesting

first_imgCredit: ACS Nano More information: Ultrathin, Rollable, Paper-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Acoustic Energy Harvesting and Self-Powered Sound Recording ACS Nano, Article ASAP, Publication Date (Web): March 19, 2015. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.5b00618 Six authors have described their work in harvesting energy in a paper titled “Ultrathin, Rollable, Paper-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Acoustic Energy Harvesting and Self-Powered Sound Recording.” Translation: A paper microphone may help charge your cellphone. Jacob Aron in New Scientist wrote about their work; he said one benefit of such a microphone is that it could harvest acoustic energy to top up a phone charge on the go. The team, from the Georgia Institute of Technology in the U.S. and Chongqing University and Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China, published their paper in ACS Nano last month. Explore further Device captures energy from walking to recharge wireless gadgets Journal information: ACS Nanocenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2015 Tech Xplore The scientists developed a rollable, paper-based triboelectric nanogenerator with 125 μm thickness. It can deliver maximum power density of 121 mW/m2 and 968 W/m3 under a sound pressure of 117 dBSPL. (The amount of power the microphone provides depends on its size, but it’s around 121 milliwatts per square meter.)What is a nanogenerator? Interviewed last year by Paul Weiss, Zhong Lin Wang of Georgia Tech said: “A nanogenerator is a device that utilizes piezoelectrics, triboelectrics, or paraelectrics, or all three of them, to convert mechanical action, thermal action, or other action into electricity for powering small electronic devices, mostly by converting mechanical energy.” As for the triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG), he explained that this uses the electrostatic charge “created due to the triboelectrification process as a driving force for electron flow to an external load. Using this process today, we can achieve 55 percent energy conversion efficiency, the best so far.”Again, Aron translated what Zhong Wang of the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta and colleagues actually did to their paper. “They used a laser to zap a grid of microscopic holes in the paper, then coated one side in copper and laid it on top of a thin sheet of Teflon, joining the two sheets at one edge. Sound waves vibrate the two sheets in different ways, causing them to come in and out of contact. This generates an electric charge, similar to the one made when your rub a balloon on your hair, which can charge a phone slowly.”The microphone is the size of a postage stamp. Aron said, “The amount of power the microphone provides depends on its size, but it’s around 121 milliwatts per square meter. ‘It can be made into any size you like,’ says Wang, though he admits a stamp-sized microphone fitted to your phone would only provide a small amount of power rather than fully charging your phone.”The authors of the paper said it can be implemented onto a commercial cell phone for acoustic energy harvesting from human talking. Aron, meanwhile, also wrote about another potential application—the recycling of sound energy from the environment, where one could get “free electricity from the ‘waste’ sounds all around us.”The authors said the concept and design could be applied to a variety of circumstances for energy harvesting or sensing purposes. Some examples they gave would be toward wearable and flexible electronics, military surveillance, jet engine noise reduction, a low-cost implantable human ear and wireless technology applications.Via NewScientist Citation: United States, China team explore energy harvesting (2015, April 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-04-states-china-team-explore-energy.htmllast_img read more

High levels of black carbon found at remote site in Siberia

first_img Explore further Credit: CC0 Public Domain The Arctic is especially sensitive to black carbon emissions from within the region (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from Sweden, the U.S., Russia, Norway and Austria has found higher than expected levels of black carbon at a remote test site in Siberia. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes the amount of black carbon they found and its sources. Citation: High levels of black carbon found at remote site in Siberia (2017, January 31) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-01-high-black-carbon-remote-site.html More information: Patrik Winiger et al. Siberian Arctic black carbon sources constrained by model and observation, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2017). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1613401114AbstractBlack carbon (BC) in haze and deposited on snow and ice can have strong effects on the radiative balance of the Arctic. There is a geographic bias in Arctic BC studies toward the Atlantic sector, with lack of observational constraints for the extensive Russian Siberian Arctic, spanning nearly half of the circum-Arctic. Here, 2 y of observations at Tiksi (East Siberian Arctic) establish a strong seasonality in both BC concentrations (8 ng⋅m−3 to 302 ng⋅m−3) and dual-isotope–constrained sources (19 to 73% contribution from biomass burning). Comparisons between observations and a dispersion model, coupled to an anthropogenic emissions inventory and a fire emissions inventory, give mixed results. In the European Arctic, this model has proven to simulate BC concentrations and source contributions well. However, the model is less successful in reproducing BC concentrations and sources for the Russian Arctic. Using a Bayesian approach, we show that, in contrast to earlier studies, contributions from gas flaring (6%), power plants (9%), and open fires (12%) are relatively small, with the major sources instead being domestic (35%) and transport (38%). The observation-based evaluation of reported emissions identifies errors in spatial allocation of BC sources in the inventory and highlights the importance of improving emission distribution and source attribution, to develop reliable mitigation strategies for efficient reduction of BC impact on the Russian Arctic, one of the fastest-warming regions on Earth.center_img © 2017 Phys.org Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Black carbon consists of carbon particles that are small enough to become airborne. One such example is soot sent into the air from burning coal. It is not a greenhouse gas, but does contribute to global warming via another means. It lands on top of snow, and because it is black, absorbs heat from the sun, which causes two problems—one is that some of that in the northern latitudes, which would normally be reflected back into the atmosphere, remains on the ground. The other is that it contributes to higher than normal snow melt. In this new effort, the research team ventured into a remote part of Siberia to gather statistics on black carbon levels, because it is one of the few northern places left on Earth where data regarding its presence is not regularly collected.The team set up a research station just outside of the town of Tiksi and immediately began monitoring the amount of black carbon that landed on its sensors. They report that they found more than was expected and that it was coming from an unexpected source. The biggest source, they found, was automobile exhaust, which was surprising because there is very little automobile traffic in Siberia. They suggest it likely traveled from more populous places in Europe, Russia and China. Before arriving at the site, the researchers had suspected that the biggest source would be gas flares caused by the oil industry, which are common in Siberia.The researchers were able to identify the source of the black carbon by looking at its isotopic fingerprint—different sources produce different isotopes. Regular black soot, for example, has very little carbon 14. Such testing revealed that coal burning was the second largest source of black carbon in the region, though they noted things changed by season—during the summer, burning biomass was the biggest source.The researchers suggest that it is important that all sources of climate change be accounted for if accurate predictions and models are to be made—a critical factor for figuring out how to reverse what is occurring. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Canadian ice core samples show Holocene temperatures were higher than today

first_imgThe Antarctic ice sheet. Credit: Stephen Hudson / Wikipedia This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Prior evidence has shown that global warming is happening in different degrees in different parts of the world, and that the biggest changes are occurring in the Arctic. As the planet warms, scientists look for examples from the past to predict what might happen in the future. In this new effort, the researchers report that temperatures at the end of the last ice age (8,000 to 11,000 years ago) were slightly warmer than they are today, which suggests that other studies might show the impact that such high temperatures had on the rest of the planet.The ice cores were taken from the Agassiz ice cap on Ellesmere Island several decades ago, but were not thoroughly examined due to budget constraints. They now reside at a site on the University of Alberta campus, which allowed the team access for study. The cores came from depths as much as a kilometer, offering a look into the distant past. The researchers measured ice that had melted and subsequently refroze and oxygen isotopes to learn more about air conditions during the time of their formation. The team reports that they found matching results from the two measuring methods, which strengthens their findings. They also report that overall, their findings offer more evidence of global warming which, they suggest, is most certainly due to human factors—natural factors, such as those that led to a warmer world during the Holocene (variations in the Earth’s orbit and tilt) occur at a much slower rate.The researchers suggest more research be done to look for changes wrought by the warmer conditions during the Holocene, both in the Arctic and other parts of the world, to predict what changes might be ahead. Explore further More information: Benoit S. Lecavalier et al. High Arctic Holocene temperature record from the Agassiz ice cap and Greenland ice sheet evolution, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2017). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1616287114AbstractWe present a revised and extended high Arctic air temperature reconstruction from a single proxy that spans the past ∼12,000 y (up to 2009 CE). Our reconstruction from the Agassiz ice cap (Ellesmere Island, Canada) indicates an earlier and warmer Holocene thermal maximum with early Holocene temperatures that are 4–5 °C warmer compared with a previous reconstruction, and regularly exceed contemporary values for a period of ∼3,000 y. Our results show that air temperatures in this region are now at their warmest in the past 6,800–7,800 y, and that the recent rate of temperature change is unprecedented over the entire Holocene. The warmer early Holocene inferred from the Agassiz ice core leads to an estimated ∼1 km of ice thinning in northwest Greenland during the early Holocene using the Camp Century ice core. Ice modeling results show that this large thinning is consistent with our air temperature reconstruction. The modeling results also demonstrate the broader significance of the enhanced warming, with a retreat of the northern ice margin behind its present position in the mid Holocene and a ∼25% increase in total Greenland ice sheet mass loss (∼1.4 m sea-level equivalent) during the last deglaciation, both of which have implications for interpreting geodetic measurements of land uplift and gravity changes in northern Greenland. (Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has examined ice cores taken from an island in northern Canada in the 1980s and found that air temperatures during the Holocene were higher than today. Further, there have been unprecedented air temperature changes in the area over the past half-century. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of the cores and why they believe it may help better understand what might happen to our planet due to global warming.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Reconciling differences in interpretations of global warming hiatus Citation: Canadian ice core samples show Holocene temperatures were higher than today (2017, May 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-canadian-ice-core-samples-holocene.html © 2017 Phys.orglast_img read more

3D printing electrically assisted nacreinspired structures with selfsensing capabilities

first_img , Advanced Healthcare Materials Materials theory combines strength, stiffness and toughness of composites into a single design map Citation: 3-D printing electrically assisted, nacre-inspired structures with self-sensing capabilities (2019, April 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-d-electrically-nacre-inspired-self-sensing-capabilities.html Proof-of-principle self-sensing capability of 3D printed, nacre-inspired helmet on a mini Lego bicycle rider. 3-D printed helmet with 2 wt% aGN (aligned graphene nanoplatelets), LED light is ON. Brightness decreases with crack deflection during compressive tests and resistance increases (RC circuit). When resistance increases due to crack propagation the LED turns off. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aau9490 , Science © 2019 Science X Network The 3D-printing process. (A) Nacre model by SolidWorks (from Dassault Systèmes), sliced using the DMD-based stereolithography software to generate projection patterns. (B) rGNs are aligned by the electric field (blue dotted arrow shows the direction) to form aGNs during the 3D-printing process, the aligned composites solidify after light exposure (yellow part), the alignment of GNs is kept in the composites, after the layer is complete the building plate is peeled to print additional layers with aGNs. (C) Compression of natural nacre and SEM images of the fracture surface, showing crack deflection (yellow arrowheads) and crack branching (red arrowheads) in (D) and crack deflection between layers in (E). (F) 3D-printed nacre with 2 wt % aGNs under loading with crack deflection and branching in (G). (H) SEM image showing deflection between layers (yellow arrowheads). Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aau9490. To align the GNs in the composite during layer-based 3-D printing, Yang et al. used an electric field (433 V/cm) to build nacre-inspired MJ/GN composite structures. The scientists applied DC voltages, followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) collection, optical imaging and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images to characterize (i.e. test) the newly developed composites. The resulting parallel and closely packed GN sample layers were structurally separated by the polymer matrix in between as mortar to impart the critical structural features for mechanical performance in the 3-D synthetic nacre. The scientists saw similarities between the synthetic vs. natural nacre structure at the macro- and microscale. Prior to 3-D printing, Yang et al. created the nacre model using SolidWorks software first, and then sliced it with in-house developed digital micromirror device (DMD)-based stereolithography software to generate surface patterns. They projected masked images of the computed patterns on the resin surface to construct layers in which the electrically assisted 3-D printing process aligned and selectively polymerized the programmed parts for specific reinforcement orientation, layer upon each layer of the MJ/GN composites to create the structure of interest. The scientists formed the desired gap between the GN alignment in the MJ resin, prior to photocuration using the DMD light projection system (3.16 mW/cm2) available in the setup. LEFT: Mechanical property and microstructure study of 3D-printed nacre. (A) Comparison of compression properties of the 3D-printed nacre with different loadings and alignments. (B) Crack propagation in MJ/rGNs nacre with the breaking of rGNs. (C and F) Simulations of stress distribution of MJ/rGNs and MJ/aGNs by COMSOL Multiphysics, respectively. (D) Comparison of maximum compression load for the 3D-printed nacre with different mass ratios of GNs. (E) Crack deflection of MJ/aGNs nacre and bridging and interlocking of aGNs. RIGHT: Comparison of fracture toughness by three-point bending test. (A to C) Compression force versus resistance change for pure MJ, MJ/2 wt % rGNs, and MJ/2 wt % aGNs, respectively (with inset SEM images showing the related fracture surfaces). (D) Comparison of fracture toughness for crack initiation (KIC) and stable crack propagation (KJC) of the 3D-printed nacre with the natural nacre. (E) Comparison of specific toughness and specific strength of the 3D-printed nacre with others’ work (inset shows the specific strength with density for various nacre-inspired composites). R-curves of the 3D-printed nacre (F) and the natural nacre (G). Simulations of stress distribution by COMSOL Multiphysics for the 3D-printed nacre with rGNs (H) and aGNs (I). Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aau9490. Explore further Journal information: Science Advances They then compared the stress-strain behavior of the 3-D printed nacre with rGNs (random) and aGNs (aligned) for different ratios. Compared to natural nacre, the synthetic version showed typical brittle fractures with crack propagation at first. Yang et al. used structural simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics to show the site of stress concentration and the importance of accurate GN alignment for crack deflection and energy dissipation in the synthetic nacres. When they conducted structural simulations of optimized aGN sheets with 2 percent weight in the study (2 wt %), they showed the formation of bridges that lead to stress distribution at the joint area between the aGNs and polymer matrix to carry loads instead of promoting macroscopic crack advancement. The structures contained covalent bonding, hydrogen bonding and π-π interaction to synergistically bridge the aGNs for enhanced biomechanical properties. To test the mechanical properties, the scientists conducted three-point bending tests to measure the toughness of 3-D printed composites with rGNs, aGNs and a reference pure polymer sample. After adequate GN alignment they obtained stable crack arrest and deflection comparable to natural nacre, by toughening the brick-like platelets. The results indicated resistance to fracture during crack growth for aGNs. The nacre-inspired aGN composites showed bridging and interlocking that translated to an increase in dissipated energy and toughening, contributing to the outstanding crack arrest performance of the composite. The synthetic 3-D nacre was more lightweight than natural nacre, with lower density compared to the previous synthetic composites. The 3-D synthetic version showed significantly improved electrical conductivity contrary to natural nacre, which Yang et al. tested using piezoresistive responses useful for self-sensing military and sports applications. As a proof-of-principle, the scientists designed a wearable 3-D helmet for a Lego bicycle rider using the technique to study its self-sensing capability. The helmet composed of aGNs showed improved impact and compression resistance compared with rGNs, verified with impact tests where the rGN helmets broke while the aGN helmets retained their shapes. Yang et al. showed that a helmet composed with aGNs (0.36 g) connected to an LED light was able to sustain the impact of an iron ball 305 times its weight (110 g), where the brightness of the LED light only decreased slightly after the impact due to crack formation, energy dissipation and increased resistance. center_img 3D-printed smart helmet with anisotropic electrical property. (A) Anisotropic electrical property of the 3D-printed nacre. (B) Changes of electrical resistance with different GNs loadings and alignments. (C) Schematic diagram showing the layered polymer/GNs structure with anisotropic electrical resistance. (D) 3D-printing process of a self-sensing smart helmet. Demonstration of the wearable sensor on a Lego bicycle rider showing different self-sensing properties for the 3D-printed helmets with rGNs (E) and aGNs (F). (G) Circuit design for the tests. Compression force of the 3D-printed helmets with related compression displacements and resistance changes for rGNs (H) and aGNs (I), respectively. (Photo credit: Yang Yang, Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Southern California.). Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aau9490. Schematic diagram of the electrically assisted 3D-printing platform for the construction of nacre-inspired structures. (A) Diagram of the electrically assisted 3D-printing device. (B) Illustration of the bottom-up projection-based stereolithography process. (C and D) Schematic diagrams show the alignment of GNs under the electric field and alignment mechanisms, respectively. (E) 3D-printed nacre with aGNs and SEM images showing surface and cross-section morphology: DMD, digital micromirror device; PDMS, polydimethylsiloxane. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aau9490 More information: Yang Yang et al. Electrically assisted 3-D printing of nacre-inspired structures with self-sensing capability, Science Advances (2019). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aau9490 L. J. Bonderer et al. Bioinspired Design and Assembly of Platelet Reinforced Polymer Films, Science (2008). DOI: 10.1126/science.1148726 Shanshan Yao et al. Nanomaterial-Enabled Wearable Sensors for Healthcare, Advanced Healthcare Materials (2017). DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700889 K. J. Koester et al. The true toughness of human cortical bone measured with realistically short cracks, Nature Materials (2008). DOI: 10.1038/nmat2221 The scientists constructed a resistor-capacitor (RC) circuit to measure the changing resistance during the impact and during compression tests. In the rGN helmet the LED was always off due to the larger resistance, comparatively the smaller resistance of the aGN helmet left the LED light turned on. In this way, Yang et al. showed how the nano-laminated architecture provided extrinsic toughening and enhanced electrical conductivity due to bioinspired, aligned GNs in the nanocomposites. They propose to enable mass customization, assisted with 3-D printing capabilities to translate the lightweight smart materials ingrained with excellent mechanical and electrical properties for commercially viable applications in widespread industries. Nacre, also known as mother of pearl is a composite, organic-inorganic material produced in nature in the inner shell layer of molluscs and the outer coating of pearls. The material is resilient and iridescent with high strength and toughness, resulting from its brick-and-mortar-like architecture. Lightweight and strong materials are of interest in materials science due to their potential in multidisciplinary applications in sports, aerospace, transportation and biomedicine. In a recent study, now published in Science Advances, Yang Yang and co-workers at the interdisciplinary departments of Systems Engineering, Chemical, Biomedical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Southern California, developed a route to build nacre-inspired hierarchical structures with complex 3-D shapes via electrically assisted 3-D printing. The scientists propose to develop a smart helmet with inbuilt protective, self-sensing capabilities using the electrically assisted 3-D printing process. The bioinspired brick and mortar (BM) architecture can enhance mechanical strength and electrical conduction by aligning graphene nanoplatelets in each layer for maximum performance via crack deflection under loading. In total, Yang et al. aim to engineer multifunctional, lightweight yet strong and electrically self-sensing 3-D structures from the lab to industry. To replicate the challenging hierarchical, micro-/nano-scale architecture of natural nacre, the scientists used aGNs in a photocurable polymer, grafted with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) to strengthen the interface and load transfer at the sandwich-like polymer matrix. For the photocurable resin, they used G+ resin from Maker Juice Labs, notated MJ, containing high tensile epoxy diacrylate, glycol diacrylate and a photoinitiator with excellent mechanical properties and low viscosity. , Nature Materials In the present work, Yang et al. presented an electrically assisted 3-D printing method using aligned graphene nanoplatelets (GNs) in photocurable resin to build the nacre-inspired hierarchical architectures. The proposed technique took advantage of the nanoscale-to-microscale assembly induced by the electric field and microscale-to-macroscale assembly via 3-D printing. The 3-D architectures with aligned GNs (aGNs) showed reinforced mechanical properties compared to random GNs (rGNs). The 3-D printed artificial nacre displayed specific toughness and strength comparable to natural nacre, with additional anisotropic electric properties unlike the natural nacre. To create a brick-and-mortar-like structure in the work, they aligned graphene nanoplatelets (GNs) as bricks in the electric field (433 V/cm) during 3-D printing and included the polymer matrix as a mortar. The bioinspired 3-D printed nacre with aligned GNs (2 percent weight) were lightweight (1.06 g/cm3), albeit with specific toughness and strength similar to the natural nacre counterpart. The 3-D printed lightweight, smart armor aligned GNs could sense surface damage to exert resistance change during electrical applications. The study highlighted interesting possibilities for bioinspired nanomaterials with hierarchical architecture tested in a proof-of-principle, mini smart helmet. Projected applications include integrated mechanical reinforcement, electrical self-sensing capabilities in biomedicine, aerospace engineering as well as military and sports appliances. Lightweight and strong structural materials such as multifunctional wearable sensors have attracted increasing attention in health monitoring, but most piezoelectric sensors are soft and cannot protect the surface of interest. A protective, multifunctional wearable sensor is currently in demand for military and sports applications therefore. The hierarchical structure of nacre in nature provides superior mechanical performance, notwithstanding its relatively weak constituents to protect the soft body in molluscs. The secret to its protective capability is inherent to its brick and mortar (BM) architecture that ranges from the nano- and micro- to macroscale. This outstanding materials property formed the basis to design light and strong armor for microstructural interfaces in materials science. Although traditional, bottom-up assembly processes such as vacuum filtration, spray coating, ice templating and self-assembly were previously studied intensively to build nacre-inspired architectures, the methods only focused on two-dimensional (2-D) thin-film formation or simple bulk structures. Since it is challenging to use these techniques to develop 3-D architectures – 3-D printing (additive manufacture) is a powerful alternative. Recent studies in materials science and bioengineering have used 3-D printing with shear forces, magnetic and acoustic fields to form reinforced composites with aligned fibers. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Of crafts and craftsmen

first_imgIt was an evening which brought together a heady mix of beauty with brains, usually a rarity. Aptly called Apne Desh Ko Jano – know you country, the event centered upon the Indian handicrafts industry and its workings. Hosted at IIT-Delhi, the event mainly aimed at creating awareness among people and popularise Indian handicrafts.Speaking on the occasion, the chief guest of the show, IAS, Secretary, Ministry of Textile, Government of India, Zohra Chatterje said that the huge gathering present on the occasion was a tribute to the 69 lakh artisans of the country who are incessantly toiling hard to come up with the finest products. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting”It is also an attempt to keep young generation connected to handicrafts, since not many know that the number of handloom employees and the business was facing a downfall during recent times. But IIT Delhi’s support to our initiative will inspire to encourage handicrafts and bring it back succesfully,’ she added.The event further proceeded with an audio-visual shown on Indian artisans across the country and paid a tribute to their toil including the magnificent products they create out of what not. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixAn initiative by the Ministry of Textiles, Apne Desh Ko Jano witnessed a grand fashion show with models wearing attractive handicrafts artifacts and products sourced from various parts of the country coupled with rounds of quickfire question and answers on them conducted by veteran quiz master Barry O’ Brien.The models sashayed the ramp in three different rounds. Each round focussed on particular handicraft region. The handicraft dresses along with the accessories were designed by Yana Ngoba from Arunachal Pradesh. There was a special round when they donned dresses from the northeastern states too.According to Ngoba, the concept is not aimed at drawing a border between technology and craftsmanship but rather trying to blend the two.’We believe the very purpose of creating awareness of handicrafts through fashion shows only is defeated as the people are not aware of the products they carry and no meaningful information is given. Apart from being visual feast, it does not serve the purpose for which it is done. So, why not we’re-create the re-created?,’ she said at the event.Moving on further, the other round had visuals of various handicraft prototypes and artefacts shown from around India and the audience, a mix of students and guests was asked to identify them along with the area they belong to.Winners were showered with numerous chocolates as gift and also awarded that particular handicraft product.Finally, the event concluded with a couple of patriotic songs sung by one and all present there to enliven the spirit of unity and bring about oneness in hearts irrespective of the diversity we belong to and ended with a vow to always make our country proud.last_img read more

Indian theatre faring poorly

first_imgIt’s faring very badly… because the kind of state subsidised or state sponsored theatre that we have is very mediocre, because of the bureaucracy involved and a lot going on that is very unhealthy for artistic growth’, Dattani said in an interview. An out-of-the-box-thinker, the Mumbai-based Gujarati has also donned the director’s hat for movie ventures such as the Shabana Azmi-starrer Morning Raga and Mango Souffle (2002), tagged as the country’s first gay male film. He was in the city to conduct an intensive acting workshop organised by art and culture magazine Kindle in association with the iLEAD educational institution and The Corner Courtyard, a newly-opened boutique hotel. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’He is the first Indian playwright in English to receive a Sahitya Akademi award. And to pump fresh life into regional theatre, there’s a need for more money, more collaborations and at the heart of it, artistic integrity, says he.‘Collaborations are good…one can learn from marketing techniques…how they (international theatre) can sustain themselves in stiff competition. Acknowledging that films are “our bloodline”, he conceded that while Bollywood can be meaningful, its shallowness has influenced commercial Indian theatre. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix‘Bollywood is inspired by shallow Hollywood and commercial Indian theatre is inspired by shallow Bollywood’, he said pointing out the vicious circle. Moreover, the ace playwright highlighted the flip side of blindly aping western concepts in theatre, that is adopting a text-based approach while traditionally it is a rich blend of text, dance, music and drama. International influences, he said, ‘are not necessary at all’. ‘In fact, sometimes I feel they are detrimental. I am not against cultural collaborations but what I am talking about is blind following of western concepts and systems – which is what modern Indian theatre does. Noting some encouraging trends in Indian theatre, such as its becoming more visually rich – in terms of intelligent use of space and spontaneity – and shifting away from verbosity’, Dattani said the surge in numbers of international collaborations and experiments hasn’t yielded anything original.Known for exploring sensitive issues, he dubs recent instances of curbing creative freedom in India as an ‘unhealthy trend’ but also a ‘backhanded compliment’ to the might of art forms in bringing about change.‘I think it is a very unhealthy trend and in a way it’s a backhanded compliment to theatre because people are saying that theatre is powerful enough to make a difference and that is why you are bringing in all these restrictions,’ Dattani added.‘With these restrictions the first freedom that goes is the freedom of expression and the rest follows,’ said the man behind thought-provoking works like Dance Like a Man, Thirty Days in September and Final Solutions. In his tryst with theatre and films, the 55-year-old has delved deep into topics of gender bias, communal tensions and homosexuality among others. A staunch believer in theatre’s power to ‘reflect society’, Dattani said the medium should be channeled to showcase the current scenario of increasing violence against women as well as bring out the ‘much-ignored’ lesbian-gay-bisexual-transgender (LGBT) community.last_img read more

Fire breaks out at Sealdah Big Bazaar

first_imgKolkata: A fire broke out at the Big Bazar in Sealdah on Thursday morning triggering tension among the staff members and customers. No casualty or injury has been reported in the incident so far.Some of the employees spotted smoke billowing out of the first floor of the four-storeyed shopping complex at around 10.20 am. The security personnel of the shopping mall swung into action and tried to douse the flames with the fire fighting system available at the building. A thick black smoke soon covered the entire floor. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe shopping mall was opened at around 10 am and some customers had also started pouring in when the incident took place. The security men tried to bring the situation under control but they failed to control the spread of the smoke to the other floors. There were, however, less number of customers in the morning hours, who were eventually safely removed from the area. The electricity connection was immediately put off following the incident. After being informed, 4 fire tenders were pressed into action. The firemen faced difficulties to reach the source of the fire as the entire first floor was filled with smoke. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThey broke the glasses on the first floor to release the smoke. Senior police officers also reached the spot and cordoned off the entire area. The other floors of the building were soon evacuated to avert any untoward incident. According to preliminary investigation, the fire officials suspect that an electrical short circuit in the AC machine might have caused the fire. An eyewitness said there were electrical sparks from an AC machine situated at the Women and Child section of the shopping mall.last_img read more

1984 riots Two convicts get interim bail from Delhi High Court

first_imgDelhi high court on Tuesday granted interim bail of 60 days to Captain Bhagmal, one of the three convicts serving life term in a 1984 anti-Sikh riots case, on medical grounds. A Bench of justices Sanjiv Khanna and Ashutosh Kumar said Bhagmal will remain on bail for 60 days from the date of his release and listed the matter for further hearing on July 1. It also extended the interim relief by 30 days to convict Balwan Khokhar on the same ground.  Also Read – Company director arrested for swindling Rs 345 croreThe court, however, asked Bhagmal to furnish a bail bond of Rs 50,000 with one surety of the like amount. It further directed retired naval officer Bhagmal not to leave India without prior intimation to the court. On April 15, the court had called for a medical report on Balwan Khokhar after it was informed that the convict broke his hand after a fall in the jail. The court had on that day refused to grant bail to co-convict Girdhari Lal. The trio and two others were held guilty in a case relating to the murder of five members of a family in Raj Nagar area of Delhi Cantonment on November 1, 1984, a day after the assassination of then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi.  Also Read – Man who cheated 20 women on matrimonial websites arrestedThey also challenged their conviction and award of life sentence by the trial court in May 2013. The trial court had acquitted Congress leader Sajjan Kumar in the case but awarded life term to Bhagmal, Khokhar and Girdhari Lal. The court had also awarded three years jail term to two others — former MLA Mahender Yadav and Kishan Khokhar.  The high court had in September 2013 denied bail to Bhagmal. The convicts have filed their appeals before the HC while CBI has also filed an appeal demanding death sentence for the trio, saying they were engaged in “a planned communal riot” and “religious cleansing”.last_img read more

6 killed over 50 injured after speeding bus overturns

first_imgKolkata: Six people were killed and as many as 56 others injured, some of them critically, when a bus they were travelling in overturned near Jhitka forest of Lalgarh in Jhargram district on Saturday.The injured passengers have been undergoing treatment at Midnapore Medical College and Hospital and some at private hospitals as well. Some of the injured passengers are stated to be in critical condition. According to the police, around 18 passengers sustained serious injuries in the accident. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsPolice said that the private bus was carrying passengers to Belpahari from Jhalbani on Saturday morning.According to the preliminary investigation, there were around 100 passengers travelling in the bus at the time of the accident. Many of them were going to join a programme organised by the tribal populace at Belpahari.According to locals, the bus was overcrowded and some of the passengers were found sitting on the roof of the vehicle when it overturned while taking a sharp bend near Jhitka forest. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedEyewitnesses told the police that the bus was running at a high speed at the time of the accident as a result of which the driver could not control it. While taking a sharp turn the driver lost control and the bus overturned and eventually fell into a roadside field. The bus driver fled the spot immediately after the accident. The locals rushed to the spot and rescued the injured passengers. Six persons were declared brought dead after being taken to Midnapore Medical College and Hospital. Some of the injured passengers were taken to other hospitals as well. After being informed, police reached the spot and started a probe in this regard. They are investigating if the bus developed any technical glitch or the accident occurred due to the over-speeding of the vehicle.Police added that the driver had applied sudden brakes but failed to control it. The investigators are not quite sure if any other vehicle had came in front of the speeding bus leading to the accident.They are looking into all possible causes that might have led to the mishap. Some of the passengers and the locals are being probed in this connection so far.Raids are being conducted to nab the bus driver who has been at large since the accident happened. The bus was later lifted with the help of a crane.The real cause of the accident will be confirmed by the police after carrying out a probe into the incident.last_img read more

Monsoon returns to city lightning kills five in Nadia Bankura

first_imgKolkata: The city on Sunday witnessed light to moderate rain as the monsoon current has gained strength after remaining stalled for the past two weeks, due to the impact of the westerly winds.As many as five persons were reportedly killed after being struck by lightning at Nadia and Bankura in different incidents. It has been learnt that 3 persons were killed at Hanskhali area of Nadia, while the other two victims are from Bankura.The monsoon current may further be intensified in South Bengal in the next 48 hours. Apart from the city, the South Bengal districts which will receive maximum rainfall are North 24-Parganas, South 24-Parganas, Bankura, West and East Midnapore, Jhargram and Birbhum. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsWith the monsoon finally coming back in the city and other parts of Bengal after its official arrival around two weeks ago, there is a cause of concern for North Bengal districts as the Regional Meteorological Centre at Alipore has predicted heavy to very heavy rainfall in the region.According to the weather office, a warning has been issued to the sub-Himalayan districts in North Bengal, as heavy rain is likely to lash the districts in the next two days. This comes at a time when Jalpaiguri and Alipurduar districts have already received up to 250 mm rainfall in the past few days. Prediction of some more rains posing a threat to the road and rail communication in the region has also been made. People living in the river banks and low lying areas have already been cautioned by the district administration. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedWhile North Bengal is expected to receive heavy to very heavy rainfall, the weather in Kolkata and most parts of South Bengal will remain pleasant.However, there is a prediction of thunderstorm accompanied with gusty wind and lightning in the South Bengal districts in the next two days.The day in Kolkata and adjoining districts started with an overcast sky on Sunday morning. The city later witnessed a downpour, resulting in the decrease of temperature. People have got rid of a high level of humidity that made people sweat in the past few days. The weather on Sunday turned cool as the day progressed. The Met office in the city predicted that the sky in Kolkata and some of the South Bengal districts will remain cloudy in the later part of next week, with intermittent lightning and thundershower to strike in some parts.The districts like North 24-Parganas, South 24-Parganas, Nadia, Murshidabad and Howrah received light to moderate rainfall, which has brought down the temperature by a few notches.According to a weather expert, a fast-improving progress of monsoon circulation is likely to cause more rains all over Bengal in the next week. An alert has been issued to fishermen, as a wind is expected to blow over Bay of Bengal at 35-40 km per hour.last_img read more

WBSEDCL bags IPPAI award for one of the best innovations

first_imgKolkata: West Bengal State Electricity Distribution Company Limited (WBSEDCL) has received an award for ‘one of the best innovations’ for ‘Energy storage through Hydro’ at IPPAI Power Awards, organised by the Independent Power Producers Association of India (IPPAI) on November 24 at Belgundi Belgaum in Karnataka.The award has been conferred in recognition of WBSEDCL’s innovation and sustainability at the 900 MW Purulia Pumped Storage Project (PPSP) and its futuristic approach for the upcoming 1,000 MW Turga Pumped Storage Project and proposed 900 MW Bandu Pumped Storage Project. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeBoth Turga and Bandu projects will be developed in Purulia district, adjacent to the site of the pumped storage project. A Press statement issued by the CPRO, WBSEDCL, says this is another jewel in WBSEDCL’s crown and it will encourage the organisation to ensure quality power and better service to consumers across the state. It may be mentioned here that the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) has been roped in to construct the 1,000 MW Turga pumped storage project at Purulia, which will be carried out by the state Power department. JICA has agreed to provide a loan of Rs 5,000 crore for the project. The state cabinet has already approved the total project cost of Rs 6,922 crore.last_img read more

Steeped in patriarchy

first_imgIt has been a decade of watching movies where beautiful, young women dance surrounded by hundreds of men; bikini clad ladies jumping on the beach and of course, wailing, deprived and depressed girls heart-broken in love and women subjected to mistreatment. We all enjoy the Bollywood item numbers and feel pity for the woman crying in movies. But what happens when the ordinary Indian woman comes out through cinema? Will it be accepted by the people? Also Read – Add new books to your shelfWe, as a society portray women as creatures who are always dependent on the so- called better sex-“men” and it reflects in our movies. A girl is first dependent on her father or family, she falls in love with a guy, sings some romantic songs on the top of a hill, the guy fights off villains, there is some item song in between with no sense at all and the hero-heroine get married and have kids – this is the basic plot for almost every masala movie that we come across. But what happens if a movie with struggles, aspirations, fantasies, desires and dreams inspired from real women of our society is made, unconcerned about what the society thinks about it? Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThese past few days, we saw a huge controversy about a certain movie titled Lipstick under my burkha. It may have grabbed the international attention with Spirit of Asia Award, Audience Award at the Glasgow Film Festival, and the Oxfam Award in the category of Best Film in Gender Equality but all these could not save Alankrita Srivastava’s film from the wrath of the Central Board Film Certification in India. Marked as “lady- oriented”, it received a status which made it unfit for public viewing. A copy of CBFC letter received by the film’s producer Prakash Jha States, “The story is lady oriented and focuses on their fantasy about life. There are continuous sexual scenes, abusive words, audio pornography and a bit of sensitive touch about one particular section of society, hence, the film is refused.” The film from a “women’s perspective” revolves around the life of four women – burkha-clad college girl, a young beautician, a mother of three and a 55-year-old widow who rediscovers her sexuality. Whenever there is a movie made with a realistic portrayal of ordinary women, there is a huge cry over it. Some claim that this is a false interpretation of women of our society, some take it on their religion and some straight away dismiss the idea of an independent woman with high ambitions and curiosity. In a country like India, which proudly showcases its so called “liberal” views and culture; it is shocking to see how the society is still dominated by the male gaze. On one hand, women are given the place of a goddess, calling them pure and on the other, they are being objectified, either to fulfill the desire of a man or the society. A woman can wear shiny costumes and dance to those trashy, low-grade item numbers with a bunch of men staring at her in a lecherous manner but dare she open her mouth and talk about her emotions, dreams, and sexual desires; she would be in a huge trouble for protesting or disobeying the patriarchy. How dare she see things from her own perspective and change the status quo of the society? And, yes, it is not only women but also men who try to break free from the patriarchy they face. Cinema plays an important role in shaping human mind. From friendship to love affair, we Indians have a way of comparing it with what we see in reel life. Is it not similar in case of women? This is not the first time that artistic expressions are being restricted. Several movies like Angry Indian Goddesses, Fire, The Pink Mirror, Bandit Queen and many more had the same fate. “Such strong movies should be available for public viewing. There are other ways to watch these movies but cinema is a medium which reaches the mass audience and by censoring it and frowning upon it, we are confining that reach,” says Neha Singh, a second-year NIFT student. “The censoring of films and banning has become frequent. It is as if the filmmakers should make their films to impress the censor board and not their target audience. Instead of banning the movies, the whole nation should actually take a stand against these so called “liberal” decision-makers,” said Priyanka Ghosh Dastidar, a journalism graduate.An important feature of any nation, which claims itself to be democratic is the freedom of speech and expression guaranteed to its citizen. To break the status quo mentality, acknowledgement of new ideas and thoughts becomes very important. “As a woman, and as a filmmaker, I have decided that I will not shut up. I refuse to be silenced. I will not be discouraged. I will fight to ensure that ‘Lipstick Under My burkha’ is released in cinemas in India. And I will continue to make “lady-oriented” films as long as I can,” says Alankrita Srivastava, the director of’ Lipstick Under My Burkha’. In our society, a woman talking about her sexual desires, her thoughts and her ideas is a taboo. The important question is when will the time come when women can break free of all the bondages.last_img read more

Forest dept successful in cutting down humantusker conflicts

first_imgKolkata: The state Forest department has made a significant achievement in bringing down human deaths resulting from conflict with elephants across the state.Statistics recently compiled by the department has revealed that the number of persons killed in human-elephant conflict, which was 89 in 2014-15, has come down to 52 in 2018-19. The number of persons injured in connection with jumbo attacks has also dropped drastically from 102 in 2014-15 to 33 in 2018-19. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataThe fall in the number of deaths has been more or less the same in both North Bengal and South Bengal forests. There have been instances when the jumbos had entered villages adjoining forest areas and caused havoc at farmlands, resulting in damage to crops. “However, strong vigil from Forest department officials has also resulted in improvement, with crop damage caused by the pachyderms being much less. 8,340 hectares of farmland was damaged in 2014-15, which has come down to 416 hectares in 2018-19,” a senior official of the Forest department said. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateThe damage caused by elephants to village huts has also fallen from 4,357 to 336 in number, in the last five years. “Fire torches are used to scare away the animals but there has not been a single case of inflicting torture on the animals,” the official added. The Forest department has been constantly undertaking measures to address the issue of human-elephant conflict. Habitat improvement for the jumbos, regular awareness generation campaigns, rapid response force of the department, regular training of staff etc. are some of the steps that have been taken. “The Airavat vehicles equipped with state-of-the-art equipment for better management of conflicts between elephants and villagers living near forests that were launched in September 2017, have also yielded good results,” the official said. The vehicles are GPS-enabled and have space to keep tranquilliser guns, which are needed to control marauding elephants. The department is also maintaining liaison with the Railways and holds meetings every month to prevent elephant deaths on railway tracks, which still pose a major concern. Till December 2017, as many as 30 elephants had died in Bengal after being hit by speeding trains in the last five years. “We are trying to use technology in rail tracks to curb jumbo deaths. Three censor-based technologies- seismic, acoustic and infrared, have been exhibited in detail at a national level workshop in Chalsa in November last year. The technology can be interlinked with artificial intelligence to track movement of tuskers or other animals along rail tracks,” the official added.last_img read more

VIT recognises relief efforts in floodhit Kerala

first_imgThanima ’18, the annual cultural event to mark Onam festival was recently held at Vellore Institute of Technology. The festival was inaugurated by Malayalam actor Amit Chakkalakkal while Dr G Viswanathan, Founder, and Chancellor of VIT, handed over prizes to those who had extended help in all forms to the Kerala flood victims.Thanima is held at VIT and organised by students and faculty hailing from Kerala. The recent Kerala floods had caused immense destruction to the State and people from all over the world had contributed for relief and rehabilitation. Students, parents, staff and the management had mobilised a relief amount Rs 1 crore, which was personally handed over to Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan by Dr Viswanathan. In addition, with help from philanthropists in Vellore, students mobilised Rs 20 lakh worth of clothes, medicines, and stationery and this was sent in a truck to Kerala. This year’s Thanima was held as an event to express gratitude to the people who had contributed to the flood relief. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfSpeaking at the function held at Anna Auditorium, Dr Viswanathan said that Thanima was being staged this year as an event to express gratitude to all those who had contributed to the relief and rehabilitation following the floods in Kerala. He said that he felt immensely happy that Thanima was conducted by students from Kerala, 1,500 of whom were studying here and 160 faculties, who taught at VIT. Thanima was an event in which not just people from Kerala took part, but students from faculty from all over India took part with great interest. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveChakkalakkal, who inaugurated the event by lighting a traditional lamp, said that it gave him immense happiness to take part in the cultural festival. After completing his school he went to Bengaluru to study engineering. He said that he had completed his engineering studies eight years ago and it was struggling to succeed in life that had brought him as chief guest at the function in VIT now. He further extolled students to dream and struggle in order to fulfill it. Besides Malayalam writer Pushpa Kurup, who was the guest of honour, Director of Students Welfare Amit Mahendrakar, and professors Naiji, Jagadeesh Kumar also marked their presence at the occasion. Students presented kummi dance, drama, and other cultural programmes, followed by a vote of thanks by student coordinators Sachin and Malavika.last_img read more

Over 60 arrested in Bengals Bhatpara political blamegame on

first_imgKolkata: West Bengal’s ruling Trinamool Congress and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) on Tuesday continued to blame each other over the violence in Bhatpara Assembly constituency – that voted in a bypoll last Sunday – while over 60 people have been arrested. The by-polls were necessitated after Arjun Singh, who defected to the BJP from Trinamool Congress, resigned as Bhatpara MLA to contest the Lok Sabha polls. His son Pawan Kumar Singh is fighting the Assembly by-polls on a BJP ticket. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: Mamata He faces former minister Madan Mitra of the Trinamool. “Police are beating up women and their role has called for immense protests. It is highly shameful. I want Election Commission to deploy military here and assign a special observer to oversee law and order and restore peace,” Singh said. On the other hand, Mitra alleged that BJP workers had torched the residences of Trinamool workers and councillors and the party has informed the District Magistrate about the situation. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in state “We want the rule of law to be in place immediately. If it is not established, people will take the matter in their hands,” he said. Earlier, state Food Minister and Trinamool North 24 Parganas district President Jyotipriyo Mullick had blamed Singh and the central forces for disruptions and obstruction of trains at Kakinara station. “Singh and his men are creating trouble. They are setting shops and houses on fire, disrupting trains and harassing the public. The paramilitary forces, deployed during the elections, are also supporting them. We have met the District Magistrate and sought their arrest within 24 hours,” he said. Police have made several arrests and deployed the Rapid Action Force (RAF) to control the situation. “Till morning 62 people were arrested. Raids are on and there have been more arrests. Some explosive material has also been recovered,” a senior officer of Barrackpore Police commissionerate said. He said prohibitory orders under Section 144 of the Criminal Procedure Code, banning assembly of more than four people in an area, have been imposed and police pickets posted. “We are announcing that people should not believe in rumours,” the officer added.last_img read more

60000 panchayat members pay hiked in West Bengal

first_imgKolkata: The Mamata Banerjee government Monday increased the remuneration of about 60,000 members of three-tier panchayat system in West Bengal to recognise their “tireless work”. The hike will cost the state government exchequer Rs 220-225 crore. Banerjee Monday chaired a meeting with the members of zilla parishads of different districts at Nabanna Sabhaghar. The state has 825 zilla parishad members, 9,217 panchayat samiti members and 48,649 gram panchayat members. Speaking to reporters after the meeting, the chief minister said, “The panchayat members work tirelessly for the people but are paid little. To change this situation, we have decided to increase their remuneration. This will increase the expense of the government by around Rs 220-225 crore.” Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: Mamata At the meeting, Banerjee asked them to improve public relations and meet people to address their problems. “They have to take steps to improve public relations. We have instructed the members to keep in touch with the local people and fix two hours every week to meet them,” she added. Sources said she had asked the members not to take any favour from people in exchange of government schemes. The government has been battling allegations that its leaders had taken money from people who wanted to avail welfare schemes. (With inputs from Indian Express)last_img read more

3 in 4 Indians use more than 1 device simultaneously

first_imgThree in four adult consumers in India constantly use more than one device simultaneously and spend almost 90 per cent of their workday interacting with devices, said a study on May 31. Interestingly, switching screens is common in India with 50 per cent of consumers starting an activity on mobile and then switching to a computer, said the study titled “2019 Mobile Marketing Research – India Market”. Switching is most common among male millennials, the research showed. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfWhen faced with the proposition of having their smartphone taken away for two weeks, 39 per cent said it would be a major hassle. This reaction was more pronounced among millennial consumers, said the study which showed that Indian consumers have developed an increased affinity for smartphones when it comes to all online activities as compared with computers. Video calling (88 per cent), checking social media (85 per cent) and texting (89 per cent) are among the key activities which Indian consumers prefer to use their mobile devices for as compared to computers. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveSmartphones have also emerged as the most preferred medium for all shopping activities with 89 per cent of consumers currently being able to do all the retail activities they want on mobile, showed the findings based on a survey of 1,000 adult consumers in India. A vast majority of consumers (83 per cent) have a strong preference for using mobile apps over mobile browsers while interacting with a company. The study revealed that more than half of adults surveyed regularly use voice commands. “The rapid proliferation of advanced technologies and their increased usage on mobile devices, points to potential new areas for marketers to engage with consumers,” said researchers. “Considering the fast consumer adoption of voice tech, we expect to start seeing more brands experimenting with immersive ways of customer engagement over the next few years,” researchers further added.last_img read more

SRM offers scholarships to students from Perambalur

first_imgSRM Institute of Science and Technology offered scholarships to 300 students resident in Perambalur constituency. The initiative of the institute was announced at a press meet by Dr T R Paarivendhar, SRMIST Founder Chancellor and Perambalur MP on July 6, 2019.The recipients hailing from economically weaker sections were selected based on their performance in their respective board examinations, he informed. Among those present were Vice Chancellor Dr. Sandeep Sancheti, Vice Chancellors Dr. T P Ganesan and Dr. R Balasubramanian, Director Admissions Dr. T. V. Gopal and Controller of Examinations Dr. S Ponnusamy. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfDr Paarivendhar said that he wanted to give something back to people of the constituency, who had elected him as their representative in Parliament. He feels that students should make full use of this opportunity to pursue higher studies, assuring that all the deserving students would get suitable placements. “Out of a total of 1500 applications from aspirants, 300 students were shortlisted for different courses offered at SRMIST,” he stated. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe break-up of overall seats allocation is as follows: Kulithalai 47, Lalgudi 47, Mannachanallur 29, Musiri 37, Perambalur 95 and Thuraiyur 45. The list of recipients was handed over by Dr Paarivendhar to the Vice Chancellor Dr Sandeep Sancheti, at the event. Asked about the allocation of funds to private universities for research, Dr Paarivendhar said, “Internally we are discussing with AIU and EPSI to allot more funds to encourage more research activities.” On the proposal by Union finance minister Nirmala Sitharaman in her budget for bringing legislation to set up a higher education commission to give shape to the new education policy, he said, “SRM faculty would give their inputs for the same.” He hopes that private universities would be benefitted from the creation of a National Research Foundation to fund research within the educational system. Talking about the water scarcity situation in Perambalur constituency, he said, “We are distributing water through tankers and digging bore wells.”last_img read more

Web gives freedom to experiment Gul

first_imgFrom being an actress to a pilot, an entrepreneur, traveller, and a mother, Gul Panag has left no stone unturned in proving her versatility to the world. In a recent interview with Millenniumpost, Gul talks about her outlook on web platform, recent projects, challenges of being a generalist and much more…. Every actor/filmmaker has their own reason to choose web as a platform. What is your reason for working on web projects? As an actor, I’ve always been drawn to good story telling. The web offers great opportunities for experimentation, which is core to interesting storytelling. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf Lately, your presence on the big screen has decreased. Does that mean you will be only focussing on web now? I don’t think I want to restrict myself to a particular medium – it depends on how compelling I find the story, irrespective of the medium its told on. I think I am fortunate enough to find roles that seem to be written for me. For example, Student of the Year – which was a mainstream film – had me playing a bike riding, fitness coach, both of which are true passions of mine. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive After having worked in the web space, do you think it is a better platform to narrate a story more elaborately? Yes, because you have the freedom to experiment with the number of episodes and each episode can be of different length. As for the films, there are short ones with incredible stories that creates a lasting impression. However, long films are difficult to remember for a considerable time. But in the end, it depends on the story, who tells it, and how that is important. There are rumours that you are going to work with Anushka Sharma’s production house for a web series… Yes, I am working on a web series and Anushka is producing it. This Amazon Prime’s original is an investigative thriller and I am playing a pivotal role in it. You have explored different genres in your career.What kind of stories interests you the most? I don’t think it’s any one genre. I’ve done light films like Hello and SOTY and others like Manorama 6 Feet Under and Dor. As an actor, you have to be able to span a variety of roles and genres. But the script and the set-up is very important. How does Gul Panag – an entrepreneur, pilot, traveller, blogger, actor, mom – balance her personal and professional life? It is tough! But then there’s so much I want to do. Being an actor is just one part of who I am. I like the tapestry that my life’s creating with all these different pieces… it’s a fun picture. Please tell us something about your upcoming projects on the web as well as on the big screen? As mentioned earlier, I’m shooting for Anushka’s Clean Slate Films for Amazon Prime. I’m also shooting for a film produced by Neil Nitin Mukesh called Bypass Road in which I play an antagonist. And a series for Amazon Prime with Manoj Bajpayee.last_img read more