Cheap HDMI cables work fine probably

first_img Tags HDMI just works, or it doesn’t There is no difference between an HDMI cable that just barely works and one that expensively overbuilt. If the cable is able to transmit 4K HDR from your source to your TV, it works. That’s all it needs to do. If it cuts in and out, then it doesn’t work (or at best, doesn’t work for that application). This has to do with how HDMI cables transmit data. They are, in essence, a pipe, just like the pipes in your house. If you’re getting the right water pressure and temperature in the bathroom, the pipes work. If you replace them with gold-plated pipes, you’re not suddenly going to get showers of vodka. This is essentially what expensive HDMI cables are promising. The idea when buying HDMI cables should be: get the least expensive cable that works. When it comes to modern 4K HDR TVs, this requires a slightly better cable than an old 1080p, TV, but thankfully the prices are all so low this effectively doesn’t matter. Related on CNET Four great 4K TVs for every budget HDMI 2.1 is here, but don’t worry about it now When should I upgrade my HDMI cables? How HDR works Which HDMI cable do you need? 5 Comments 2:18center_img Share your voice That caveat, though… You’ve probably noticed that throughout this article I’ve hedged a bit. That’s because not all cheap HDMI cables will work. Older, or poorly made, cheap HDMI cables might not be capable of the bandwidth required to transmit 4K HDR. It’s important to realize that just because one $5 cable didn’t work that doesn’t mean a different $5 cable won’t work. It also doesn’t mean that if the $5 cable didn’t work, you have to get a $50 cable. You likely have HDMI cables already. It’s entirely possible these will work with your new TV. But then again, they might not. The only way to know for sure is to test them out. If your source (a media streamer, 4K Blu-ray player, etc), is sending a 4K HDR signal, and your TV says it’s getting a 4K HDR signal, you’re all set. The cable works. No other cable will make the image look, or make the sound, better. If your setup doesn’t work, check all your gear’s settings before you consider new cables.Monoprice and Amazon HDMI cables, two inexpensive choices that can handle 4K HDR signals for just a few dollars a foot. Monoprice and Amazon If you still need new cables, your best bet is to stick with the big names in cheap cables, like Monoprice and Amazon. Both sell HDMI cables that cost just a few dollars a foot, and are capable of transmitting 4K HDR. We have a buying guide for those, plus a few other options, at “Which HDMI cable do you need?”If you need longer cables, those will cost a bit more, and over 15 feet/3 meters, you should consider active cables. These use a bit of power in the HDMI connection to boost the signal over longer distances. Even with this added tech, they should only cost you around $2 a foot. Save your money It’s amazing to me that the HDMI up-sell still goes on. Just last week I received a tweet asking about silver HDMI cables. I told him that no, despite what he was told, he didn’t need a $140 HDMI cable to connect his new TV. When we, as humans, seem programmed to believe that if something is more expensive it must be better, it’s easy for companies to take advantage. Don’t fall for it. Got a question for Geoff? First, check out all the other articles he’s written on topics like why all HDMI cables are the same, TV resolutions explained, LED LCD vs. OLED and more. Still have a question? Tweet at him @TechWriterGeoff, then check out his travel photography on Instagram. He also thinks you should check out his best-selling sci-fi novel and its sequel.  Now playing: Watch this: If you just bought a new TV, chances are you might feel the need to get expensive new HDMI cables. Resist the temptation.Even with Ultra HD 4K resolution, high dynamic range, and wide color gamut, you don’t need expensive HDMI cables. It’s probably that your current HDMI cables could work fine, but if they don’t, no matter what a salesperson tells you, you don’t need to spend more than a few dollars/pounds/euros a foot (0.3m). Even over long runs of 15ft/3m or more, you shouldn’t have to spend a lot. Some stores are still hyping “high-end” HDMI cables with all sorts of fancy buzzwords, but you don’t need them. They won’t improve performance or allow additional features compared to the right cheap HDMI cables. The only cable features you need are “18 Gbps,” which is how much they need to transmit 4K HDR, and maybe “Certified Premium.” This label is found on cables that are guaranteed to work with 4K HDR. A cable might work if it doesn’t have this logo, but should almost certainly work if it does. Fortunately, there are plenty of cheap cables with these features. TVs Audio Home Entertainment HDMIlast_img read more

Market Capitalisation of BSE Stocks Hits 10Month Low

first_imgThe market capitalisation of companies listed on the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) fell to a 10-month low in the concluding week, as overseas investors offloaded shares in the domestic stock market amid growing worries on the Indian economy.The BSE market capitalisation fell to Rs 93.83 trillion on Friday, reaching a level not seen since October 2014. The benchmark BSE Sensex plunged 562 points or 2.2% on the last trading day of the week to close at 25,201 points, posting a 13-month low. Overall, the Sensex lost more than 1,000 points in the week.Banking, auto, real estate, oil and metal stocks saw a massive erosion in their market capitalisation due to a high volatility in the markets.Market capitalisation of state-owned Oil and Natural Gas Corp (ONGC) fell by over 15,300 crore during the week despite the company’s overseas arm buying a 15% stake in Vankorneft, a subsidiary of Russia’s oil giant Rosneft.ONGC Videsh Ltd (OVL) has reportedly paid $1.25 billion (Rs 8,250 crore) for a stake in Vankorneft, a source familiar with the development told Reuters.Profit booking led to a sell-off in the IT stocks, resulting in a decline in their market capitalisation. IT stocks have shown some strength in the past few weeks due to a deprecating rupee.Weak gross domestic product (GDP) in the first quarter, concerns on China slowdown, rising crude oil prices and rising expectations over the interest rate hike by the US central bank were the major negatives that hit the markets during the week.last_img read more

University of Asia Pacific students attacked at Farmgate

first_imgUniversity of Asia PacificA group of University of Asia Pacific students came under attack when they tried to reach Farmgate intersection with a procession from their campus on Sunday, witnesses said.According to the witnesses, a group of yet-to-be-known youths wearing helmets swooped on the demonstrating students with sticks near Ananda Cinema Hall in Farmgate around 12:30pm.Dispersed and chased, the protesting students of University of Asia Pacific took shelter on their campus.The attackers, then, vandalised windows of Asia Pacific University campus located in Farmgate’s Green Road.Students started to gather in different streets of the capital for the eighth consecutive day on Sunday morning demanding safe roads and justice for death of two of their fellows in a road accident on 29 July.The movement sparked off after shipping minister Shajahan Khan smilingly compared the Dhaka Airport Road accident with the one in India, which killed 33 people, while talking to newsmen within one hour of the crash.last_img read more

Connecticut WWIIEra Newspapers Offer View of Black Life

first_imgBy Susan Haigh, The Associated PressA detailed account of African-American life in the Northeast during World War II, carefully preserved in the basement of the Connecticut State Library, has been uploaded for a new, modern readership.Hunched over a lighted magnifying machine, Christine Gauvreau spent months scrolling through reels of microfilm of Black-owned and operated Connecticut newspapers, preparing them to be digitized. They’re some of the latest entrants in the Chronicling America project, a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress to create a national digital database of historically significant U.S. newspapers published between 1690 and 1963.This Nov. 29, 2018 photo shows an original April 23, 1949 copy of the New England Bulletin, Black-owned and operated weekly newspaper in Hartford, Conn. Old microfilm of this and other incarnations of the newspaper are being digitized so they can be available online as part of the United States Newspaper Program. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)“It’s really a document from the very early civil rights movement in Hartford,” said Gauvreau, who recently finished archiving old issues of the now-defunct Connecticut Chronicle, Hartford Chronicle, Hartford-Springfield Chronicle and New England Bulletin, a family of Black-owned and operated newspapers that began in 1940 and operated consecutively for about a decade.Connecticut’s latest additions to Chronicling America mark the first African-American newspapers added to the project from a Northeast state.The four Connecticut-based weekly newspapers upheld a “crusade tradition” of journalism, Gauvreau said. They pushed for the hiring of Hartford’s first Black firefighters and Black bus drivers; advocated for a law barring racial bias in the National Guard; and exposed substandard housing, inferior quality goods and high prices in Harford’s North End neighborhood. In an April 23, 1949 article, the New England Bulletin criticized the “vacillating stand” taken by Connecticut’s State Board of Education, which agreed to allow public high school field trips to “jimcro” Washington D.C. “even though Negro students are segregated” at certain hotels.In a front page editorial published in May 14, 1949, readers were urged to write to the State Board of Education ask members to “STOP PASSING THE BUCK” and prove “beyond a shadow of a doubt that the board is very much against segregation.” The editorial said the New England Bulletin was taking a stand and criticizing the board for allowing the trips because the decision was “contradictory to the forward-looking policies of the state with regard to any kind of racial injustice.”An Oct. 5, 1946 column by James E. Shankel, editor of the Hartford Chronicle at the time, wrote about “bare-faced racial discrimination” in Connecticut. He noted a member of a New Haven church had come across a letter from an East Haddam developer advertising lakefront lots for sale and how “this summer colony is restricted to the Caucasian race.”“Obviously, this advertising letter form was never intended to fall into the hands of prospective Negro buyers,” Shankel wrote.Other pages of the newspapers provide a window into the culture of the time. Articles cover everything from an Easter sermon at Mount Calvary Baptist Church to performances by musical greats. One advertisement announces a scheduled performance by iconic jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald at the State Theater in Hartford. Written by correspondents stationed throughout the state and region, many articles chronicle the accomplishments of Black residents. One headline announces “City’s Only Army Nurse Returns,” a reference to a Black nurse from Hartford who was honorably discharged from the Army Nursing Corps.“They wanted to tell the story about what was happening in Black Hartford. They also wanted to highlight issues of discrimination. They wanted to celebrate Black achievement at the same time,” said historian and Professor Stacey K. Close, the associate provost and vice president of equity and diversity at Eastern Connecticut State University. “During World War II, there was a push to improve the employment of African-Americans in terms of the city and the state. And this newspaper took up the challenge.”There was also an effort by the newspapers to make the readers aware of what was happening elsewhere, especially in the southern states where many still had family members.“They also made sure that young people knew what was going on in the rest of the country,” Close said.He added “there was an urgency” to what the newspapers were doing.“They were trying to push the city to do better than they had done in the past,” he said. “They were an organization and a paper pushing for social, economic and political change.”last_img read more

1984 riots Two convicts get interim bail from Delhi High Court

first_imgDelhi high court on Tuesday granted interim bail of 60 days to Captain Bhagmal, one of the three convicts serving life term in a 1984 anti-Sikh riots case, on medical grounds. A Bench of justices Sanjiv Khanna and Ashutosh Kumar said Bhagmal will remain on bail for 60 days from the date of his release and listed the matter for further hearing on July 1. It also extended the interim relief by 30 days to convict Balwan Khokhar on the same ground.  Also Read – Company director arrested for swindling Rs 345 croreThe court, however, asked Bhagmal to furnish a bail bond of Rs 50,000 with one surety of the like amount. It further directed retired naval officer Bhagmal not to leave India without prior intimation to the court. On April 15, the court had called for a medical report on Balwan Khokhar after it was informed that the convict broke his hand after a fall in the jail. The court had on that day refused to grant bail to co-convict Girdhari Lal. The trio and two others were held guilty in a case relating to the murder of five members of a family in Raj Nagar area of Delhi Cantonment on November 1, 1984, a day after the assassination of then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi.  Also Read – Man who cheated 20 women on matrimonial websites arrestedThey also challenged their conviction and award of life sentence by the trial court in May 2013. The trial court had acquitted Congress leader Sajjan Kumar in the case but awarded life term to Bhagmal, Khokhar and Girdhari Lal. The court had also awarded three years jail term to two others — former MLA Mahender Yadav and Kishan Khokhar.  The high court had in September 2013 denied bail to Bhagmal. The convicts have filed their appeals before the HC while CBI has also filed an appeal demanding death sentence for the trio, saying they were engaged in “a planned communal riot” and “religious cleansing”.last_img read more