Cheap HDMI cables work fine probably

first_img Tags HDMI just works, or it doesn’t There is no difference between an HDMI cable that just barely works and one that expensively overbuilt. If the cable is able to transmit 4K HDR from your source to your TV, it works. That’s all it needs to do. If it cuts in and out, then it doesn’t work (or at best, doesn’t work for that application). This has to do with how HDMI cables transmit data. They are, in essence, a pipe, just like the pipes in your house. If you’re getting the right water pressure and temperature in the bathroom, the pipes work. If you replace them with gold-plated pipes, you’re not suddenly going to get showers of vodka. This is essentially what expensive HDMI cables are promising. The idea when buying HDMI cables should be: get the least expensive cable that works. When it comes to modern 4K HDR TVs, this requires a slightly better cable than an old 1080p, TV, but thankfully the prices are all so low this effectively doesn’t matter. Related on CNET Four great 4K TVs for every budget HDMI 2.1 is here, but don’t worry about it now When should I upgrade my HDMI cables? How HDR works Which HDMI cable do you need? 5 Comments 2:18center_img Share your voice That caveat, though… You’ve probably noticed that throughout this article I’ve hedged a bit. That’s because not all cheap HDMI cables will work. Older, or poorly made, cheap HDMI cables might not be capable of the bandwidth required to transmit 4K HDR. It’s important to realize that just because one $5 cable didn’t work that doesn’t mean a different $5 cable won’t work. It also doesn’t mean that if the $5 cable didn’t work, you have to get a $50 cable. You likely have HDMI cables already. It’s entirely possible these will work with your new TV. But then again, they might not. The only way to know for sure is to test them out. If your source (a media streamer, 4K Blu-ray player, etc), is sending a 4K HDR signal, and your TV says it’s getting a 4K HDR signal, you’re all set. The cable works. No other cable will make the image look, or make the sound, better. If your setup doesn’t work, check all your gear’s settings before you consider new cables.Monoprice and Amazon HDMI cables, two inexpensive choices that can handle 4K HDR signals for just a few dollars a foot. Monoprice and Amazon If you still need new cables, your best bet is to stick with the big names in cheap cables, like Monoprice and Amazon. Both sell HDMI cables that cost just a few dollars a foot, and are capable of transmitting 4K HDR. We have a buying guide for those, plus a few other options, at “Which HDMI cable do you need?”If you need longer cables, those will cost a bit more, and over 15 feet/3 meters, you should consider active cables. These use a bit of power in the HDMI connection to boost the signal over longer distances. Even with this added tech, they should only cost you around $2 a foot. Save your money It’s amazing to me that the HDMI up-sell still goes on. Just last week I received a tweet asking about silver HDMI cables. I told him that no, despite what he was told, he didn’t need a $140 HDMI cable to connect his new TV. When we, as humans, seem programmed to believe that if something is more expensive it must be better, it’s easy for companies to take advantage. Don’t fall for it. Got a question for Geoff? First, check out all the other articles he’s written on topics like why all HDMI cables are the same, TV resolutions explained, LED LCD vs. OLED and more. Still have a question? Tweet at him @TechWriterGeoff, then check out his travel photography on Instagram. He also thinks you should check out his best-selling sci-fi novel and its sequel.  Now playing: Watch this: If you just bought a new TV, chances are you might feel the need to get expensive new HDMI cables. Resist the temptation.Even with Ultra HD 4K resolution, high dynamic range, and wide color gamut, you don’t need expensive HDMI cables. It’s probably that your current HDMI cables could work fine, but if they don’t, no matter what a salesperson tells you, you don’t need to spend more than a few dollars/pounds/euros a foot (0.3m). Even over long runs of 15ft/3m or more, you shouldn’t have to spend a lot. Some stores are still hyping “high-end” HDMI cables with all sorts of fancy buzzwords, but you don’t need them. They won’t improve performance or allow additional features compared to the right cheap HDMI cables. The only cable features you need are “18 Gbps,” which is how much they need to transmit 4K HDR, and maybe “Certified Premium.” This label is found on cables that are guaranteed to work with 4K HDR. A cable might work if it doesn’t have this logo, but should almost certainly work if it does. Fortunately, there are plenty of cheap cables with these features. TVs Audio Home Entertainment HDMIlast_img read more

Meghan Markle holds a secret meeting with a Doctor is the Duchess

first_imgMeghan MarkleGetty ImagesMeghan Markle sure is taking her Royal responsibilities seriously, the Duchess reportedly held a secret meeting with Dr. Joanna Newman at Kensington Palace, according to the Court Circular.It is being reported that Dr. Newman is chief executive and secretary general of the Association of Commonwealth Universities, one of Meghan’s royal patronages which were announced in January. The meeting came weeks before Meghan is due to give birth to her and Prince Harry’s first child.It is not yet known what the meeting was about exactly but if Meghan is already having secret meetings about her recent patronages, then we have to assume she is taking her Royal duties very seriously. Meghan Markle is expected to give birth in April.Meghan Markle also met her childhood friend Katharine McPhee. Apparently, the former American Idol star knows the Duchess well as they spent their youth together performing in musicals.  Meghan MarkleGetty ImagesAccording to People, the friends managed to grab a quick chat during last week’s WE Day.And speaking to the Evening Standard, Ms McPhee gave a quick update on how Meghan was getting on.She said: “She was lovely, and she remembered me – she remembered my sister more specifically because they were in the same class.”She said ‘I’m just sitting around waiting for the baby to come’.”Reportedly Meghan Markle said that her bump was treating her “very well” as she attended a panel discussion to mark International Women’s Day.Meghan Markle still seems quite down to earth, even in between her royal duties, she finds the time to spend with her commoner friends. Even though they are famous in their own right.last_img read more

Connecticut WWIIEra Newspapers Offer View of Black Life

first_imgBy Susan Haigh, The Associated PressA detailed account of African-American life in the Northeast during World War II, carefully preserved in the basement of the Connecticut State Library, has been uploaded for a new, modern readership.Hunched over a lighted magnifying machine, Christine Gauvreau spent months scrolling through reels of microfilm of Black-owned and operated Connecticut newspapers, preparing them to be digitized. They’re some of the latest entrants in the Chronicling America project, a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress to create a national digital database of historically significant U.S. newspapers published between 1690 and 1963.This Nov. 29, 2018 photo shows an original April 23, 1949 copy of the New England Bulletin, Black-owned and operated weekly newspaper in Hartford, Conn. Old microfilm of this and other incarnations of the newspaper are being digitized so they can be available online as part of the United States Newspaper Program. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)“It’s really a document from the very early civil rights movement in Hartford,” said Gauvreau, who recently finished archiving old issues of the now-defunct Connecticut Chronicle, Hartford Chronicle, Hartford-Springfield Chronicle and New England Bulletin, a family of Black-owned and operated newspapers that began in 1940 and operated consecutively for about a decade.Connecticut’s latest additions to Chronicling America mark the first African-American newspapers added to the project from a Northeast state.The four Connecticut-based weekly newspapers upheld a “crusade tradition” of journalism, Gauvreau said. They pushed for the hiring of Hartford’s first Black firefighters and Black bus drivers; advocated for a law barring racial bias in the National Guard; and exposed substandard housing, inferior quality goods and high prices in Harford’s North End neighborhood. In an April 23, 1949 article, the New England Bulletin criticized the “vacillating stand” taken by Connecticut’s State Board of Education, which agreed to allow public high school field trips to “jimcro” Washington D.C. “even though Negro students are segregated” at certain hotels.In a front page editorial published in May 14, 1949, readers were urged to write to the State Board of Education ask members to “STOP PASSING THE BUCK” and prove “beyond a shadow of a doubt that the board is very much against segregation.” The editorial said the New England Bulletin was taking a stand and criticizing the board for allowing the trips because the decision was “contradictory to the forward-looking policies of the state with regard to any kind of racial injustice.”An Oct. 5, 1946 column by James E. Shankel, editor of the Hartford Chronicle at the time, wrote about “bare-faced racial discrimination” in Connecticut. He noted a member of a New Haven church had come across a letter from an East Haddam developer advertising lakefront lots for sale and how “this summer colony is restricted to the Caucasian race.”“Obviously, this advertising letter form was never intended to fall into the hands of prospective Negro buyers,” Shankel wrote.Other pages of the newspapers provide a window into the culture of the time. Articles cover everything from an Easter sermon at Mount Calvary Baptist Church to performances by musical greats. One advertisement announces a scheduled performance by iconic jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald at the State Theater in Hartford. Written by correspondents stationed throughout the state and region, many articles chronicle the accomplishments of Black residents. One headline announces “City’s Only Army Nurse Returns,” a reference to a Black nurse from Hartford who was honorably discharged from the Army Nursing Corps.“They wanted to tell the story about what was happening in Black Hartford. They also wanted to highlight issues of discrimination. They wanted to celebrate Black achievement at the same time,” said historian and Professor Stacey K. Close, the associate provost and vice president of equity and diversity at Eastern Connecticut State University. “During World War II, there was a push to improve the employment of African-Americans in terms of the city and the state. And this newspaper took up the challenge.”There was also an effort by the newspapers to make the readers aware of what was happening elsewhere, especially in the southern states where many still had family members.“They also made sure that young people knew what was going on in the rest of the country,” Close said.He added “there was an urgency” to what the newspapers were doing.“They were trying to push the city to do better than they had done in the past,” he said. “They were an organization and a paper pushing for social, economic and political change.”last_img read more

3D printing electrically assisted nacreinspired structures with selfsensing capabilities

first_img , Advanced Healthcare Materials Materials theory combines strength, stiffness and toughness of composites into a single design map Citation: 3-D printing electrically assisted, nacre-inspired structures with self-sensing capabilities (2019, April 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-d-electrically-nacre-inspired-self-sensing-capabilities.html Proof-of-principle self-sensing capability of 3D printed, nacre-inspired helmet on a mini Lego bicycle rider. 3-D printed helmet with 2 wt% aGN (aligned graphene nanoplatelets), LED light is ON. Brightness decreases with crack deflection during compressive tests and resistance increases (RC circuit). When resistance increases due to crack propagation the LED turns off. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aau9490 , Science © 2019 Science X Network The 3D-printing process. (A) Nacre model by SolidWorks (from Dassault Systèmes), sliced using the DMD-based stereolithography software to generate projection patterns. (B) rGNs are aligned by the electric field (blue dotted arrow shows the direction) to form aGNs during the 3D-printing process, the aligned composites solidify after light exposure (yellow part), the alignment of GNs is kept in the composites, after the layer is complete the building plate is peeled to print additional layers with aGNs. (C) Compression of natural nacre and SEM images of the fracture surface, showing crack deflection (yellow arrowheads) and crack branching (red arrowheads) in (D) and crack deflection between layers in (E). (F) 3D-printed nacre with 2 wt % aGNs under loading with crack deflection and branching in (G). (H) SEM image showing deflection between layers (yellow arrowheads). Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aau9490. To align the GNs in the composite during layer-based 3-D printing, Yang et al. used an electric field (433 V/cm) to build nacre-inspired MJ/GN composite structures. The scientists applied DC voltages, followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) collection, optical imaging and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images to characterize (i.e. test) the newly developed composites. The resulting parallel and closely packed GN sample layers were structurally separated by the polymer matrix in between as mortar to impart the critical structural features for mechanical performance in the 3-D synthetic nacre. The scientists saw similarities between the synthetic vs. natural nacre structure at the macro- and microscale. Prior to 3-D printing, Yang et al. created the nacre model using SolidWorks software first, and then sliced it with in-house developed digital micromirror device (DMD)-based stereolithography software to generate surface patterns. They projected masked images of the computed patterns on the resin surface to construct layers in which the electrically assisted 3-D printing process aligned and selectively polymerized the programmed parts for specific reinforcement orientation, layer upon each layer of the MJ/GN composites to create the structure of interest. The scientists formed the desired gap between the GN alignment in the MJ resin, prior to photocuration using the DMD light projection system (3.16 mW/cm2) available in the setup. LEFT: Mechanical property and microstructure study of 3D-printed nacre. (A) Comparison of compression properties of the 3D-printed nacre with different loadings and alignments. (B) Crack propagation in MJ/rGNs nacre with the breaking of rGNs. (C and F) Simulations of stress distribution of MJ/rGNs and MJ/aGNs by COMSOL Multiphysics, respectively. (D) Comparison of maximum compression load for the 3D-printed nacre with different mass ratios of GNs. (E) Crack deflection of MJ/aGNs nacre and bridging and interlocking of aGNs. RIGHT: Comparison of fracture toughness by three-point bending test. (A to C) Compression force versus resistance change for pure MJ, MJ/2 wt % rGNs, and MJ/2 wt % aGNs, respectively (with inset SEM images showing the related fracture surfaces). (D) Comparison of fracture toughness for crack initiation (KIC) and stable crack propagation (KJC) of the 3D-printed nacre with the natural nacre. (E) Comparison of specific toughness and specific strength of the 3D-printed nacre with others’ work (inset shows the specific strength with density for various nacre-inspired composites). R-curves of the 3D-printed nacre (F) and the natural nacre (G). Simulations of stress distribution by COMSOL Multiphysics for the 3D-printed nacre with rGNs (H) and aGNs (I). Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aau9490. Explore further Journal information: Science Advances They then compared the stress-strain behavior of the 3-D printed nacre with rGNs (random) and aGNs (aligned) for different ratios. Compared to natural nacre, the synthetic version showed typical brittle fractures with crack propagation at first. Yang et al. used structural simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics to show the site of stress concentration and the importance of accurate GN alignment for crack deflection and energy dissipation in the synthetic nacres. When they conducted structural simulations of optimized aGN sheets with 2 percent weight in the study (2 wt %), they showed the formation of bridges that lead to stress distribution at the joint area between the aGNs and polymer matrix to carry loads instead of promoting macroscopic crack advancement. The structures contained covalent bonding, hydrogen bonding and π-π interaction to synergistically bridge the aGNs for enhanced biomechanical properties. To test the mechanical properties, the scientists conducted three-point bending tests to measure the toughness of 3-D printed composites with rGNs, aGNs and a reference pure polymer sample. After adequate GN alignment they obtained stable crack arrest and deflection comparable to natural nacre, by toughening the brick-like platelets. The results indicated resistance to fracture during crack growth for aGNs. The nacre-inspired aGN composites showed bridging and interlocking that translated to an increase in dissipated energy and toughening, contributing to the outstanding crack arrest performance of the composite. The synthetic 3-D nacre was more lightweight than natural nacre, with lower density compared to the previous synthetic composites. The 3-D synthetic version showed significantly improved electrical conductivity contrary to natural nacre, which Yang et al. tested using piezoresistive responses useful for self-sensing military and sports applications. As a proof-of-principle, the scientists designed a wearable 3-D helmet for a Lego bicycle rider using the technique to study its self-sensing capability. The helmet composed of aGNs showed improved impact and compression resistance compared with rGNs, verified with impact tests where the rGN helmets broke while the aGN helmets retained their shapes. Yang et al. showed that a helmet composed with aGNs (0.36 g) connected to an LED light was able to sustain the impact of an iron ball 305 times its weight (110 g), where the brightness of the LED light only decreased slightly after the impact due to crack formation, energy dissipation and increased resistance. center_img 3D-printed smart helmet with anisotropic electrical property. (A) Anisotropic electrical property of the 3D-printed nacre. (B) Changes of electrical resistance with different GNs loadings and alignments. (C) Schematic diagram showing the layered polymer/GNs structure with anisotropic electrical resistance. (D) 3D-printing process of a self-sensing smart helmet. Demonstration of the wearable sensor on a Lego bicycle rider showing different self-sensing properties for the 3D-printed helmets with rGNs (E) and aGNs (F). (G) Circuit design for the tests. Compression force of the 3D-printed helmets with related compression displacements and resistance changes for rGNs (H) and aGNs (I), respectively. (Photo credit: Yang Yang, Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Southern California.). Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aau9490. Schematic diagram of the electrically assisted 3D-printing platform for the construction of nacre-inspired structures. (A) Diagram of the electrically assisted 3D-printing device. (B) Illustration of the bottom-up projection-based stereolithography process. (C and D) Schematic diagrams show the alignment of GNs under the electric field and alignment mechanisms, respectively. (E) 3D-printed nacre with aGNs and SEM images showing surface and cross-section morphology: DMD, digital micromirror device; PDMS, polydimethylsiloxane. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aau9490 More information: Yang Yang et al. Electrically assisted 3-D printing of nacre-inspired structures with self-sensing capability, Science Advances (2019). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aau9490 L. J. Bonderer et al. Bioinspired Design and Assembly of Platelet Reinforced Polymer Films, Science (2008). DOI: 10.1126/science.1148726 Shanshan Yao et al. Nanomaterial-Enabled Wearable Sensors for Healthcare, Advanced Healthcare Materials (2017). DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700889 K. J. Koester et al. The true toughness of human cortical bone measured with realistically short cracks, Nature Materials (2008). DOI: 10.1038/nmat2221 The scientists constructed a resistor-capacitor (RC) circuit to measure the changing resistance during the impact and during compression tests. In the rGN helmet the LED was always off due to the larger resistance, comparatively the smaller resistance of the aGN helmet left the LED light turned on. In this way, Yang et al. showed how the nano-laminated architecture provided extrinsic toughening and enhanced electrical conductivity due to bioinspired, aligned GNs in the nanocomposites. They propose to enable mass customization, assisted with 3-D printing capabilities to translate the lightweight smart materials ingrained with excellent mechanical and electrical properties for commercially viable applications in widespread industries. Nacre, also known as mother of pearl is a composite, organic-inorganic material produced in nature in the inner shell layer of molluscs and the outer coating of pearls. The material is resilient and iridescent with high strength and toughness, resulting from its brick-and-mortar-like architecture. Lightweight and strong materials are of interest in materials science due to their potential in multidisciplinary applications in sports, aerospace, transportation and biomedicine. In a recent study, now published in Science Advances, Yang Yang and co-workers at the interdisciplinary departments of Systems Engineering, Chemical, Biomedical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Southern California, developed a route to build nacre-inspired hierarchical structures with complex 3-D shapes via electrically assisted 3-D printing. The scientists propose to develop a smart helmet with inbuilt protective, self-sensing capabilities using the electrically assisted 3-D printing process. The bioinspired brick and mortar (BM) architecture can enhance mechanical strength and electrical conduction by aligning graphene nanoplatelets in each layer for maximum performance via crack deflection under loading. In total, Yang et al. aim to engineer multifunctional, lightweight yet strong and electrically self-sensing 3-D structures from the lab to industry. To replicate the challenging hierarchical, micro-/nano-scale architecture of natural nacre, the scientists used aGNs in a photocurable polymer, grafted with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) to strengthen the interface and load transfer at the sandwich-like polymer matrix. For the photocurable resin, they used G+ resin from Maker Juice Labs, notated MJ, containing high tensile epoxy diacrylate, glycol diacrylate and a photoinitiator with excellent mechanical properties and low viscosity. , Nature Materials In the present work, Yang et al. presented an electrically assisted 3-D printing method using aligned graphene nanoplatelets (GNs) in photocurable resin to build the nacre-inspired hierarchical architectures. The proposed technique took advantage of the nanoscale-to-microscale assembly induced by the electric field and microscale-to-macroscale assembly via 3-D printing. The 3-D architectures with aligned GNs (aGNs) showed reinforced mechanical properties compared to random GNs (rGNs). The 3-D printed artificial nacre displayed specific toughness and strength comparable to natural nacre, with additional anisotropic electric properties unlike the natural nacre. To create a brick-and-mortar-like structure in the work, they aligned graphene nanoplatelets (GNs) as bricks in the electric field (433 V/cm) during 3-D printing and included the polymer matrix as a mortar. The bioinspired 3-D printed nacre with aligned GNs (2 percent weight) were lightweight (1.06 g/cm3), albeit with specific toughness and strength similar to the natural nacre counterpart. The 3-D printed lightweight, smart armor aligned GNs could sense surface damage to exert resistance change during electrical applications. The study highlighted interesting possibilities for bioinspired nanomaterials with hierarchical architecture tested in a proof-of-principle, mini smart helmet. Projected applications include integrated mechanical reinforcement, electrical self-sensing capabilities in biomedicine, aerospace engineering as well as military and sports appliances. Lightweight and strong structural materials such as multifunctional wearable sensors have attracted increasing attention in health monitoring, but most piezoelectric sensors are soft and cannot protect the surface of interest. A protective, multifunctional wearable sensor is currently in demand for military and sports applications therefore. The hierarchical structure of nacre in nature provides superior mechanical performance, notwithstanding its relatively weak constituents to protect the soft body in molluscs. The secret to its protective capability is inherent to its brick and mortar (BM) architecture that ranges from the nano- and micro- to macroscale. This outstanding materials property formed the basis to design light and strong armor for microstructural interfaces in materials science. Although traditional, bottom-up assembly processes such as vacuum filtration, spray coating, ice templating and self-assembly were previously studied intensively to build nacre-inspired architectures, the methods only focused on two-dimensional (2-D) thin-film formation or simple bulk structures. Since it is challenging to use these techniques to develop 3-D architectures – 3-D printing (additive manufacture) is a powerful alternative. Recent studies in materials science and bioengineering have used 3-D printing with shear forces, magnetic and acoustic fields to form reinforced composites with aligned fibers. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more