Returning to the Walled Garden

first_imgWith print losses mounting, and online ad revenues not living up to expectations, some publishers are returning to the idea of monetizing editorial content online. In April, Court TV and American Lawyer founder Steve Brill, along with former Wall Street Journal publisher L. Gordon Crovitz and media exec Leo Hindery Jr., created Journalism Online, an ambitious initiative to build an automated system that will allow magazine and newspaper publishers to charge subscription fees for online content.Charging for content online may not be feasible for all publishers but may at least be worth considering. Here’s how three publishers have successfully implemented online paid content models.August Home PublishingPlansNow.comGiving away content for free online has been “a big mistake,” according to August Home Publishing founder Don Peschke. He’s been charging for content online for more than 15 years and says within five years those revenues could make up as much as 50 percent of the company’s total revenue. August Home could become “entirely electronic” if those projections become reality, he says. “This is the electronic, paid delivery of content—editorial delivered via the Web, e-mail and mobile,” Peschke adds. “This isn’t about PDFs or anything that resembles a magazine page. We’re developing new graphic presentation formats that incorporate text, photos, video, animation and audio, and fit wide computer monitors. It’s about being dynamically interactive.”In 1994—after launching Garden Gate, Cuisine at Home and Workbench—Peschke took Woodsmith online with the intention of selling its content.The move online was an important one for August Home since, until this year, only Workbench carried print advertising (and it will stop doing that as of the June 2009 issue). “We signed up members who paid an annual subscription fee to purchase woodworking plans, which were PDFs of articles from Woodsmith,” Peschke says.Two years later, in 1996, August Home began charging a per-download fee. “This was not a membership program, rather a pay-per-download format,” he says. “By 2008, we were selling approximately 100 to 150 plans a day, at a price range of $4.95 to $12.95. Woodworking plans do well because the average price point, which is $9.95, works for typical single-purchase credit card transactions.”Last December, Peschke expanded the model by launching a paid membership component for a site called PlansNow.com, which was divided into three pay levels: “Classic” free membership, “Gold” for $19.95 per year, and “Platinum” for $29.95 per year. “It’s growing ahead of our original projections and we anticipate 10,000 members by the end of the year,” Peschke says.Next, August Home is looking into developing similar paid community models for its cooking and gardening verticals. The communities will either require memberships, micropayments or both, Peschke says.August Home’s Model: Charges per-download fees for work plans, plus paid membership subscriptions ranging from $19.95-$29.95 per year.The Pay-Off: August Home sells 100-150 plans per day. Online revenues are projected to make up 50 percent of the company’s overall revenue within five years. Aviation WeekAviation Week Intelligence NetworkAviation Week has a long history of charging for its content. Launched more than 90 years ago, the print magazine has always had a paid model, today charging more than $100 for an annual subscription. The magazine also has a portfolio of paid newsletters—including Aerospace Daily & Defense Report, Aviation Daily and the Weekly of Business Aviation—with pricing ranging from $649 to $1,785 per year.Aviation Week Intelligence Network, the magazine’s online destination for premium paid content, launched in 2002, initially as a virtual library, after being approached by Boeing. “They said, ‘we get all of your products and it would make our lives easier if you could put all of these in one place,’” says Anne McMahon, Aviation Week’s group director of information marketing services. “Shortly after launching as a virtual library of magazine and newsletter content, we realized that it was something other customers would be interested in as well.”Today, AWIN has more than 2,000 paid accounts—including individuals and enterprise accounts for companies and organizations such as Lockheed Martin, NASA and the U.S. Department of Transportation. It features a multiple-tiered pay plan “allowing subscribers access to as much or as little information as they need,” McMahon says. Single “seat” subscriptions range from $900 to $3,545, while enterprise and group sub prices vary according to the number of users.In terms of content, AWIN provides subscribers access to more than 250,000 articles, details on more than 21,000 companies, contact information for nearly 70,000 industry professionals, 13,000 tables and charts, and specification data on 3,100 products. “We often package newsletter delivery and/or magazines depending upon the customers’ needs,” McMahon says.AWIN usage has grown 20 percent since December, McMahon says. Looking forward, Aviation Week plans to build out each of AWIN’s vertical channels with more data and analytics. “The nature of the business is in developing databases and delivering on the media side some of the connectivity advertisers are looking for. There’s a place there for paid content,” she says. “AWIN represents an asset for professionals who are serious about doing business, and want serious content in one place. I see that increasing.”Aviation Week’s Model: Created a paid premium content site featuring multiple-tired pay plans.The Pay-Off: AWIN has more than 2,000 paid accounts, including individuals and enterprise accounts. Usage is up 20 percent since December.Chemical Businsess MediaChemweek.com, CHE.comAccess Intelligence’s Chemical Business Media switched its Chemical Week and Chemical Engineering Web sites to a paid content model in 2007. Since then, the group has generated 30,000 new customers which helped stop a 30-year revenue slide.“We had a paid content system before, but not a smart one,” says John Rockwell, vice president of marketing and e-media. “While we’re requiring that people register, we also dramatically improved the user experience—in terms of making access to the content as easy as possible—which, we think, balances the perceived trade-off.”Nearly all content at Chemweek.com is accessed only by subscription, with prices ranging from $200 to “several thousand dollars” annually for e-newsletters, white papers and other “high value” services, Rockwell says. Chemical Engineering’s CHE.com features some free areas, accessed only when users register. Roughly 6 percent of those free users convert to paid subscribers.Overall, conversions and renewals at both sites rose 15 percent. Revenue per subscriber increased 14 percent, while unique visitors rose by 225 percent.“If your brand is strong enough as a news analysis source, especially in the b-to-b space, then I say go for it,” says Rockwell. “It’s about making every customer touch count. If you’re not, you’re leaving money on the table. We’ve been lucky in that we’ve been able to turn users into subscribers, and scoop up more market share. In this down economy, I’ll take it.”CBM’s Model: Chemweek.com and CHE.com users pay annual subscription fees ranging from $200 to “several thousand dollars” for access to e-newsletters, white papers and other “high value” services.The Pay-Off: CBM has generated 30,000 new customers which helped stop a 30-year slide in total revenue and revenue per customer.last_img read more

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT 4 Wilmington Students Named To Deans List At University Of Maine

first_imgORONO, ME — The University of Maine recognized 2,388 students for achieving Dean’s List honors in the Fall 2018 semester.The following Wilmington students received Dean’s List honors for fall 2018, completing 12 or more credit hours in the semester and earning a grade point average of 3.5 or higher:Rose CrispinJillian DoyleJocelyn FerraroShannon Smith(NOTE: The above announcement is from the University of Maine.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Thank You To Our Sponsor:Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 5 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At University Of MaineIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 6 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At Bridgewater State UniversityIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 6 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At University of New EnglandIn “Education”last_img read more

Why you should use dark mode on the iPhone

first_img See It Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X $999 Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 1 See it Now playing: Watch this: Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? $999 Are there any negatives? Not that we know of — not any real health consequences, anyway. A few potential downsides to inverted color schemes include: Very small text and long blocks of text may be harder to readPeople with certain kinds of color blindness may find it harder to useMay be hard to see in dimly lit environments  Should you use it? If you look at your phone screen for a substantial amount of time each day, there’s a chance you could benefit from using dark mode. For the best results, try enabling Dark Mode and Night Shift (Settings > Display & Brightness > Night Shift) to reduce as much blue light as possible. There are no real consequences from using Dark Mode, but a few great benefits to consider, so when Apple rolls it out for iPhone in September, give it a shot and note any differences in your vision, sleep or headaches.  2:45 Apple iPhone XS Dark Mode comes to Apple iOS CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Apple The benefits of dark mode Apple introduced dark mode for Mac in 2018. At the time, creative professionals raved about the feature, as it’s sleek and makes photos and text pop on the black background. But aside from creative potential, the obvious benefit is that dark mode helps protects your eyes from the traditionally blinding whiteness of computer and phone screens. Even with features like Night Shift, which softens harsh blue light and wearing blue-light blocking glasses, bright white tech screens can still cause blurry vision, headaches and watery eyes. For many, dark mode may alleviate those symptoms. Reducing the amount of blue light you come into contact with throughout the day may also help you sleep better. Additionally, dark mode for iOS might increase your iPhone’s battery life. It takes less power for OLED screens to emit dark colors than a bright ones, so while Apple hasn’t yet made any claims that Dark Mode saves battery, there’s a good chance that it will give you more time before you need to plug in again. However, this is only true for OLED screens (organic light-emitting diode) and not LCD (liquid crystal display) screens. In OLED screens, every individual pixel lights up to create an image. So when you turn on Dark Mode, your phone just shuts off the pixels it doesn’t need — versus an LCD screen, which uses a backlight regardless of color scheme. Only the newest iPhones use OLED, so this trick won’t work for you if you use any model from the 8 Plus or earlier. More iPhones with OLED screens are expected to come out next year. See It 9 Photos Share your voice Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean itcenter_img See It Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR Sprint reading • Why you should use dark mode on the iPhone Dark Mode in the calendar app James Martin/CNET Apple announced at WWDC 2019 that it is bringing Dark Mode to iOS to give anyone with an iPhone the chance to use the alternative color scheme. Until this year, Dark Mode was only available with MacOS on Mac computers. The new feature is currently in Apple’s beta iOS and should be available with iOS 13, which will come out with the newest iPhone in September. What is dark mode? Like its name implies, dark mode darkens the user interface on Apple devices. Basically, the appearance is inverted so that instead of black text on a white background, you see light or white text on a black background. The feature is system-wide, so all native Apple apps will support dark mode, and so will your notifications and widgets. Plus, Dark Mode will be available for third-party developers to make it part of their app. The effect is most noticeable on apps where the majority appears white, such as Apple Health and Calendar. Read more: Dark mode is coming to iOS 13, but these iPhone apps have it now Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Tags Boost Mobile Comment • See All $999 Wellness $999 Dark mode for iOS 13: iPhone’s dark side never looked so good Best Buy Applelast_img read more

3rd Annual Outside the Walls Back to School Service

first_imgOn Aug. 21 at 10 a.m. Christian Liberty Church is having its back to school drive service. Free backpacks and school supplies will be given out. The annual outdoor worship service will be led by the youth and followed by free giveaways of backpacks, back to school supplies and children’s clothing. The event is free with food, games for kids, moon bounce, face painting and more. The event will be held at Frederick Douglass High School, 2301 Gwynns Falls Parkway, Baltimore, Md. 21217.last_img

Mendelson Offers Free Back to School Haircuts

first_imgBy James Wright, Special to the AFRO, jwright@afro.comThe chairman of the D.C. Council offered young people in Ward 8 a chance to look good on the first day of school. D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson (D) paid for free haircuts from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Aug. 13 at the popular Davis Barber and Beauty Services on Livingston Road, S.E. in Ward 8. This is Mendelson’s third year of paying for haircuts.“Getting a fresh haircut is a positive message to kids about going to school,” the chairman told the AFRO. “This will help low-income families with preparing their children for school.”Derek Davis provided free haircuts for kids at his barber shop in Washington, D.C. (Courtesy photo)Free haircuts have become commonplace among “Back-to-School” activities in the District of Columbia. Barbers donate their services and generally give free basic haircuts at school sites and in their shops.Davis Barber is a product of the Willie Davis family, which started the shop in 1968. The late Willie Davis was known to run a professional establishment focused on serving the needs of the customer in a clean environment.Willie Davis was a respected barber on the national level and in 2009 he was elected to the National Association of Barber Board of America Hall of Fame.His son, Derek, a retired District of Columbia Public School educator, manages the shop, with his sibling Marsten and is a prominent African-American barber. Derek Davis was elected president of the National Association of Barber Boards of America in 2013 and has served as the chairman of the District of Columbia’s Barber and Cosmetology Board.Marsten teaches barbering at Ballou Stay High School, an alternative institution for people who have dropped out for various reasons. He also works in the shop during opening hours.Some of the barbers in the shop have been with Davis for decades.Derek Davis told the AFRO that his family believes in giving back to the community. “We want to give something back and Ward 8 has been good to us,” Davis said. “We can afford to give free haircuts to young people so they can look nice for school.”Davis admitted that the free haircuts also serve as a vehicle to getting new customers.Among the patrons that Davis Barber has had over the years is a former mayor of the District.“Marion Barry used to come here to get his hair cut,” Davis said of the late political icon. “He was a good customer and some members of my family would socialize with him at The Players’ Lounge.Twenty families had their sons’ hair worked on while book bags and other school supplies were handed out. Monica McLamore lives in the immediate area of Davis Barber and regularly participates in the free hair cut event. “I bring my boys to this every year and this is the third year for us,” McLamore told the AFRO. “This prepares them for school and it helps economically.”Helping people is precisely why Mendelson does this. “This barbershop is part of the neighborhood and anything I can do to help the community I will certainly try to do,” he said.last_img read more