The piece released Wednesday shows Kolb on 217

first_imgThe piece, released Wednesday, shows Kolb, on 217 drop backs, has been given 2.84 seconds before he’s gotten rid of the ball. Skelton, on 187 drop backs, has had 2.64 seconds. Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Top Stories However, that only takes into account the passes the quarterbacks got off. The site’s research shows Kolb, who has been sacked 27 times this season, has had a league-worst 2.49 seconds from the time the ball was snapped to when he was dropped by a defender. Skelton, who has been taken down 14 times this season, has been given 2.64 seconds before a defender got to him.So, what does this show? Besides the line apparently blocking marginally better for Skelton than Kolb, it makes one wonder how the injured Cardinals signal caller was even able to be as effective as he was, given the fact that he was under immediate pressure seemingly every time he dropped back to pass.As ProFootballFocus put it, “Nobody warrants your sympathy more than Kevin Kolb who was not helped by a pass protection unit that saw his average sack coming within 2.3 seconds of the ball being snapped.” Comments   Share   Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Thanks to the sack tracker (and our eyes), we know both Kevin Kolb and John Skelton have been sacked often this season.And now, due to the hard work by the folks at ProFootballFocus.com, we’re aware of just how little time Arizona’s passers have had to throw the football.Now to explain what ‘time to throw’ is, we record the time from when the ball is snapped to the point where the quarterback has either thrown a pass or can no longer throw a pass (has been sacked or scrambled past the line of scrimmage). The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

Top stories Computers that think like humans research chimps that cant retire

first_img Email By Ryan CrossJun. 16, 2017 , 2:15 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country (Left to right): C.Bickel/Science; SHELBY KNOWLES; v_alex/iStockphoto Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Computers are starting to reason like humansHow many parks are near the new home you’re thinking of buying? What’s the best dinner-wine pairing at a restaurant? These everyday questions require relational reasoning, an important component of higher thought that has been difficult for artificial intelligence to master. Now, researchers at Google’s DeepMind have developed a simple algorithm to handle such reasoning—and it has already beaten humans at a complex image comprehension test.Curiosity and irritation meet Macron’s effort to lure foreign scientists to France Top stories: Computers that ‘think’ like humans, research chimps that can’t retire, and a protein that can halt the flu Hours after U.S. President Donald Trump announced that the United States was withdrawing from the Paris climate accord, French President Emmanuel Macron pledged to “make our planet great again” by intensifying efforts to combat climate change—and inviting U.S. researchers who might be unhappy with Trump to work in France. The French government then unveiled a website aimed at attracting foreign scientists with 4-year grants worth up to €1.5 million each. The move has irritated some French scientists, who say it raises concerns about their nation’s commitment to homegrown science.China’s quantum satellite achieves ‘spooky action’ at record distanceQuantum entanglement—physics at its strangest—has moved out of this world and into space. In a study that shows China’s growing mastery of both the quantum world and space science, a team of physicists reports that it sent eerily intertwined quantum particles from a satellite to ground stations separated by 1200 kilometers, smashing the previous world record. The result is a stepping stone to ultrasecure communication networks and, eventually, a space-based quantum internet.Designer protein halts fluThere’s a new weapon taking shape in the war on flu, one of the globe’s most dangerous infectious diseases. Scientists have created a designer protein that stops the influenza virus from infecting cells in culture and protects mice from getting sick after being exposed to a heavy dose of the virus. It can also be used as a sensitive diagnostic. And although it isn’t ready as a treatment itself, the protein may point the way to future flu drugs, scientists say.Research on lab chimps is over. Why have so few been retired to sanctuaries?The U.S. government effectively ended all invasive research on chimpanzees in 2015 and said it would retire all the chimps it owned. Yet in the past 2 years, only 73 chimpanzees have entered sanctuaries, while nearly 600 remain in research facilities. Why has retirement been so slow? Labs have dragged their feet, sanctuaries haven’t expanded quickly enough, and the government itself didn’t have a concrete plan for retirement. The slow pace has heightened tensions between the laboratory and sanctuary communities, which are struggling to put aside decades of frigid relations to make chimpanzee retirement a reality.last_img read more