Hughes backs Stuart Armstrong

first_imgThe Southampton manager says the Scottish midfielder is doing great after he struggled at the start of the seasonScottish midfielder Stuart Armstrong scored his first goals for Southampton in the weekend.And for manager Mark Hughes, this is just the start of something great for the player.“I felt Stuart Armstrong was excellent on Saturday and it was a shame he had to come off late on because of cramp again, which we need to get to the bottom of,” Hughes told The Evening Times.ScotlandScotland needs a hero: Billy Dodds Manuel R. Medina – September 10, 2019 According to former striker, Billy Dodds his country needs a hero to inspire future generations as the team’s hope to qualify to the EURO 2020 is small.“He came back into the team lately for ourselves and has shown good intent in his work and I think that has been followed up with his performances at international level.”“He did plateau a little bit at the beginning when he was trying to get a foothold into the team and into the Premier League, but now he looks assured and confident which is a key thing for Stuart,” he added.“He needs to be confident about his form but I think he’s showing good signs in that regard which we will benefit from as Scotland did last week.”last_img read more

White tiger cub seized in Louisiana recovering at Sanctuary in Alpine

first_imgWhite tiger cub seized in Louisiana recovering at Sanctuary in Alpine Posted: January 4, 2018 January 4, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, ALPINE (KUSI) — A five-month-old white tiger cub has been seized from an unpermitted location in Louisiana and relocated to an exotic animal sanctuary in California.The orphaned female cub, who does not yet have a name, required immediate medical attention for conditions consistent with severe neglect. She is now responding well to treatment. The whereabouts of the cub’s parents are unknown.“Unfortunately, we see this all too often,” says Bobbi Brink, Founder and Director of Lions Tigers & Bears Big Cat and Exotic Animal Rescue, the accredited animal sanctuary where the tiger will now live out the rest of her life. “The exotic pet trade is a multi-billion dollar industry, often leading to illegal ownership like in this case. Many of these animals are pulled from their mothers when they are only days old. They are then subjected to very poor living conditions at the hands of individuals who quickly become overwhelmed by the level of care a full-grown wild animal requires. This in turn poses a very real threat to public health and safety.”The tiger cub arrived at Lions Tigers & Bears on December 22, 2017, where she continues to receive ongoing medical care.White tigers are not classified as a subspecies, nor are they considered albino. The lack of color in the animal’s hair follicles is referred to as leucism, a genetic mutation that occurs naturally in 1 out of every 10,000 births among Bengal tigers in the wild. White tigers in the United States can be traced back to one breeding pair brought to the country in the 1950s. Since then, white tigers have been selectively bred using various species of tigers, resulting in mixed breeds with the leucism gene. KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Returning to the Walled Garden

first_imgWith print losses mounting, and online ad revenues not living up to expectations, some publishers are returning to the idea of monetizing editorial content online. In April, Court TV and American Lawyer founder Steve Brill, along with former Wall Street Journal publisher L. Gordon Crovitz and media exec Leo Hindery Jr., created Journalism Online, an ambitious initiative to build an automated system that will allow magazine and newspaper publishers to charge subscription fees for online content.Charging for content online may not be feasible for all publishers but may at least be worth considering. Here’s how three publishers have successfully implemented online paid content models.August Home PublishingPlansNow.comGiving away content for free online has been “a big mistake,” according to August Home Publishing founder Don Peschke. He’s been charging for content online for more than 15 years and says within five years those revenues could make up as much as 50 percent of the company’s total revenue. August Home could become “entirely electronic” if those projections become reality, he says. “This is the electronic, paid delivery of content—editorial delivered via the Web, e-mail and mobile,” Peschke adds. “This isn’t about PDFs or anything that resembles a magazine page. We’re developing new graphic presentation formats that incorporate text, photos, video, animation and audio, and fit wide computer monitors. It’s about being dynamically interactive.”In 1994—after launching Garden Gate, Cuisine at Home and Workbench—Peschke took Woodsmith online with the intention of selling its content.The move online was an important one for August Home since, until this year, only Workbench carried print advertising (and it will stop doing that as of the June 2009 issue). “We signed up members who paid an annual subscription fee to purchase woodworking plans, which were PDFs of articles from Woodsmith,” Peschke says.Two years later, in 1996, August Home began charging a per-download fee. “This was not a membership program, rather a pay-per-download format,” he says. “By 2008, we were selling approximately 100 to 150 plans a day, at a price range of $4.95 to $12.95. Woodworking plans do well because the average price point, which is $9.95, works for typical single-purchase credit card transactions.”Last December, Peschke expanded the model by launching a paid membership component for a site called PlansNow.com, which was divided into three pay levels: “Classic” free membership, “Gold” for $19.95 per year, and “Platinum” for $29.95 per year. “It’s growing ahead of our original projections and we anticipate 10,000 members by the end of the year,” Peschke says.Next, August Home is looking into developing similar paid community models for its cooking and gardening verticals. The communities will either require memberships, micropayments or both, Peschke says.August Home’s Model: Charges per-download fees for work plans, plus paid membership subscriptions ranging from $19.95-$29.95 per year.The Pay-Off: August Home sells 100-150 plans per day. Online revenues are projected to make up 50 percent of the company’s overall revenue within five years. Aviation WeekAviation Week Intelligence NetworkAviation Week has a long history of charging for its content. Launched more than 90 years ago, the print magazine has always had a paid model, today charging more than $100 for an annual subscription. The magazine also has a portfolio of paid newsletters—including Aerospace Daily & Defense Report, Aviation Daily and the Weekly of Business Aviation—with pricing ranging from $649 to $1,785 per year.Aviation Week Intelligence Network, the magazine’s online destination for premium paid content, launched in 2002, initially as a virtual library, after being approached by Boeing. “They said, ‘we get all of your products and it would make our lives easier if you could put all of these in one place,’” says Anne McMahon, Aviation Week’s group director of information marketing services. “Shortly after launching as a virtual library of magazine and newsletter content, we realized that it was something other customers would be interested in as well.”Today, AWIN has more than 2,000 paid accounts—including individuals and enterprise accounts for companies and organizations such as Lockheed Martin, NASA and the U.S. Department of Transportation. It features a multiple-tiered pay plan “allowing subscribers access to as much or as little information as they need,” McMahon says. Single “seat” subscriptions range from $900 to $3,545, while enterprise and group sub prices vary according to the number of users.In terms of content, AWIN provides subscribers access to more than 250,000 articles, details on more than 21,000 companies, contact information for nearly 70,000 industry professionals, 13,000 tables and charts, and specification data on 3,100 products. “We often package newsletter delivery and/or magazines depending upon the customers’ needs,” McMahon says.AWIN usage has grown 20 percent since December, McMahon says. Looking forward, Aviation Week plans to build out each of AWIN’s vertical channels with more data and analytics. “The nature of the business is in developing databases and delivering on the media side some of the connectivity advertisers are looking for. There’s a place there for paid content,” she says. “AWIN represents an asset for professionals who are serious about doing business, and want serious content in one place. I see that increasing.”Aviation Week’s Model: Created a paid premium content site featuring multiple-tired pay plans.The Pay-Off: AWIN has more than 2,000 paid accounts, including individuals and enterprise accounts. Usage is up 20 percent since December.Chemical Businsess MediaChemweek.com, CHE.comAccess Intelligence’s Chemical Business Media switched its Chemical Week and Chemical Engineering Web sites to a paid content model in 2007. Since then, the group has generated 30,000 new customers which helped stop a 30-year revenue slide.“We had a paid content system before, but not a smart one,” says John Rockwell, vice president of marketing and e-media. “While we’re requiring that people register, we also dramatically improved the user experience—in terms of making access to the content as easy as possible—which, we think, balances the perceived trade-off.”Nearly all content at Chemweek.com is accessed only by subscription, with prices ranging from $200 to “several thousand dollars” annually for e-newsletters, white papers and other “high value” services, Rockwell says. Chemical Engineering’s CHE.com features some free areas, accessed only when users register. Roughly 6 percent of those free users convert to paid subscribers.Overall, conversions and renewals at both sites rose 15 percent. Revenue per subscriber increased 14 percent, while unique visitors rose by 225 percent.“If your brand is strong enough as a news analysis source, especially in the b-to-b space, then I say go for it,” says Rockwell. “It’s about making every customer touch count. If you’re not, you’re leaving money on the table. We’ve been lucky in that we’ve been able to turn users into subscribers, and scoop up more market share. In this down economy, I’ll take it.”CBM’s Model: Chemweek.com and CHE.com users pay annual subscription fees ranging from $200 to “several thousand dollars” for access to e-newsletters, white papers and other “high value” services.The Pay-Off: CBM has generated 30,000 new customers which helped stop a 30-year slide in total revenue and revenue per customer.last_img read more

This UFO on Google Street View is likely a butterfly

first_img Sci-Tech Google Maps 52 Photos Crazy images caught on Google Street View CNET’s Holiday Gift Guide: The place to find the best tech gifts for 2018.NASA turns 60: The space agency has taken humanity farther than anyone else, and it has plans to go further. Post a comment Some media outlets have been running with a story about an unidentified flying object spotted in a Google Maps image of South Florida. But a few simple clicks allow for the rather easy identification of the flying object.Granted, when looking at the Street View image at its full resolution, it does look like there’s some sort of metallic or manufactured object of alien origin emerging from behind a cloud. But simply tapping the icon to zoom in on the image twice reveals that the bizarre-looking blip is really a product of the wondrous beauty of nature combined with the imperfect nature of having to stitch together multiple images to create Google’s three-dimensional Street View snapshot of the world. The flying object is actually quite well known: a butterfly, or maybe a moth. An entomologist might be able to clear up the exact species, but the patterned wing, visible antennae and head of the insect make it pretty clear that this is a member of the Lepidoptera order rather than the kind of transport aliens from Proxima b might order up. A UFO no more! Identification complete. Any entomologists care to confirm? Google Street View Screenshot by Eric Mack / CNET What makes the picture odd appears to be that the flying bug image was cut in half because of the way Street View stitches together different stills of a landscape. In other words, the camera took one image as the presumed butterfly was beginning to pass into frame and then took an adjacent shot after the insect had flown along and the two images were joined together, producing a half-butterfly artifact.Bolstering this explanation is the fact that you can “step to the side” in Google Street View and all other elements in the scene — including the clouds — stay the same. But the half-butterfly UFO is no longer visible, having flown out of frame. Even if it was a true UFO in the image, it probably wouldn’t be the freakiest thing captured by Street View in Florida. I’d be much more worried about this alligator caught lying in wait by a rack of canoes. 0 8 Photos The year’s wackiest ‘evidence’ aliens and UFOs are real (pictures) Share your voice Tagslast_img read more

Facebook Adds TapandHold Video Recording Feature to Messenger App

first_img If you can’t buy them, join them. At least that is what Facebook is thinking.After a botched attempt at buying Snapchat, Facebook appears to have taken a cue from the startup with a new messaging feature that lets users tap and hold the camera button to record a video straight into the message.The new feature uses the selfie-side camera by default but can easily be switched to the front facing camera. The update is available on iOS and will be on Android shortly, allowing Facebook’s more than 200 million users the ability to quickly and easily make and share moments in movie form.Related: Facebook Reportedly Developing Its Own Snapchat — AgainThe Messenger update comes just days after Facebook’s direct competitor to Snapchat, Slingshot, was leaked into the app store momentarily before it was quickly taken down, TechCrunch notes. The app will supposedly allow users to write on photos and video messages before sending. But one major difference between the two is Facebook will require a reply from a user, meaning someone will have to send a message before they can view a message. This could be an issue if people on the social-media platform have yet to add the feature. But this forced response could also help Facebook boost its user base quickly.Facebook updated the Messenger app in April with the ability to send pre-recorded videos and a split screen mode that lets user take photos and send messages in the same view.Related: Facebook Lets Users Determine the Ads They Want to See 2 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Listen Now Problem Solvers with Jason Feifer Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger. June 13, 2014last_img read more

Road shut for week for emergency repairs due to gas leak

first_imgThe approximate location of the closure (marked A) (Image: Google/INRIX) Get the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailA road is set to be closed for a week following a gas leak this morning Maunders Road is shut in Milton while emergency repairs take place following reports of a leak earlier today. The street is shut in both directions at the junction with Newford Crescent – with traffic data company INRIX reporting the closure is outside The Old Bike Shed. The road is set to reopen by next Friday (February 23). A Stoke-on-Trent City Council spokesman said: “Maunders Road is closed at the junction of Newford Crescent due to a gas leak.” For more traffic and travel news visit our dedicated channel here or visit our live news service for the latest news, traffic and travel updates and weather from across Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire and South Cheshire. Read MorePolice urge drivers to ensure cars are secure – after spate of attempted break-ins For the latest news and breaking news visit www.thesentinel.co.uk . Get all the big headlines, pictures, analysis, opinion and video on the stories that matter to you. Follow us on Twitter @ SentinelStaffs – the official Sentinel account – real news in real time. We’re also on www.facebook.com/sentinelstaffs – your must-see news, features, videos and pictures throughout Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire & South Cheshire.last_img read more