University initiative offers ePortfolio service

first_imgThe Notre Dame ePortfolio Engagement Program (nDEEP), launched its official online site April 9, offering new resources and assistance to students interested in forming virtual portfolios. Offering new ePortfolio resources and assistance, the Notre Dame ePortfolio Engagement Program (nDEEP) held a Career ePortfolio Student Workshop Wednesday. A new initiative by the Office of Provost, nDEEP serves students, faculty, advisors, programs and college departments. According to nDEEP’s webpage, the program’s mission provides resources that would help “build a deep and broad portfolio culture and community across the campus.” nDEEP’s Interim Commissioner Alex Ambrose said the program formed to meet the University’s need for a committee that would provide technical ePortfolio assistance for students and faculty of all programs and majors. “Because different faculty and departments have their own responsibilities, they are unable to invest enough time to expand on their use of ePortfolios,” Ambrose said. “Successful ePortfolio subscriptions have a support system that will help them with the skills and backing they need to implement ePortfolios into their programs or courses. That’s where nDEEP comes in. “We’re here to help them. Not only are we creating all these accounts for students and faculty, we’re having a program to help support it,” he said.   A Career ePortfolio Student Workshop held Wednesday addressed the relevance of ePortfolios for students in all undergraduate programs and colleges. They offered personal assistance for students interested in building or further developing their ePortfolios, Ambrose said. “The workshop [was] broken into three parts, “Ambrose said. “We [started] off explaining ePortfolio basics – what it is and why students should create it. We [also gave] students information on how their ePortfolio can work hand-in-hand with career services that will allow them to showcase their achievements and skills to prospective employers as students are looking for internships and jobs.” “Lastly, we [held] a hands-on workshop to show how students can create and customize their ePortfolios to make it stand out,” he said. As a more recent initiative by the University, ePortfolios were officially offered this year to all first year students, Ambrose said. With a majority of these students creating and modifying their ePortfolios, Ambrose said nDEEP hopes to see widespread use of ePortfolios among all undergraduates. “The Dean of First Years challenged the incoming freshman for this year to build their ePortfolios,” Ambrose said. “About 80 percent of the students took it on, and to us, that counts as a success because this is a tool that they can use later on in their careers. “As a researcher in the field of ePortfolios, ePortfolios should be for student engagement. It should engage and benefit the student first. If it helps improve the program or department, that is secondary.” Along with the First Year Studies, the College of Engineering use ePortfolios to help students further specify their engineering interests as well as showcase coursework and projects, freshman Rachel Wallace said. “In engineering, we have a specific ePortfolio that we use to put in our assignments and describe our experiences as we go out and explore the various fields within the engineering school at college events and major nights,” Wallace said. “These assignments force me to go out and get informed about what I want to study. Also, putting up engineering projects on this ePortfolio helps me show others what I’ve done so far in terms of engineering experience.”   Outside of academia, ePortfolios have become a medium for students to document their accomplishments during their undergraduate studies, freshman Ajani Crosley said. “It’s good because you can have everything out there at once so if people want to see what you’re like for a job interview, your ePortfolio does the talking for you,” Crosley said. “It tells employers and people who are interested in taking you into a position the things that you may not be able to fully say on the spot and gives them a fuller idea and details about who you are.” Contact Maria Do at mdo1@nd.edulast_img read more

GMP hosts local jobs fairs for Lowell wind project

first_imgGreen Mountain Power Corp,Green Mountain Power (GMP) hosted the first of two Jobs Fairs in the Northeast Kingdom Tuesday at the Lowell Fire Department in conjunction with the Kingdom Community Wind (KCW) project to be built on Lowell Mountain.  About 60 people from the area came to learn about job openings.  GMP’s General Contractor, Reed & Reed, along with three newly hired, Vermont-based contractors were on site to speak with attendees. Three Vermont-based contractors were recently selected to provide services for the construction phase of Kingdom Community Wind.  J.A. McDonald of Lyndon Center has been selected for the site preparation and road work and is seeking equipment operators and laborers. Bates & Murray Electrical Contractors of Barre will be doing the underground electrical work on the project and is taking applications as well.  Maine Drilling & Blasting, which has an office in Barre, has also been selected to work on the KCW project and is looking for driller trainees and laborers.     ‘As we get closer to construction, we are excited to begin talking with local residents about the job opportunities available as a result of the renewable wind project in Lowell,’ said Rebecca Towne, Administration Manager at Green Mountain Power.  ‘We are committed to employing as many Vermonters and Vermont companies as possible, including those who have already been hired.’ To date GMP has employed 18 other Vermont-based businesses during the permitting and planning phase of the project. ‘Supporting local jobs is one of the many benefits that Kingdom Community Wind brings to Orleans County and throughout northern Vermont. Local property taxes, the Good Neighbor Fund, Education tax payments, and renewable energy at a great price are others, ‘ added Towne.  Green Mountain Power and Reed & Reed will host a second Jobs Fair at North Country Union High School on Tuesday, July 19 from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. About Kingdom Community WindKingdom Community Wind is a local renewable wind energy project in Lowell, Vermont.  It will produce 63 MW of electricity for customers of Green Mountain Power and Vermont Electric Cooperative members.  The project received a certificate of public good from the Vermont Public Service Board in late May and construction is expected to commence in August of this year.  GMP expects KCW to be operational by the end of 2012.  About Green Mountain PowerGreen Mountain Power (www.greenmountainpower.com(link is external)) generates, transmits, distributes and sells electricity in the State of Vermont. It serves more than 175,000 people and businesses.last_img read more

Dirty Birds find another reason to publish stories about itself

first_imgMegan McCormick / The Badger HeraldWith apologies to Grantland Rice:Outlined against a blue-gray May sky, the Four Horsemen rode again. In dramatic lore they are known as Famine, Pestilence, Destruction and Death. These are only aliases. Their real names are Evans, Kleist, Brackeen and that kid who draws “Tanked Life” (Steven?). They formed the crest of the Daily Cardinal cyclone before which another fighting Badger Herald softball team was swept over the precipice at Vilas Park Friday afternoon, as a few dozen spectators peered down on the bewildering panorama spread on the muddy green plain below.A cyclone can’t be snared. It may be surrounded, but somewhere it breaks through to keep on going. When the cyclone starts from Vilas Hall, where the candle lights still gleam through the Wisconsin sugar maples, those in the way must take to storm cellars at top speed.Friday the cyclone struck again as The Daily Cardinal beat The Badger Herald, 7-6, with a set of star batsmen that ripped and crashed through a strong Herald defense with more speed and power than the warring journalists could meet.After winning last year’s game the cyclone was indeed snared early on, falling behind the Herald 4-0 after the first two innings. With that advantage, the Herald players could perhaps be forgiven the faintest hints of optimism.Maybe, they might have thought, this year would be different from the last. Maybe this team was good enough. Maybe their newspaper isn’t a visually boring bastion of the passive voice that people flip past on their way to read drivel like “SO to the coastie wearing Uggs!!!1 lolz.”But this year wouldn’t. That team wasn’t. And their newspaper is.The Cardinal cyclone soon restored order to the world, crushing that optimism in a valiant comeback and pulling past their Herald counterparts with great hitting, expert baserunning and a suffocating defense led by pitcher Matt Kleist. The Cardinal cruised to the win as Kleist pitched his way through a tense final inning that ended when Herald Sports Content Editor Kelly Erickson popped out with the tying run on third base.“It was a rocky start, but once the Herald actually started obeying its batting order and not putting the same five guys up to bat every inning, we turned it around,” Kleist said.Epic comebacks that will echo in the halls of glory for an eternity aside, Friday’s game was packed with intense action, controversial calls and the thrilling specter of a six-foot, seven-inch photo editor attempting to reverse direction in a muddy field to avoid getting doubled up on a fly out. It was truly a sight to behold.Umpire, journalism professor and cigar enthusiast James Baughman ruled over a heated but fair game between the rivals, often taking anticipation-packed extra seconds to call base runners out or safe to up the intensity whenever he could.“One of my good friends from Harvard used to always tell me, ‘Jim’ – and he’d always talk like that, and I would tell him, ‘What is wrong with your jaw?’ – anyway, he’d always tell me, ‘Jim, you simply have to make the most of the spotlight when it’s on you.’ And I’ve lived with that advice every day since,” Baughman said. “The only other place where I have so much attention on me is my cats at feeding time, but we all know how fickle Grady is.”After the game, Cardinalistas moved on to the flip cup table to dominate their foes in another arena, before shifting their focus back to kicking the Herald’s ass in the last weeks of the semester. The cyclone, as it always does, rages on.last_img read more