Film producer discusses mini-series

first_imgPart four of the five part documentary mini-series, titled “Women, War and Peace,” aired Tuesday on PBS. The series, which focuses on women’s roles in warfare, was produced in part by Nina Chaundry, who spoke on a panel Tuesday about the documentaries. “The creators of the series, Pamela Hogan, Abigail Disney and Gini Reticker, first met about the project in the fall of 2007,” Chaundry said. “They had each individually noticed a similar trend in reporting: a focus on the men and the guns and a dearth of stories about the women and families who are disproportionately targeted in today’s conflict zones — but seldom covered in news reports.” Chaundry said the idea for the film series was born after this conversation. “Disproportionate attention has been paid to men in conflict, and we hope that this series is the beginning of a dialogue and that more films and more reporting will look at conflict through women’s eyes,” she said. When choosing the stories to tell in the documentary, she said the producers and filmmakers wanted to give underreported stories the attention they deserve. “Deciding which conflicts to cover was one of the most difficult decisions we had to make,” she said. “We researched stories around the world, including Asia, Central America, Chechnya, Georgia, Israel and Palestine, Northern Ireland, Congo, Sudan, Guinea as well as the stories in Bosnia, Colombia and Afghanistan.” After all their research was collected, the filmmakers decided to tell the story of how war had changed in the last 20 years since the end of the Cold War, Chaundry said. “Since the end of the Cold War, it has become more dangerous to be a woman in a conflict zone than a soldier,” she said. The filmmakers wanted to make sure to demonstrate this was a global occurrence, Chaundry said. They did this by committing to covering as many regions of the world as they could. The films focused on four countries, with a final piece tying all the themes together and discussing how war has changed in a post-Cold War world. “I Came to Testify,” the first episode of the mini-series, told the story of how 16 Bosnian women testified against their rapists in international court. “We decided on Bosnia, because it was the first time that women were successful in getting rape prosecuted as a war crime, setting a major precedent in international law which is now being used globally,” Chaundry said. She said the process of finding and interviewing the women for “I Came to Testify” was a very delicate process. “Filmmaker Pamela Hogan and her associate producer Jessie Beauchaine initially reached out to the investigators and prosecutors that the women had trusted from The Hague,” Chaundry said. “When Hogan and Beauchaine first met the women, they then had to gain their trust, which was no easy task.” The women did not particularly want to talk to journalists and even suffered from headaches and other physical ills because telling their story is so traumatizing, Chaundry said. Chaundry said building relationships with these women was difficult, but a journalist’s emotions can help build trust and rapport. “As journalists we are charged with being objective storytellers, but it’s impossible to check your emotions, especially when you are covering such intimate stories,” she said. “In fact, I find it’s important to allow yourself to have the emotions. It’s essential for building trust and rapport with the people you are filming.” The second week’s episode, “Pray the Devil Back to Hell,” was a film already made by Abigail Disney. “We already knew that the series would include ‘Pray the Devil Back to Hell,’ the story of the women who came together and brought an end to the civil war in Liberia,” Chaundry said. Week three’s episode, “Peace Unveiled,” focused on Afghanistan, where the filmmakers tell the story of female activists. “We felt obligated as Americans to tell the story of women in a conflict in which we were directly involved,” she said. Filming in Afghanistan posed some very real security problems, especially in the Kandahar region when interviewing women’s rights activist Shahida Hussein, Chaundry said. “We exercised extreme caution in that case and respected the wishes of the activist Shahida Hussein,” she said. “At one point in the filming, she asked that she be filmed by an Afghan male who could then appear to others as a male relative and would then not draw too much attention to her or her family. At another time, she wanted a woman to film with her and we even experimented filming from behind the burqa!” While there were specific threats against the activists in Afghanistan, safety was a concern almost everywhere the mini-series was filmed, Chaundry said. “Threats were already a part of the daily lives of several of the women we feature in the series and I’m not sure if the threats intensified as a result of our filming, but we were aware throughout production — and even now — that it was a possibility,” she said. “The courage these women have shown in their lives and in sharing their stories with us is a responsibility that the entire team feels and one that we take very seriously.” The fourth episode in the series, “The War We are Living,” focuses on a conflict in Colombia, which has displaced more people than any other place in the world, other than the Sudan, Chaundry said. “In Colombia, as in the rest of the world, the majority of the internally displaced people are women and their dependents,” she said. Throughout the filming process, the filmmakers wanted to make sure the women were not just portrayed as victims, Chaundry said. In many cases women are usually seen as such, and their work towards peace is undermined. “All of these women are taking personal risks, risks that jeopardize not only themselves but also their children and extended families,” she said.last_img read more

Sumner County Court Docket: August 31 report

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The following are a list of criminal court complaints recently filed by the Sumner County Attorney’s office.These are formal charges introduced into the Sumner County District Court system. The suspects listed in the complaint have not been tried by a judge or jury unless specified otherwise. All citizens are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.•••••State of Kansas v. Jessie DeWayne French— Case No: 16 CR 2o5.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Wellington.Date of alleged crime: July 15, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Violating of protective order, Class A misdemeanor. Count 2 — Criminal trespass, Class B misdemeanor. Case description: French is accused of violating a protective from stalking order against a defendant. —————State of Kansas v. Colton Wilson — Case No: 16 CR 2o6.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Wichita.Date of alleged crime: July 7, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Possession of marijuana, Class A misdemeanor. Count 2 — Possession of drug paraphernalia, Class A misdemeanor. Count 3 — Speeding, traffic infraction. Case description: Wilson is accused of possessing a bag full of marijuana, a green bottle with marijuana inside and two small baggies with crumbs of marijuana. He also allegedly had in his a multicolored smoking pipe and an empty package of Swisher Sweet cigars after being  stopped for operating a motor vehicle on 100 West 15th Street in Sumner County after driving at a speed of 44 mph in a 30 mph zone.Court ruling: Wilson pled guilty of the Count 2 of possession of drug paraphernalia, while the possession of marijuana and speeding misdemeanors were dismissed. He was sentenced to six months county jail, fined $250 and court costs and was granted one year probation with special conditions. This means he will not serve jail time unless he violates the stipulations of his probation.—————State of Kansas v. Robert Kimzey — Case No: 16 CR 2o7.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Wichita.Date of alleged crime: July 17, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Possession of methamphetamine, level 5 drug felony. Count 2 — Possession of drug paraphernalia, Class A misdemeanor. Count 3 — Interference with law enforcement, level 8 or 9 felony. Case description: Kimzey is accused of having a plastic baggie with methamphetamine inside. He also allegedly ran away from a police officer and hid behind a tree and discarded the baggie, who was trying to make contact with him.—————State of Kansas v. Paul Michael — Case No: 16 CR 2o8.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Haysville. Date of alleged crime: July 14, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Theft/possession of stolen property, level 9 felony. Count 2 — Criminal deprivation of motor vehicle, Class A misdemeanor. Count 3 — Illegal registration, Class B misdemeanor. Case description: Michael is accused of stealing a 2012 black Mazda valued at more than $1,000.  He allegedly was driving on U.S. 81 near the Kansas Star Casino with a tag displayed that was assigned to a different vehicle.—————State of Kansas v. Alex Dee Davis — Case No: 16 CR 2o9.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Wichita. Date of alleged crime: July 14, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Theft/possession of stolen property, level 9 felony. Count 2 — Theft/possession of stolen property, Class A misdemeanor. Count 3 — Driving while canceled, suspended or revoked. Case description: Davis is accused of stealing a silver 2010 Chevrolet Malibu valued less than $1,000. When apprehended Davis allegedly had a LG Plasma TV and Abercrombie and Fitch tote bag.Court ruling: Davis has pled guilty to Count 2 of theft/possession of stolen property and Count 3 of driving with suspended sentence. Davis was sentenced to one year in county jail with one year probation and $100 in costs. —————State of Kansas v. Matthew Wegner — Case No: 16 CR 21o.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Rose Hill. Date of alleged crime: July 16, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Possession of methamphetamine, level 5 drug felony. Count 2 — Possession of drug paraphernalia, Class A misdemeanor. Count 3 — Driving while canceled, suspended or revoked. Case description: Megner is accused of having meth inside a small clear cellophane bag.—————State of Kansas v. Robert Mack Carter — Case No: 16 CR 211.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Conway Springs. Date of alleged crime: July 18, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Stalking, level 9 felony. Count 2 — Violation of protective order, Class A misdemeanor. Count 3 — Criminal trespass, Class B misdemeanor. Case description: Carter is accused of  driving multiple times a day in front of an individual’s residence and his work when he was ordered not to have contact with said individual that was issued in a “final protection from stalking” report issued on June 20, 2016. —————State of Kansas v. Kelly Dawn Brister — Case No: 16 CR 213.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Wellington. Date of alleged crime: May 25, 2016Charges:Count 1 — Possession of Oxycodone (Oxycontin), level 5 drug felony. Case description: Brister is accused of possession an opiate drug, Oxycontin, that was purchased through two pills for $20. —————State of Kansas v. Anthony Banks — Case No: 16 CR 214.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Wellington. Date of alleged crime: July 20, 2016Charges:Count 1 — Possession methamphetamine, level 5 drug felony. Count 2 — Possession drug paraphernalia, Class A misdemeanor. Case description: Banks is accused of having a small amount of meth in a bag in his pocket when he was arrested on a separate warrant. —————State of Kansas v. William Kyle Bemis — Case No: 16 CR 215.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Wichita. Date of alleged crime: July 16, 2016Charges:Count 1 — Driving under the influence – child enhanced, first offense, Class B misdemeanor. Count 2 — Obstruction of official duty, level 9 felony. Count 3 — Speeding, traffic infraction. Count 4 — Refusal of PBT, traffic infraction. Count 5 — Disorderly conduct, Class C misdemeanor. Case description: Bemis is accused of driving under the influence with one or more children under the age of 14 in the vehicle when apprehended at 1000 N. Logan Street in Belle Plaine after going 41 in a 30 mph zone. He also allegedly used abusive language at the police officer in front of his children. —————State of Kansas v. Justin Michael Brown — Case No: 16 CR 216.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Oxford. Date of alleged crime: July 16, 2016Charges:Count 1 — Domestic Battery, Class B misdemeanor. Count 2 — Disorderly conduct, Class C misdemeanor. Count 3 — Disorderly conduct, Class C misdemeanor. Case description: Brown is accused of hitting Donnell Horner in the head and upper body, who suffered a scratch on the left side of her face and a scratch from the corner of her left eye while parked at Casey’s General Store in Oxford. —————State of Kansas v. Donell Horner — Case No: 16 CR 218.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Oxford. Date of alleged crime: July 16, 2016Charges:Count 1 — Domestic Battery, Class B misdemeanor. Count 2 — Disorderly conduct, Class C misdemeanor. Count 3 — Disorderly conduct, Class C misdemeanor. Case description: Horner is accused of hitting Justin Brown in the head and upper body, who suffered scratch on his arms and a split lip while parked at Casey’s General Store in Oxford. —————State of Kansas v. Paul Eugene Osborne, Jr. — Case No: 16 CR 219.Date of birth: 1981. Address: Wellington. Date of alleged crime: May 1, 2016Charges:Count 1 — Failure to report during month of April as required by Kansas Offender Registration Act, level 6 felony. Count 2 — Failure to report change of address to Sheriff within three days after qualifying as drug offender, level 6 felony. Case description: Osborne, convicted as a drug offender, was accused of not reporting to the sheriff  of his last place of residence for the past 34 months, as required in the Kansas Offender Registration Act. —————State of Kansas v. Dale Church — Case No: 16 CR 220.Date of birth: 1938. Address: Wellington. Date of alleged crime: July 22, 2016Charges:Count 1 — Domestic battery, Class A misdemeanor (second offense Sumner County 15 CR 114). Count 2 — Domestic battery, Class A misdemeanor (second offense). Count 3 — Criminal damage to property, Class B misdemeanor. Count 4 — Aggravated intimidation of a witness, Level 6 felony. Case description: Church is accused of striking a family member with his  fist on her right arm causing visible bruising on about July 21, 2016. Then on July 22, 2016, he angrily slapped the same woman in the face multiple times while she was on her bed at 913 E. 12th in Wellington. Then allegedly, he broke her eyeglasses while slapping her. He also is accused of threatening to kill her if she went to the police to report him slapping her. —————State of Kansas v. Steven Shugart, Jr. — Case No: 16 CR 222.Date of birth: 1988. Address: Wichita.Date of alleged crime: July 23, 2016Charges:Count 1 — Driving as a habitual violator, Class A misdemeanor. Count 2 — Possession marijuana, Class B misdemeanor. Count 3 — Possession marijuana, Class B misdemeanor. Case description: Shugart is accused of driving a black 2008 Acura with a revoked license. He also allegedly possessed six individually wrapped bags of marijuana in the center console of his vehicle and another bag in the glove box of the vehicle. He also had six plastic bags containing marijuana. —————State of Kansas v. Joshua Asbury — Case No: 16 CR 223.Date of birth: 1988. Address: Homeless. Date of alleged crime: July 12, 2016Charges:Count 1 — Interference with law enforcement, Class A misdemeanor. Case description: Asbury is accused of falsely reporting to a police officer that his name is Chris Asbury, knowing his name was Joshua Asbury. —————State of Kansas v. Cecil Chisholm III — Case No: 16 CR 224.Date of birth: N/A. Address: Arkansas City. Date of alleged crime: April 3, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Battery, Class B misdemeanor. Count 2 — Assault, Class C misdemeanor. Case description: Chisholm is accused of shooting another person with a paintball gun in the left forearm, leaving redness and a welt as he was leaving his cousin’s house on his riding lawn mower.—————State of Kansas v. Robert Baker — Case No: 16 CR 227Date of birth: 1977. Address: Arkansas City. Date of alleged crime: July 26, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Possession drug paraphernalia, Class A misdemeanor. Case description: Baker is accused of possessing a glass marijuana pipe and a green rubber container storing marijuana residue which was inside his backpack in the vehicle he was occupying. —————State of Kansas v. Debra Sue Kessler — Case No: 16 CR 228Date of birth: N/A. Address: Belle Plaine. Date of alleged crime: July 16, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Domestic battery, Class B misdemeanor. Case description: Kessler is accused of physically striking a household member.—————State of Kansas v. Donald Dewane Storey — Case No: 16 CR 229Date of birth: N/A. Address: Belle Plaine. Date of alleged crime: July 16, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Domestic battery, Class B misdemeanor. Case description: Kessler is accused of physically striking a household member.—————State of Kansas v. Kelly Williams — Case No: 16 CR 230Date of birth: 1977. Address: Wichita Date of alleged crime: July 29, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Theft, level 7 felony. Count 2 — Driving as habitual violator, Class A misdemeanor. Count 3 — No proof of insurance, Class A misdemeanor. Count 4 — Interference with law enforcement, level 9 felony. Case description: Williams is accused of driving a stolen 2016 Dodge Charger belonging to Hertz Rental Co. on the Kansas Turnpike with intent of keeping it at mile post 21 in Sumner County. He then allegedly had a suspended driver’s license, no insurance, and was providing law enforcement false information.—————State of Kansas v. Bradlee James Ingram — Case No: 16 CR 231Date of birth: 1985. Address: Belle Plaine.Date of alleged crime: July 8, 2016.Charges:Count 1 — Criminal trespass, Class B misdemeanor. Count 2 — Violation protective order, Class A misdemeanor. Case description: Ingram is accused of entering a property at 310 S. Washington in Belle Plaine, knowing he was not authorized to do so after receiving a Domestic Battery and Criminal Restraint order against a woman who was staying there. Allegedly, Ingram had a fight with the property owner’s daughter on April 27, 2016 and was not welcomed at her mother’s house where the daughter was staying. The mother allegedly, shut the door on him. —————last_img read more