Dodgeball tournament benefits ‘Pink Zone’

first_imgAfter learning about Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease at a lecture this fall, sophomore Ashley Barraza contacted Dean of Science Gregory Crawford, who biked cross-country with his wife the two previous summers to raise awareness for the disease, with an interest in giving back. During the brainstorming process, an event to benefit NPC morphed into a benefit for breast cancer and the inaugural “Dodge Stress, Fight Cancer” dodgeball tournament was born. The event took place Wednesday night at the Rolf’s Sports Recreation Center.  “Increasing breast cancer awareness and discovering ways to fight this disease is a really important cause, especially at Notre Dame,” Barraza said. “Dean Crawford really supports this initiative, so we wanted to raise awareness and help monetarily in a small way.”  Barraza and Crawford ultimately decided to support Pink Zone, a national initiative dedicated to raising funds for breast cancer awareness in women’s basketball, on campuses and in communities, according to the Notre Dame athletics website.  Barraza credited Crawford with conceiving the idea for a dodgeball tournament.  “Playing dodgeball was Dean Crawford’s idea. After seeing some students playing at Rolfs one day, he said it looked like a lot of fun,” Barraza said. “We both thought joining dodgeball with fundraising was unique and an effective way to target a wide range of students.”  Undergraduates, graduate students, MBA students, representatives from Notre Dame athletics and professors participated in the event.  “Dr. Hyde and the Knockout Genes,” a genetics study group, included a professor, a teaching assistant and undergraduate students. Sophomore Kevin Matuszewski, a member of Dr. Hyde’s team, viewed the tournament as a way to bond with his fellow group members. “We have gotten to know each other pretty well throughout the year, so this was a good way to have fun with our professor and with each other,” Matuszewski said. Matuszewski also commented on Crawford’s eager participation. “You see a darker side of Dean Crawford,” Matuszewski said. “He brought his whatever it takes attitude into a new arena.”  Zahm Hall’s team was excited to continue their dodgeball dominance while also getting the opportunity to contribute to a great cause. “Originally, we signed up because we won the interhall dodgeball championship, but the deciding factor was the cause,” junior Casey Lilek said. “Supporting others is what Zahm is all about.” While Zahm eventually lost to “Where My Money At,” a team of MBA students, Barraza said they played hard the entire tournament. Based on preliminary numbers, Barraza believes the tournament raised around $1,000, which was much higher than she expected. “I am really happy with the outcome,” Barraza said. “Everyone was really enthusiastic and competitive, and I think all the participants had a lot of fun.”last_img read more

Wellington Police Notes: Tuesday, July 5, 2016

first_imgWellington Police notes: Tuesday, July 5, 2016:•12:03 a.m. Don J. Sharpsteen, 58, Dodge City, was arrested, charged and confined with possession of stimulants.•2:03 a.m. Brenton R. Falls, 34, Wellington was arrested, charged and confined with possession of depressants and possession of drug paraphernalia.•7:20 a.m. Non-Injury accident in the 400 block S. C, Wellington involving vehicles operated by Christopher C. Rain, 29, Wellington and Kathleen G. Long, 78, Wellington.•11:46 a.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 1300 block E. Harvey, Wellington which occurred on July 4, 2016.•12:25 p.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 1000 block S. Jefferson, Wellington.•12:42 p.m. Officers investigated a theft of wallet and contents in the 1400 block E. Michigan, Wellington.•9:12 p.m. Officers investigated a battery and assault in the 1300 block N. A, Wellington by known suspect.•10:30 p.m. Officers investigated a battery and assault in the 1300 block N. A, Wellington by known suspect.last_img read more

Michael Thomas, Alvin Kamara and other Saints forgive Drew Brees: ‘Let’s focus back on the real issue’

first_imgDrew Brees may have talked himself into a bad spot, but it seems like at least a few of his teammates are willing to forgive him.In an interview with Yahoo Finance, the Saints quarterback reiterated his stance against kneeling during the national anthem, saying he’ll “never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United States of America.” Meanwhile, Brees completely ignored the issue — police brutality and racial injustice against black people — of which those protests, as well as the ongoing protests in the country, have been trying to address. I would like to apologize to my friends, teammates, the City of New Orleans, the black community, NFL community and anyone I hurt with my comments yesterday. In speaking with some of you, it breaks my heart to know the pain I have caused. In an attempt to talk about respect, unity, and solidarity centered around the American flag and the national anthem, I made comments that were insensitive and completely missed the mark on the issues we are facing right now as a country. They lacked awareness and any type of compassion or empathy. Instead, those words have become divisive and hurtful and have misled people into believing that somehow I am an enemy. This could not be further from the truth, and is not an accurate reflection of my heart or my character. This is where I stand: I stand with the black community in the fight against systemic racial injustice and police brutality and support the creation of real policy change that will make a difference. I condemn the years of oppression that have taken place throughout our black communities and still exists today. I acknowledge that we as Americans, including myself, have not done enough to fight for that equality or to truly understand the struggles and plight of the black community. I recognize that I am part of the solution and can be a leader for the black community in this movement. I will never know what it’s like to be a black man or raise black children in America but I will work every day to put myself in those shoes and fight for what is right. I have ALWAYS been an ally, never an enemy. I am sick about the way my comments were perceived yesterday, but I take full responsibility and accountability. I recognize that I should do less talking and more listening…and when the black community is talking about their pain, we all need to listen. For that, I am very sorry and I ask your forgiveness.A post shared by Drew Brees (@drewbrees) on Jun 4, 2020 at 5:22am PDT”(My comments) lacked awareness and any type of compassion or empathy. Instead, those words have become divisive and hurtful and have misled people into believing that somehow I am an enemy. This could not be further from the truth, and is not an accurate reflection of my heart or my character.”A handful of Saints players accepted Brees’ apology, which did include a denouncement of racial injustice and police brutality.His backfield partner, Alvin Kamara, tweeted that he was “disappointed and hurt” by Brees’ comments, but he reached out to Brees and the two came to an understanding.I’ve had a day to digest the comments that Drew made. I was disappointed and hurt. We talked and i explained to him where he dropped the ball and he understood. But now it’s time for us to be part of the solution, not the problem. We have to educate to progress.— Alvin Kamara (@A_kamara6) June 4, 2020New Orleans linebacker Demario Davis went on CNN to commend Brees for his apology. View this post on Instagram New Orleans safety Malcom Jenkins was particularly frustrated with Brees’ later self-admitted lack of awareness, saying that he once had respect for Brees, “But sometimes (he) should shut the f— up.””Our communities are under siege and we need help,” Jenkins said. “And what you’re telling us is don’t ask for help that way, ask for it a different way. I can’t listen to it when you ask that way. We’re done asking, Drew. And people who share your sentiments, who express those, and push them throughout the world, the airwaves, are the problem.”MORE: ‘F— Drew Brees’: New Orleans marchers respond to Saints QBAfter the backlash, Brees issued an apology on Instagram on Thursday morning, saying he “completely missed the mark on the issues we are facing right now as a country.” JUST NOW: “For him to admit that he was wrong.. I think that is leadership at its finest.”New Orleans @Saints linebacker @demario__davis reacts to hearing @dreabrees’ apology in real time. pic.twitter.com/ynY2Ssy6je— Alli Hedges Maser (@AllisonLHedges) June 4, 2020″For him to admit that he was wrong.. I think that is leadership at its finest.”Saints wide receiver Michael Thomas tweeted in support of Brees, saying “he apologized (and) I accept it because that’s what we are taught as Christians.” He then sent out a series of tweets reminding people that the issue —the reason all of these protests are going on nationwide — is to bring an end to police brutality and racial injustice.One of my brothers made a public statement yesterday that I disagreed with. He apologized & I accept it because that’s what we are taught to do as Christians. Now back to the movement! #GeorgeFloyd— Michael Thomas (@Cantguardmike) June 4, 2020Let’s focus back on the real issue going on in the world. And not get distracted.— Michael Thomas (@Cantguardmike) June 4, 2020″Let’s focus back on the real issue going on in the world,” Thomas wrote. “And not get distracted.”last_img read more