Dodgeball tournament benefits ‘Pink Zone’

first_imgAfter learning about Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease at a lecture this fall, sophomore Ashley Barraza contacted Dean of Science Gregory Crawford, who biked cross-country with his wife the two previous summers to raise awareness for the disease, with an interest in giving back. During the brainstorming process, an event to benefit NPC morphed into a benefit for breast cancer and the inaugural “Dodge Stress, Fight Cancer” dodgeball tournament was born. The event took place Wednesday night at the Rolf’s Sports Recreation Center.  “Increasing breast cancer awareness and discovering ways to fight this disease is a really important cause, especially at Notre Dame,” Barraza said. “Dean Crawford really supports this initiative, so we wanted to raise awareness and help monetarily in a small way.”  Barraza and Crawford ultimately decided to support Pink Zone, a national initiative dedicated to raising funds for breast cancer awareness in women’s basketball, on campuses and in communities, according to the Notre Dame athletics website.  Barraza credited Crawford with conceiving the idea for a dodgeball tournament.  “Playing dodgeball was Dean Crawford’s idea. After seeing some students playing at Rolfs one day, he said it looked like a lot of fun,” Barraza said. “We both thought joining dodgeball with fundraising was unique and an effective way to target a wide range of students.”  Undergraduates, graduate students, MBA students, representatives from Notre Dame athletics and professors participated in the event.  “Dr. Hyde and the Knockout Genes,” a genetics study group, included a professor, a teaching assistant and undergraduate students. Sophomore Kevin Matuszewski, a member of Dr. Hyde’s team, viewed the tournament as a way to bond with his fellow group members. “We have gotten to know each other pretty well throughout the year, so this was a good way to have fun with our professor and with each other,” Matuszewski said. Matuszewski also commented on Crawford’s eager participation. “You see a darker side of Dean Crawford,” Matuszewski said. “He brought his whatever it takes attitude into a new arena.”  Zahm Hall’s team was excited to continue their dodgeball dominance while also getting the opportunity to contribute to a great cause. “Originally, we signed up because we won the interhall dodgeball championship, but the deciding factor was the cause,” junior Casey Lilek said. “Supporting others is what Zahm is all about.” While Zahm eventually lost to “Where My Money At,” a team of MBA students, Barraza said they played hard the entire tournament. Based on preliminary numbers, Barraza believes the tournament raised around $1,000, which was much higher than she expected. “I am really happy with the outcome,” Barraza said. “Everyone was really enthusiastic and competitive, and I think all the participants had a lot of fun.”last_img read more

Experts explore implications of Southeast Arizona Land Exchange

first_imgWendsler Nosie, former Chairman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe of Arizona, and David Smith, a lawyer who specializes in Native American litigation, spoke to law students Tuesday night about the protection of Native American sacred sites. The two experts focused on the Southeast Arizona Land Exchange and Conservation Act, which traded 2,400 acres, much of it tribal land, to the Australian-British mining company Resolution Copper, a subsidiary of Rio Tinto, the largest mining company in the world. Nosie is the leader of the Occupy Oak Flat, a movement which is in opposition to the Southeast Arizona Land Exchange, and he intends to protest until the Act is repealed.Smith said Nosie is a leader not only for the Apache but also for other native tribes.“[Nosie] is taking the issue of sovereignty and the importance of protecting culture and religion, and he has shown how it should be and how it should be preserved,” Smith said.Resolution Copper plans to use a mining method called “block caving,” which involves blasting the ore body deep underground before removing the copper. Environmentalists around the world oppose the method for its ecological risks.To start the lecture, Smith provided a review of the legal history of the protection of exercise of religions and focused on its application to Native American religions.The bill was proposed 13 times and denied, Smith said. He said it was only passed when it was included as a midnight rider onto the 2015 United States National Defense Authorization Act.“So within this 550-page piece of legislature regarding defense spending, there’s this 10-page bill turning the Apache sacred site over to the Rio Tinto mining company,” he said.Nosie said he was concerned people were not fully aware of the consequences that this mining project would have on the spiritual life of Apaches and provided a brief history of the oppression of Native Americans. He said without the knowledge of the foundations of Native American history and culture, it is difficult for Americans to have informed opinions about issues such as the Southeast Arizona Land Exchange.“The sad thing that I come across in fighting is that it seems like America knows nothing about all these issues,” he said. “It’s really alarming because it goes back to what we say about the possibilities that may occur down the road if America doesn’t wake up.”The bill did not initially have any support outside of Arizona congressmen, due to the fact that the congressmen from other states recognized the lack of transparency within the bill, Nosie said.“Nobody, other than our own congressional state leaders, supported [the bill],” he said. “And so, in 13 attempts in Washington it never passed because the other congressmen from the other states felt the same: that there was no transparency and that this wasn’t a good bill, not only for the religion part, but economically, environmentally, nationally and internationally.”More information can be found at apache-stronghold.com Tags: Apache, David Smith, Occupy Oak Flat, Resolution Copper, Rio Tinto mining company, Southeast Land Exchange, Wendsler Nosielast_img read more

Credit union lending: NCUA says delinquencies are rising

first_imgA new report from the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) finds that loan delinquencies and charge-off rates are rising at the nation’s CUs.Much of this is due to a happy development: credit union lending has risen by a healthy amount recently.In fact, loans outstanding were up 10.7% in the year ending in the first quarter of 2016. Total loans reached $799.5 billion at the end of the first quarter, NCUA said.New auto loan originations rose 15.4%, accounting for the biggest part of the overall increase. Used auto loans were up by 13.2%.CUs are lending more to member businesses. These loans grew by 13%. continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Enemies at the gate

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