Dodgeball tournament benefits ‘Pink Zone’

first_imgAfter learning about Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease at a lecture this fall, sophomore Ashley Barraza contacted Dean of Science Gregory Crawford, who biked cross-country with his wife the two previous summers to raise awareness for the disease, with an interest in giving back. During the brainstorming process, an event to benefit NPC morphed into a benefit for breast cancer and the inaugural “Dodge Stress, Fight Cancer” dodgeball tournament was born. The event took place Wednesday night at the Rolf’s Sports Recreation Center.  “Increasing breast cancer awareness and discovering ways to fight this disease is a really important cause, especially at Notre Dame,” Barraza said. “Dean Crawford really supports this initiative, so we wanted to raise awareness and help monetarily in a small way.”  Barraza and Crawford ultimately decided to support Pink Zone, a national initiative dedicated to raising funds for breast cancer awareness in women’s basketball, on campuses and in communities, according to the Notre Dame athletics website.  Barraza credited Crawford with conceiving the idea for a dodgeball tournament.  “Playing dodgeball was Dean Crawford’s idea. After seeing some students playing at Rolfs one day, he said it looked like a lot of fun,” Barraza said. “We both thought joining dodgeball with fundraising was unique and an effective way to target a wide range of students.”  Undergraduates, graduate students, MBA students, representatives from Notre Dame athletics and professors participated in the event.  “Dr. Hyde and the Knockout Genes,” a genetics study group, included a professor, a teaching assistant and undergraduate students. Sophomore Kevin Matuszewski, a member of Dr. Hyde’s team, viewed the tournament as a way to bond with his fellow group members. “We have gotten to know each other pretty well throughout the year, so this was a good way to have fun with our professor and with each other,” Matuszewski said. Matuszewski also commented on Crawford’s eager participation. “You see a darker side of Dean Crawford,” Matuszewski said. “He brought his whatever it takes attitude into a new arena.”  Zahm Hall’s team was excited to continue their dodgeball dominance while also getting the opportunity to contribute to a great cause. “Originally, we signed up because we won the interhall dodgeball championship, but the deciding factor was the cause,” junior Casey Lilek said. “Supporting others is what Zahm is all about.” While Zahm eventually lost to “Where My Money At,” a team of MBA students, Barraza said they played hard the entire tournament. Based on preliminary numbers, Barraza believes the tournament raised around $1,000, which was much higher than she expected. “I am really happy with the outcome,” Barraza said. “Everyone was really enthusiastic and competitive, and I think all the participants had a lot of fun.”last_img read more

Clear language and respect

first_imgby: Seth GodinOur connection economy thrives when people understand what to expect from one another. We’re more likely than ever to engage in interactions that involve an exchange, something that deserves a specific clarification. I’ll do this and you’ll do that.More and more agreements are being made, because more and more transactions happen outside or between organizations. The question then: What does good drafting look like?If the agreement starts with “whereas” and continues along with, “notwithstanding the foregoing,” and when it must be decoded by a lawyer on the other side, something has gone wrong. These code words, and the dense language that frequently appears in legal agreements, are symptoms of a system out of whack. It’s possible to be precise without being obtuse.There’s actually no legal requirement that an agreement not be in specific, clear, everyday English. To do otherwise disrespects the person you’re hoping to engage with. There’s no legal requirement that even the terms of service for a website can’t be clear and easy to understand. In fact, if the goal is to avoid confusion and the costs of the legal system when conflicts occur, the more clear, the better.Consider this clause, which can change everything: “Any disagreements over the interpretation of this agreement will be resolved through binding, informal arbitration. Both of us agree to hire a non-involved attorney, submit up to five pages of material to state our case, and abide by her decision.” continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

US Justice Department says Yale illegally discriminates against Asians, whites

first_imgThe elite school “uses race at multiple steps of its admissions process resulting in a multiplied effect of race on an applicant’s likelihood of admission,” the Justice Department said.The Justice Department has previously filed legal briefs in support of a lawsuit, brought by affirmative action opponents, accusing Harvard University of discriminating against Asian Americans.A federal judge in Boston ruled in favor of Harvard last year, saying the school’s affirmative action program advanced a legitimate interest in having a diverse student body.An appeal of that ruling is pending. The case could eventually reach the Supreme Court.Affirmative action programs in higher education were meant to address racial discrimination. The Supreme Court has ruled universities may use affirmative action with the aim of helping minority applicants get into college.US conservatives have said that in helping Black and Latino applicants, affirmative action can hurt white people and Asian Americans.  A Yale spokeswoman said the university “categorically denies” the allegations but has cooperated fully with the investigation.The Justice Department made its findings before allowing Yale to provide requested documents, Yale said.”Had the Department fully received and fairly weighed this information, it would have concluded that Yale’s practices absolutely comply with decades of Supreme Court precedent,” the spokeswoman said.The Justice Department said that although race can lawfully be considered in college admissions in limited circumstances, “Yale’s use of race is anything but limited.” The US Justice Department on Thursday accused Yale University of illegally discriminating against Asian American and white applicants in its undergraduate admissions process in violation of US civil rights law.The findings are the result of a two-year investigation in response to a complaint by Asian-American groups concerning Yale’s conduct, the department said in a statement.The department said it was prepared to file a lawsuit against Yale if the school, in New Haven, Connecticut, did not take “remedial measures.”center_img Topics :last_img read more