Disease-resistant chickens

first_imgA team of researchers from the University of Georgia and the U.S. Department of Agriculture is working to develop a new technology to breed chickens resistant to Newcastle Virus. “Disease and death in livestock is a serious problem, particularly in underdeveloped countries,” said Georgia Research Alliance eminent scholar Steve Stice, an animal and dairy professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. In sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia, there are more than 17 billion chickens, and 90 percent of smallholder farmers raise chickens. Poultry is an important source of income and protein for many of these farmers and their families. Newcastle Virus kills about one-quarter of the chickens in sub-Saharan Africa every year, and mortality within a flock can reach 100 percent. “In those areas, veterinary care is minimal and livestock plays a large role not only as a key source of food, but also is a large share of their savings, income, credit, insurance, loans, gifts and investments,” Stice said. “That makes disease and death in livestock a critical problem.” “In the last 30 years, access to animal health services, vaccines and medicines has decreased significantly in Africa,” said Franklin West, a CAES animal and dairy science assistant professor and co-investigator leading the project with Stice. “As a result, at least 25 percent of the livestock in many African countries die every year compared to less than 5 percent in developed countries.” Losing even a few animals on a small family farm, the most common type of farm in developing countries, can have long-lasting repercussions on family stability, health and the ability to provide for children.Seeking solutions The University of Georgia Research Foundation received nearly $1.6 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to support the researchers to search for ways to make poultry naturally resistant to Newcastle disease.The team will investigate applying a process called cellular adaptive resistance, which uses stem cells to create disease resistance in animals. The approach is a direct offshoot of previous work by Stice and West that produced pigs from stem cells using a similar process. “We want to provide a new way to create disease-resistant animals using new technologies to combat disease problems,” Stice said. “This process will produce animals with natural resistance to specific diseases that will need less veterinary care and will significantly reduce livestock mortalities.”Stice and West are conducting this research along with UGA poultry scientist Robert Beckstead and Claudio Alfonso, a researcher at the USDA Poultry Research Laboratory in Athens, Ga.last_img read more

Clips of the Week

first_imgGo ahead. Try and hold back the tears.  This new video series from Yeti chronicles the iconic lives of Grand Canyon river runners. This week’s compilation spans the gamut. From a heartfelt video about a man and his dying dog to a new series from Yeti about the lives of Grand Canyon river runners, this installment of ‘Clips of the Week’ will have you stoked for the weekend while crying your eyes out. Sit back and enjoy the emotional roller coaster.Ever since he quit his New York-based design job and took to the highways and byways in his 1987 Volkswagen Vanagon, Foster Huntington has been one of the foremost advocates of the #vanlife lifestyle. Now he’s finally settling down in an epic tree house he built himself in the Columbia River Gorge. center_img Join Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and Tenkara USA for two days of canyoneering and unconventional fly fishing in the lush forests of Southern Appalachia. last_img read more

First Descent Paddler: Chasing Waterfalls

first_imgMichael John Ferraro bags a first descent of Bearwallow Falls and becomes the fifth paddler to plunge down Looking Glass Falls.If you dig WHITEWATER, you best remember the name Michael John Ferraro. 2019 is shaping up to be a big year for this 22-year-old North Carolina boater. He’s making a name for himself as a bold explorer, paddling where few others have dared to go. In January Ferraro bagged the first ever descent of 50-foot Lower Bearwallow Falls and just a few days thereafter became only the fifth kayaker in history to launch off Looking Glass Falls in the Pisgah Ranger District. Ferraro’s list of monster drops would be even more impressive if he could talk about them all, but as a part-time carpenter and full-time dirtbag, he’d rather avoid federal fines.On the competitive side of the sport, Ferraro is equally ambitious. He took sixth in this year’s Green Race. With a new sponsor in Liquidlogic, and some fancy hot-out-the-oven boats, this feisty upstart has his eyes on the podium in 2019.We visited Ferraro at his new house in Pisgah Forest to talk about first descents, running waterfalls, the Green Race, and why it pays to be a carpenter.Tell us about going off Looking Glass Falls? MJF: I’ve been looking at this thing for so long, but I hadn’t found the right water level. If it gets too high, there are these recirculating eddies on the sides that you can get caught in and at lower water it lands in a really shallow pool. It was the perfect level, so I decided to fire it up.Describe the decision-making process.MJF:  Really the scary part of making a decision to run something like this is the decision itself, committing to putting your gear on. Once I see the line and commit to doing it, I am confident I can. Looking Glass Falls is once of the most difficult runs I’ve ever kayaked. Sure, I’ve kayaked waterfalls that are taller, but never with the depth of the pool at the bottom as a factor. I avoided hitting the bottom when I went off the falls by maintaining an angle of 45 to 60 degrees. When I was at the lip of the falls, this unexpected curler crashed onto my bow, but I was still able to maintain that angle that I wanted and land and pop up at the bottom and give a big yell.You’ve descended another iconic Blue Ridge waterfall, which cannot be named for legal reasons. Can you at least describe that descent for us?MJF: There were more logistics that went into this other drop. My buddy and I had to wake up super early. We knew there would be consequences if we were caught. It’s 3:45 a.m., and we have to make a large portage in the dark; there’s no trail. We lower our boats down a ravine into the eddy above the waterfall. As the sun is coming up, we peel out. I had a good line, a little bit of a harder hit than I wanted. At this point three people have run that waterfall.How did you get the first descent of Lower Bearwallow Falls?MJF: The Toxaway is one of the most extreme rivers in North Carolina to paddle. It’s on the fringe of what’s navigable. We had to go down that gorge and then hike back up the Bearwallow, which flows into the Toxaway. We get done with all the hard stuff on the Toxaway to then go for this first descent. It was a mission. We had to rope our boats to the top of it. It’s about 40 to 50 feet tall. At low water, it doesn’t clear a shelf, and there are some trees, too. We came in with enough speed to gap over all of that. We had two clear runs on it with my buddy Jeremy Nash. He’s only 17. He shreds though; he really gets after it.    How are you finding things that haven’t been run? MJF: We’re just working hard to read books and search around on the internet. YouTube is a good resource because there’s a lot of people who hike to these waterfalls and this gives us a good idea of what the base flow looks like. We look on Rain Pursuit, Google Earth. There’s another platform, CalTopo, which is essentially maps layered on top of each other from years and years. We also hike a lot with boats on our shoulders, up to 10 miles a day.Do you currently have your eyes on another first descent?MJF: Oh yeah. There’s just so much that we’re looking at, like really small creeks that people would never even think you could kayak. In western North Carolina, there are still plenty of first descents to be had.What’s the biggest drop you’ve made?MJF:  Metlako Falls. It’s out in the Columbia River Gorge. It was 100 feet.How did you like Mexico? MJF:  Mexico was some of the best whitewater I’ve paddled and some of the best people I’ve met.Where’s your dream destination? MJF: Iceland. Epic gorges and beautiful waterfalls. There’s some first descents that we’ve been looking at over there.What are you looking forward to most about working with Liquidlogic? MJF: There’s going to be a new boat this spring. I’m really excited for that. Getting to have input on a boat really is a game-changer for me. Plus, I’m going to paddle with Pat Keller this summer on some rivers out West that have only been done once or twice.You took sixth this year at the Green Race? Were you pleased with the result?MJF: I’ve always told myself just worry about beating yourself. I kicked my own butt this year. I beat myself by seven seconds. That’s a lot. The difference between me and second place was 1.6 seconds.How do you get ready for the Green Race? MJF: This past year, all I did was go out and paddle. And my girlfriend Heather and I go and ride mountain bikes a lot. If I can get in the gym a little bit more it’ll also benefit me.Is it your goal to win that race? MJF: It is. Liquidlogic is experimenting with different types of plastic. The boat made out of this one type of plastic holds the record. I’m thinking if I can get my hands on one of those boats I can make things happen and at least get on the podium.Any other plans for 2019? MJF: I’m going to be doing some work as a carpenter. What’s nice about that is I can go kayaking when it rains.last_img read more

TRPIT reveals effect of share price fall

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Developers take an insight into sites

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UTF man calls for new mix on brownfield schemes

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PREMIUMCommunist phobia sinks Pancasila bill at House

first_imgFacebook Log in with your social account LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Forgot Password ? A coordinated campaign by Muslim organizations and Islamist political parties at the House of Representatives, which capitalized on the fear of communism, has successfully blocked the deliberation of the Pancasila Ideology Guidelines (HIP) bill, a piece of legislation proposed by the nationalist Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P).On Tuesday, following a contentious plenary session at the House involving PDI-P politicians sparring with fellow lawmakers from Muslim-based political parties, the government of President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo halted the deliberation of the HIP bill, which aims to regulate the values of the Pancasila ideology and the functions of the Agency for Pancasila Ideology Education (BPIP) – the leader of which is PDI-P chairperson and former president Megawati Soekarnoputri.Muslim organizations, including Nahdlatul Ulama (NU) and Muha… Google Linkedin Topics : ideology Islam NU Muhammadiyah DPR Pancasilalast_img read more

Wolf Administration Testifies to Benefits of Restore Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Plan

first_img Press Release,  Restore Pennsylvania Harrisburg, PA – Today, Deputy Chief of Staff Sam Robinson joined Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis Davin to testify before the joint House and Senate policy committees about the benefits of Gov. Tom Wolf’s proposed Restore Pennsylvania infrastructure investment plan.“We believe that the residents of Pennsylvania deserve to live without fear that their children will ingest toxic chemicals, which have been found in too many communities. That all Pennsylvanians deserve to live in neighborhoods that are vibrant, healthy and free of blight, brownfields and decay. To have access to well-maintained public facilities and recreational amenities. They deserve to live without fear of losing their homes to flooding,” said Robinson. “We need Restore Pennsylvania to address these challenges. We need Restore Pennsylvania to give Pennsylvanians the commonwealth they deserve.”Restore Pennsylvania will invest $4.5 billion over the next four years in significant high-impact projects throughout the commonwealth to help catapult Pennsylvania ahead of every state in the country in terms of technology, development, and infrastructure.Robinson’s full remarks, as prepared:“Chairwoman Boscola, Chairman Sturla, and members of the House and Senate Democratic Policy Committees, thank you for having me here today to discuss the Governor’s Restore Pennsylvania initiative, which was introduced last week with strong bipartisan support in both Chambers.“The Restore Pennsylvania concept was born of the Governor’s experience travelling the state, seeing the need first-hand, and hearing from frustrated officials who have seen investment in infrastructure dry up, even as the needs continue to grow.“The Governor shares his own frustration meeting with residents who were affected by flooding in last year’s unprecedented storms, and feeling like he was at a funeral, where all he could say was, “I’m sorry for your loss” without having state programs to help rebuild.“Restore was born out of that frustration and shows the Governor’s commitment to take action. The Governor convened a group of Secretaries, including Secretary Davin, as well as staff and told us to roll up our sleeves and get to work on a new path forward.“We began by identifying areas of need. Last year was the wettest year on record in Pennsylvania, resulting in over a hundred million dollars in damage to state owned infrastructure, tens of millions of dollars in property damage, and at least two deaths. PEMA reports that some 80% of the flooding that occurred happened in areas that have never flooded before.“In terms of broadband, the Federal Communications Commission estimates that approximately 800,000 Pennsylvanians lack access to reliable high-speed internet. More recently we’ve learned that the problem is even worse than we thought. According to a study released this month from the Center for Rural Pennsylvania, not one county in the state has at least 50 percent of its population receiving broadband that meets federal definitions of high-speed service.“Across the state there are some 300,000 blighted properties that need to be either renovated, or demolished and rebuilt. These properties are lowering property values, promoting unsafe conditions, and possibly leading to crime. All too often they constitute a blight on our civic pride, a signal that a community is headed the wrong way.“To date, DEP is investigating PFAs contamination at 23 sites, and unfortunately more continue to be identified as the department begins a sampling plan across the state. The cost of installing activated carbon treatments in order to ensure that water is safe on just one municipal well can run a million dollars or more.“Across our state’s 121 state parks and 2 million acres of state forest we face infrastructure needs totaling nearly $1 billion, and in every grant round, our agencies receive more applications for worthy projects for new trail connections, stormwater funding, improvements to local parks, and preservation of farms and green space than current resources allow.“These are the among the challenges that the Governor is seeking to address with Restore Pennsylvania.“Restore Pennsylvania will invest $4.5 billion over the next four years in significant high-impact projects throughout the commonwealth to help catapult forward in terms of technology, development, and infrastructure.“Since announcing this program in January, the Governor has spent the past several months speaking directly to community leaders, business owners and residents who desperately need Restore Pennsylvania.“He’s met with many of you, and toured sites in your districts that have been ravaged by flooding or are struggling to tackle danger and decay caused by blight. He’s visited schools with pealing lead paint, and communities where students struggle to do homework because the area lacks broadband internet access.“Your feedback, and those of the leaders in your communities, have helped inform the legislation that was unveiled last week. And the conversation will continue, as we look forward to working with you to pass these bills and then to implementing programs that will ensure that every Pennsylvanian, in every corner of the state benefits.“At his inauguration, the Governor spoke about a commonwealth on a comeback. We have seen that in so many ways in recent months. And Restore Pennsylvania is the next step, investing in the promise of a better Pennsylvania.“We believe that the residents of Pennsylvania deserve to live without fear that their children will ingest toxic chemicals, which have been found in too many communities.“That all Pennsylvanians deserve to live in neighborhoods that are vibrant, healthy and free of blight, brownfields and decay. To have access to well-maintained public facilities and recreational amenities.“They deserve to live without fear of losing their homes to flooding.“We need Restore Pennsylvania to address these challenges. We need Restore Pennsylvania to give Pennsylvanians the commonwealth they deserve.”Learn more about Gov. Wolf’s Restore Pennsylvania plan. Wolf Administration Testifies to Benefits of Restore Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Plan SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img June 10, 2019last_img read more

Smit Lamnalco, Engage Marine Join Forces in Aussie Towage JV

first_imgMarine services company Smit Lamnalco and port operations provider Engage Marine have invested in the Australian harbour towage joint venture, Engage Towage.The scope of the joint venture is specific to providing increased choice in the Australian harbour towage market, and therefore the existing businesses of Smit Lamnalco and Engage Marine, including Westug, would continue to operate independently from the newly formed JV.Engage Towage currently operates in the Port Jackson and the Port of Geelong utilising five azimuth-drive tugs.“We believe the Australian towage industry is significant enough for multiple towage companies to co-exist, and ultimately, competition encourages all operators to continuously improve on their service delivery,” Stanley Maas, Smit Lamnalco Chief Executive Officer, said.“We see this JV as being beneficial to clients and industry, as well as part of our own strategic growth ambition.”last_img read more

Boy, 5, killed in road crash

first_imgHis eight-year-old brother and36-year-old father Geneses Eraga, meanwhile, sustained injuries on the body, apolice report showed.  They receivedtreatment at the Corazon Locsin Montelibano Memorial Regional Hospital. BACOLOD City – A five-year-old boydied in a road crash in Barangay Mandalagan.  According to police investigation,Geneses was driving a tricycle with his two children onboard when anunidentified vehicle crashed against them around 1 a.m. on Nov. 3.   The victim, whose name was withheld byauthorities, died of body injuries, police said. Officers of Police Station 3 have yetto identify the driver of the vehicle, who fled after the incident./PNlast_img read more