Guatemala: 664 police officers added to counter-narcotics force

first_imgBy Dialogo January 11, 2013 GUATEMALA CITY – A total of 664 policemen, trained in field techniques and tactics, recently joined the fight against narco-trafficking in Guatemala, which has become a transshipment point for drugs, Minister of the Interior Mauricio López said. “This will give us an operational capability within our country and improve security along the borders Guatemala shares with El Salvador, Honduras, Belize and Mexico,” he said. Guatemalan President Otto Pérez said the new officers also would have contact with international agencies in their fight against narco-trafficking, a transnational crime. There are about 25,000 police officers in Guatemala, which has a population of about 14.3 million. Like the rest of Central America, Guatemala is home to a turf war between cartels and organized crime groups fighting for control of lucrative smuggling routes. Nearly 90% of the cocaine that reaches the United States comes through Mexico and Central America, according the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board. Guatemala is among 14 nations participating in Operation Martillo, an international mission that gathers Western Hemisphere and European nations in an effort to curtail illicit trafficking routes on both coasts of the Central American isthmus. [AFP (Guatemala), 10/01/2013; Correo del Orinoco (Venezuela), 09/01/2013]last_img read more

Accused Tampa Twitter Hacker Arraigned on 30 Felony Counts Today

first_imgSome of the other accounts Clark is accused of hacking into are former are former Vice President Joe Biden and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates.Since the hacker didn’t turn out to be a Russian or Chinese agent, maybe the FBI will offer Clark a job. (Tampa, FL) — A Florida teenager believed to be the mastermind behind a Twitter hack will be in court today to be arraigned on 30 felony counts related to last month’s incident. The 17-year-old Tampa teen is behind bars facing 30 felony charges for “scamming people across America,” according to Hillsborough State Attorney Andrew Warren.The teen is among three people facing charges for their alleged roles in the July 15 Twitter hack of prominent Twitter accounts, including that of former President Barack Obama and SpaceX founder Elon Musk. Clark is accused of hacking into the high-profile accounts and directing their followers to donate Bitcoin to accounts linked to him. Bitcoin is a crypto-currency that is extremely difficult to track.Warren calls Graham Clark was the “mastermind” behind the hack and says he is being tried as an adult.Interesting: Twitter hacker is busted in Tampa, Florida today. I guess he was a bored 17 year old, not some Russian or Chinese hacker mastermind.https://t.co/BuReuQQexE— Kevin Mitnick (@kevinmitnick) July 31, 2020last_img read more

Donegal woman launches third book on M.E. awareness – Picture Special

first_imgAn inspirational Donegal woman has released her third book on the debilitating impact of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (M.E.).Valerie Moody from St Johnston is bedridden with severe M.E. (commonly known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), but she dedicates herself to raising awareness of the disease and campaigning for local supports in Ireland.Valerie was joined by friends, family and special guests at her home on Saturday 6th July for her third and final fundraiser. John Andrew Moody, John Moody, Valerie Moody, Dinny McGinley, Ian McCracken and David Moody at the launch of Many Days a 3rd book by Valerie Moody telling of her experience of M.E. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Photo Clive WassonUsing a typewriter in bed, Valerie wrote her third book ‘Many Days’ highlighting the problems of M.E. sufferers. Her latest release has been praised as an important account which aims to change how M.E. is diagnosed before treatment can be discovered.Valerie Moody with her guests at the launch of Many Days her 3rd book telling of her experience of M.E. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Photo Clive WassonIn her speech, Valerie described M.E. as a terrible disease “that creeps silently into homes and communities unnoticed and robs the individual of almost everything except life itself especially in the more seriously affected particularly in the initial stages.”She said: “This disease should never be allowed to exist unchallenged without medical intervention.“This sadly is where the M.E. community is at today. “No M.E. experts, no M.E. Clinic, no help.”Linda Elliott and Winnie Lyttle with Valerie Moody at the launch of Many Days a 3rd book by Valerie telling of her experience of M.E. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Photo Clive WassonValerie added: “The M.E. Community are a forgotten people remaining invisible to our governments and our medical establishment.“We do need more input, more funds available for research, a better understanding of our disease and symptom recognition and definitely more empathy and acceptance within our medical establishment.”In her newest book Many Days, Valerie has written 71,000 words to give a voice to the M.E. Community.She said that Saturday’s launch was her own humble attempt to enlighten and encourage change. The book was officially launched by Former Donegal Minister Dinny McGinley. Proceeds from the event will be donated to M.E. research.See more photos from the special event, by Clive Wasson, below:Some of the crowd enjoying a cup of tea at the launch of Many Days a 3rd book by Valerie Moody telling of her experience of M.E. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Photo Clive WassonDinny McGinley speaking as he launched ” Many Days” a 3rd book by Valerie Moody telling of her experience of M.E. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Photo Clive WassonMay Lowery and Iris Long at the launch of Many Days a 3rd book by Valerie Moody telling of her experience of M.E. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Photo Clive WassonCauldwell and Loraine Smyth at the launch of Many Days a 3rd book by Valerie Moody telling of her experience of M.E. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Photo Clive WassonIrene Moody, Alan Moody, Barbara Moran and Dorothy Moody at the launch of Many Days a 3rd book by Valerie Moody telling of her experience of M.E. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Photo Clive WassonValerie Moddy at the launch of Many Days her 3rd book telling of her experience of M.E. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Photo Clive WassonIan McCracken, MC and Dinny McGinley at the launch of Many Days a 3rd book by Valerie Moody telling of her experience of M.E. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Photo Clive WassonDrew Nelson, David Moody and Lesley Matthews at the launch of Many Days a 3rd book by Valerie Moody telling of her experience of M.E. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Photo Clive WassonLorraine, Cameron and Kate Beck at the launch of Many Days a 3rd book by Valerie Moody telling of her experience of M.E. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Photo Clive WassonDonegal woman launches third book on M.E. awareness – Picture Special was last modified: July 9th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Chronic Fatigue SyndromeMyalgic Encephalomyelitisvalerie moodylast_img read more

‘Haere Ra’, Mr Ian Milne san

first_imgA fitting tribute to a mighty fine and soon to be retired ANZAC ambassador and mate. By Julian Buckmaster – @JulianTFA“You can’t kill weeds!”As with most international sporting events, the great occasion of international elite competition affords a great opportunity for respective cultures, creeds and flags and foes to converge in a mutually friendly and familiar setting and embrace.This was no more evident than at the official 2016 Trans Tasman welcome ceremony and function held in Auckland overnight. The number of pleasantries and cultural exchanges marked symbolically, and at times beautifully, the great occasion of this year’s series featuring the popular and very progressive inclusion of Japan into the Australasian biennial battle. Of particular highlight and note was the traditional Maori greeting from the local Maori elders and Polynesian strains and beats from the local house band. But in amongst the speeches and brilliant renditions of Hakas, ceremonial greetings’ and, well, some more questionable contemporary cultural renditions, was a truly stirring tribute. A tribute to a man of fine repute and a true stalwart of the sport in New Zealand and abroad.This one will live long in the memory of this fine ambassador and his equally remarkable wife, Soyra. This quiet, retiring type would probably prefer it done any other way than a full-blown presentation in front a large audience, such is his humble and modest nature. That is, to quietly retire in a more subdued and discrete fashion.But to everyone present and to all in the international community that know of the vast contributions of both he and his wife, Soyra, there could be nor more fitting opportunity and occasion. â€œAgain, you don’t in my opinion do this for what you get out of it and to be appreciated in front of your peers and countries – who are like family to us all, is a great honour and privilege” he said.“I was blown away that I received the plaque but inside the box was amazing; a blessed and rather large piece of Maori greenstone mere [traditional Maori weapon].“I will certainly treasure this as I will the memory of reception in front of the marvellous community we have come to know and love.”‘Pounamu’, the Maori word for greenstone derives from New Zealand’s South Island – some of them have a balance in them and a warmth which is the tradition for when they are blessed.  Affectionately known as “Milney” and widely regarded in New Zealand, Australia and across the world for his work as a volunteer at events including Trans-Tasman’s, Touch World Cup’s, some Pacific Nations events, he will, as they, be greatly missed.Both CEOs of Touch Football Australian and Touch New Zealand [Joe Sprangers], were effusive in their praise of the great man and his long reputation and dedication. “On behalf of the Touch Football Australia community this is outstanding recognition of Ian and Soyra, two marvellous supporters and contributors to touch Football across both sides of the Tasman,” Maguire said following Sprangers’ moving tribute and presentation to Ian.“They are such dedicated volunteers and simply amazing people and a joy to work with along with Joe and the Touch New Zealand team.”And, as they also say, behind every great man…and in front and to the side of Ian is as always his lovely and equally regarded wife, Soyra. From the global sport perspective, Bill Ker had it right on the money: “In the 46-member nations that form the federation, volunteers are the backbone of the sport and give their time and skills to each member nation in a willing manner,” he said. “None more so than Ian from New Zealand who after 20 years [NZ for the last 10], assisting NZ in a volunteer capacity with their tournament control has retired leaving a huge void left by Ian and will be temporarily filled by those whom he has up-skilled during his many roles working for New Zealand.But fittingly, the final word goes to Soyra who has been side-by-side with Ian with his long and distinguished volunteer roles.“Just because he is retiring, I’m not!” Soyra emphatically said at the announcement of Ian’s pending retirement.“So, we better find a way for him to be involved as I will still be going.  â€œHaving said that he will always want to be involved in some fashion…you can’t kill weeds!” Nor would you think the weeds would grow under this man’s feet for too long.Related LinksThanks Ian & Soyra!last_img read more

10 months agoArsenal boss Emery explains hooking Lacazette to booing fans

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Arsenal boss Emery explains hooking Lacazette to booing fansby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal boss Unai Emery accepted supporters’ jeers for hooking Alexandre Lacazette during victory over Fulham.Lacazette had put Arsenal two goals in front following Granit Xhaka’s opener but was substituted for Aaron Ramsey after Aboubakar Kamara had halved the deficit.The decision was booed by a large number of fans, although Ramsey put the game beyond doubt with the third.”I understand the supporters,” he said.”Tactically we thought in that moment we needed to change for more balance. Above all we know (Jean Michael) Seri is coming on and need a player close to him, not to let him play easily with the ball.”Aaron Ramsey can do that and also help us in attack and scored. The reason is this. I need to do my work. And not maybe because every supporter can have a different opinion, tactically.”But I need to do my work, Lacazette his work and he scored also. He helped us and it was a very positive reaction.” last_img read more

Indigenous films under the lights at Toronto film fest

first_imgAPTN National NewsSince 1976 the Toronto International Film Festival has been highlighting cinematic creativity and diversity.It is also giving Aboriginal filmmakers the platform to showcase their work.APTN National News reporter Delaney Windigo tells us what can expect at this year’s festival.last_img

NAFTAs moment of truth Coming days could decide whether deal happens this

first_imgWASHINGTON – A moment of truth approaches in the NAFTA negotiations, with the coming days likely to reveal not only whether an agreement is achievable this year, but also how extensive such an agreement might be.Even participants at the negotiating table profess to be in suspense about how the United States will proceed, should it finally secure its much-coveted deal on autos.One thing everyone appears to agree on is that if a pact doesn’t happen soon, the prospects of one happening this year dim considerably: U.S. trade czar Robert Lighthizer has pegged the window at one or two weeks.Autos will be the first order of business when ministers gather Monday in Washington, in an effort to seal an agreement before elections in Mexico and the U.S. Congress slow the process.Any potential agreement hinges on the ability of Mexico and the U.S. to bridge a key ideological gap: in an effort to steer manufacturing north, the U.S.’s latest demand is that 40 per cent of every car be produced in high-wage jurisdictions, with some credit for spending on research.Mexico is set to deliver a counter-offer.The great unknown is what happens next, if the U.S. and Mexico make peace on the auto file. Would the U.S. stick to a series of hardline positions, or rush through the rest to wrap everything up?”That … probably is the crux of what happens next,” said one person familiar with the talks.”One does not know … how the next week will play out.”More than a half-dozen groups have been meeting in recent days to try clearing the non-controversial issues off the table, so the ministers can focus on the hardest political trade-offs.For example, one group met to discuss customs procedures, but avoided the toughest of all customs issues: online purchases and whether Canada will move its meagre $20 duty-free level closer to the U.S.’s $800 limit.One person who has closely followed the career and methods of U.S. trade czar Robert Lighthizer believes he is now deploying two textbook tactics in pursuit of a deal.The first is to create a deadline threat. This person, who asked to remain anonymous, calls the tactic, ”the death machine” — where some fearsome fate awaits your counterpart, in the absence of a deal. In this case, steel and aluminum tariffs are set to kick in June 1.The second is to make a bunch of difficult demands, some of which truly matter and some of which are a bluff, a thing to be traded off.This person suspects Lighthizer’s true goals involve autos, and the dispute-resolution systems under chapters 11 and 19 — and that the other, more expendable, demands involve dairy and duty-free purchases.”Bob is a good negotiator,” this person said. ”He uses the methods of a good negotiator.”He predicts the biggest confrontation with Canada will involve Chapter 19 — which Lighthizer has long resented as a violation of U.S. sovereignty, but which was a do-or-die issue for Canada in the original NAFTA, allowing companies like softwood-lumber producers to fight punitive duties.Other U.S. industries say their causes cannot be ignored.The pharmaceutical industry wants changes in the way drug prices are set; it wants more transparency and appeal rights, as well as longer patent-style protections on biologics treatments.The industry has powerful support in the U.S. Congress. Its most famous backer, Sen. Orrin Hatch, leads one of the two key committees that would be responsible for driving through any NAFTA implementing legislation before the current Congress leaves office.”Intellectual property remains a very high priority for (the administration),” said trade lawyer Brian Pomper, who works on such issues.”And that’s not dissimilar, to be honest, from lots of other (U.S.) administrations. You know, IP is not a partisan issue.”Pomper, a former counsel on the committee Hatch now leads, suggests an agreement in the next month could theoretically get to a vote well before the current Congress wraps up in December if lawmakers like the deal and move quickly, or if the arm’s-length U.S. International Trade Commission manages to complete a review ahead of deadlines.”You can do it pretty quickly,” Pomper said.”(But) if Congress has concerns about it, as you saw with (the Trans-Pacific Partnership in 2016), that could really delay consideration.”One trade consultant says there’s another reason the U.S. might be in a hurry. It arose thousands of kilometres away this week in Beijing where, amid looming threats of a U.S.-China trade war, the two countries failed to reconcile their differences.With this potential clash of economic titans approaching, Eric Miller said the U.S. trade team is short-staffed. That means Lighthizer’s team can’t afford to spend much more time focusing on Canada and Mexico.”The push for a NAFTA deal is going to be there next week,” Miller said.He said the U.S. will either accept modest changes and reach a deal, or let NAFTA sit unfinished for the year.“Either way, it’s going to be a lot more China and a lot less North American on the U.S. agenda in the coming months.”last_img read more

This years Poppy Campaign is off to a great start

first_imgSo far, over the weekend, the Cadets have raised approximately $15,000 for the poppy campaign.Nicoll hopes this trend will continue throughout the campaign and he feels that it all depends on the day and location of where the cadets are campaigning.This year’s campaign goal is to raise $45,000, up $10,000 more than last year’s campaign.The Canadian Legion invites everyone across the country to show their recognition and respect by proudly wearing this symbol of Remembrance and taking a moment to reflect. From now to November 11 the City of Fort St. John will also fly a Poppy Campaign Flag at City Hall.Remembrance Day ceremonies in Fort St. John takes place Sunday, November 11, with a parade at 10 a.m. starting at the legion. A service will follow in the legion auditorium. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The annual Remembrance Day Poppy Campaign is going strong in the first half of this year’s fundraiser.Capt. Greg Nicoll of the Fort St. John Army Cadets, says the campaign is off to a great start.“We’ve been doing very well. Good turnout from the cadets and the public has been really generous”, said Nicoll. Each year the Legion relies on volunteers to help sell poppies at stores all around the community.  For more info or to volunteer call Tina at 250-261-9996.last_img read more

Brent oil hits 6month high above 75 barrel

first_imgLondon: Brent North Sea crude hit a six-month high above $75 per barrel Thursday on supply concerns that have been worsened by the United States tightening the screw on sanctions-hit Iran. Brent for delivery in June jumped to $75.42 per barrel, the highest level since late October. Oil’s other main contract, WTI, reached a six-month peak at $66.16 per barrel. The US removal this week of waivers that allowed countries to buy from sanctions-hit Iran is expected to hit oil supplies, though analysts are keeping watch on the region and whether OPEC responds by opening up the taps. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalOil prices had already enjoyed a strong recovery this year, with output capped by Russia and the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Crude futures have won support additionally on unrest in OPEC members Venezuela and Libya. “The US government’s decision not to extend the exemptions from the Iranian sanctions… is still having after-effects,” analysts at Commerzbank said in a note to clients after Brent surpassed $75 per barrel. Oil kingpin Saudi Arabia meanwhile on Wednesday said it had no immediate plans to raise oil output to offset the move by Washington. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostSaudi energy minister Khalid al-Falih insisted that global oil inventories continued to rise despite unrest in Venezuela and the tougher US action. Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei on Wednesday called the end of oil sanction waivers by the United States a “hostile measure” that “won’t be left without a response”. “US efforts to boycott the sale of Iran’s oil won’t get them anywhere. We will export our oil as much as we need and we intend,” his official English-language Twitter account said, quoting from a speech he delivered to workers in Tehran. The United States on Monday said it would halt the practice of exempting countries including India, China and Turkey from sanctions on purchases of Iranian oil. In May last year, US President Donald Trump withdrew Washington from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal with world powers, which had given the Islamic republic sanctions relief in exchange for curbs on its nuclear programme. Around 0900 GMT, Brent North Sea crude traded at 75.23 per barrel, up 66 cents from Wednesday’s close. WTI gained 21 cents at 66.10 per barrel.last_img read more

Defensive decorator Former Buckeye Malcolm Jenkins might try his hand at interior

Former Ohio State All-American cornerback Malcolm Jenkins is in the same boat as every other NFL player: locked out of football. With time on his hands, Jenkins might get his creative juices flowing. “I was up at Ohio State’s practice, lobbying to get a coaching job,” Jenkins said. “Either coaching or I’ve been watching a lot of HGTV. I might try to get into some interior designing or something.” Locked out for more than a month, the NFL and the NFL Players Association have yet to reach an agreement on collective bargaining. “Every player is enjoying the time off,” Jenkins said, “not having as many responsibilities as far as mandatory workouts, to be able to take some time off and be with family, stuff like that.” Jenkins, who plays for the New Orleans Saints, said the urge to get back to his usual spring schedule is starting to grow. “Guys are wanting to get together and do our own workouts together, just get back to football,” Jenkins said. “Guys are starting to itch and want to get back on the field.” If the NFL lockout does not end and Jenkins can’t find a different job, he said he will be able to survive without a paycheck for a while, though he fears that some won’t be as financially comfortable. “We’ve known about this for two years now,” Jenkins said. “Me personally, I’ve prepared for it. But I know for a fact that there are some guys who may not have saved like they needed to. “It will impact some guys, but hopefully over the last few years, guys have followed the plan and been smart with their money.” Something players might not be prepared for is human growth hormone testing, which NFL commissioner Roger Goodell says must be part of the new collective bargaining agreement. The test, which would require blood to be drawn, has received criticism, both positive and negative, from the NFL players and their union. Jenkins said he wasn’t sure what was involved in HGH testing but that he can understand why some players are against it. “I talked to someone yesterday who said they had to take blood,” he said. “When you do that, you get tired. If you get a surprise HGH test on a Friday and you’ve got to play on a Sunday, that can have some effect on your performance.” Jenkins said he doesn’t think HGH is a problem in the NFL. “I don’t think our league is played with that,” he said. “I don’t see (HGH testing as) necessary.” Jenkins said he thinks there will be football but that he doesn’t know if it will be in time for teams to prepare the way they normally do. “Depending on how long this thing goes, if you miss the whole offseason, from a teaching and learning standpoint, young players don’t get as much time as they usually have,” Jenkins said. “We’re really going to have to go back to the basics because there’s no spring ball or (anything) like that. “Rookie players, the chances of them making it shrinks. They have less time to make that learning curve.” Although no one is sure of a time frame for players to get back to work, Jenkins said he’s confident that it is a matter of when football starts rather than if it starts. “There’s a good chance for football,” he said. “I think there’s going to be football.” read more