Interwetten announces Greek Super League sponsorship

first_img Regions: Europe Southern Europe Greece Austrian online gambling operator Interwetten has signed a deal with the Greek Super League, the top level of football in Greece, to become the league’s official sports betting partner for the 2019-20 season.The company’s branding will appear on LED boards at stadiums and interview boards as well as in other locations, while the company can also take advantage of digital integrations with Greek Super League channels and a hospitality package for every league match.“Greece is and will remain a very important market for us. That’s why we want to continue to invest in the sport here and expand our position,” Interwetten chief executive Dominik Beier said. “The Super League is an ideal partner in this respect thanks to its national and weekly presence.“It opens up a multitude of communication and activation opportunities for us throughout the country.”The deal follows the announcement in August that Interwetten would sponsor Greek Super League team Asteras Tripolis. The company also revealed in August that it would sponsor Bundesliga club VfL Wolfsburg. Austrian online gambling operator Interwetten has signed a deal with the Greek Super League to become the league’s official sports betting partner for the 2019-20 season. Email Address Sports betting AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwittercenter_img Topics: Sports betting Strategy Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter 1st October 2019 | By Daniel O’Boyle Interwetten announces Greek Super League sponsorshiplast_img read more

England v Australia Preview – Back England with eight point start!

first_imgHead-to-head: You’ve guessed it, the front-rows. Dan Cole has shown time and time again for Leicester that he can mix it with the best and the return of Andrew Sheridan has been a blessing in the same way that Ben Alexander’s comeback has been to the Wallabies.Previous results:2010: England won 21-20 in Sydney2010: Australia won 27-17 in Perth2009: Australia won 18-9 in London2008: Australia won 28-14 in London2007: England won 12-10 in Marseille (RWC)2006: Australia won 43-18 in Melbourne2006: Australia won 34-3 in Sydney2005: England won 26-16 in London2004: Australia won 21-19 in London2004: Australia won 51-15 in Brisbane2003: England won 20-17 in Sydney (RWC)Prediction: A tough one to call, but I can see David Pocock shining. Australia by 6!The teams: England: 15 Ben Foden, 14 Chris Ashton, 13 Mike Tindall, 12 Shontayne Hape, 11 Mark Cueto, 10 Toby Flood, 9 Ben Youngs, 8 Nick Easter, 7 Lewis Moody (capt), 6 Tom Croft, 5 Tom Palmer, 4 Courtney Lawes, 3 Dan Cole, 2 Dylan Hartley, 1 Andrew Sheridan.Replacements: 16 Steve Thompson, 17 David Wilson, 18 Simon Shaw, 19 Hendrie Fourie, 20 Danny Care, 21 Charlie Hodgson, 22 Delon Armitage.Australia: 15 Kurtley Beale, 14 James O’Connor, 13 Adam Ashley-Cooper, 12 Matt Giteau, 11 Drew Mitchell, 10 Quade Cooper, 9 Will Genia, 8 Ben McCalman, 7 David Pocock, 6 Rocky Elsom (capt), 5 Nathan Sharpe, 4 Mark Chisholm, 3 Ben Alexander, 2 Stephen Moore, 1 Benn Robinson.Replacements: 16 Huia Edmonds, 17 James Slipper, 18 Dean Mumm, 19 Richard Brown, 20 Luke Burgess, 21 Berrick Barnes, 22 Lachie Turner.Date: Saturday, November 13Venue: Twickenam, LondonKick-off: 14:30Referee: Craig Joubert (South Africa)Assistant referees: Christophe Berdos (France), Simon Mcdowell (Ireland) England manager Martin Johnson always laughs when a journalist asks him about ‘must win’ games. Well he would wouldn’t he as what coach would paint himself in a corner, admitting a match is must win. But this is the game that England must turn themselves into contenders, rather than nearly men. Once again in this fixture, the scrum becomes the pre-game focal point as Wales were the latest nation to get the better of Australia. But will that be enough to overcome Australia’s outrageously talented backs. It was in Sydney in the summer but not in Perth a week before.Most of the bookies give England a 3-4 point start which I think is fair on current form, apart from the outrageous Blue Square and 888 Sport who give England an 8-point start. My advice is to get on board here as that is too good to miss, following up on my tip last week to bet England with a 12-point start.Like Wales, England were also strong up front against their opening southern opponents, and that doesn’t bode well for the Wallabies. However, this week Martin Johnson has opted not to stick with the out-and-out bulk of Steve Thompson alongside Dan Cole and Andrew Sheridan, who all put in impressive set-piece performances against the All Blacks. Instead he rewards Dylan Hartley for his abrasive spell in the second-half. Some say he should be banned following an act on Richie McCaw…I leave to you to be the judge.Hartley is the only change to the starting line-up made by Johnson while lock Simon Shaw takes the place of Dave Attwood in the number 18 jersey. The Wallabies meanwhile have gone for all but one of the XV that escaped the Millennium Stadium with an efficient win.Then it was over to Welford Road on Tuesday with Robbie Deans admitting in the post-match he was impressed by that pack, but it cannot be downplayed just how the scrum could affect how things pan out on Saturday. We have witnessed in the past that English rugby’s HQ is buzzing when their eight is moving forward so Australia must step up to the plate if they are to allow Quade Cooper decent ball upon which to work his magic.Another man enjoying his rugby at present is Kurtley Beale. It seems strange to label it as a ‘second coming’ as he is still only 21, but the Waratahs full-back has found something he didn’t have when he was thrown into the mix for his franchise back in 2007. Pace to burn and an eye for what is going on around him nowadays, he has also attracted praise from his own team-mate Drew Mitchell who is loving Beale’s ‘instinctive’ mindset.Maybe he is the missing piece of the jigsaw for Australia, a squad that is developing into serious World Cup contenders ahead of next year. A further boost is a favourable draw as – going on form – they should avoid both New Zealand and South Africa until the big finale.England also cannot be written off in 2011 if we are to study recent improved performances – last week’s effort proving that June 19’s victory in Sydney was no fluke. Despite this, Australia go into Saturday’s game as favourites with the bookies and one would have to agree rightly so. But whether they can front up at scrum-time and go some way better than their humiliation in Cardiff is the aching doubt. We all know they have the answers wider out.The return of hooker Stephen Moore is the only change to the Qantas Wallabies’ squad to contest Saturday’s Cook Cup Test against England in London.The Australian rake was a last-minute withdrawal from last weekend’s 25-16 win over Wales in Cardiff, succumbing to a back complaint during the side’s warm-up.Moore’s naming reunites the front row that represented the Qantas Wallabies in the corresponding Test in 2009, with Moore (broken jaw), Ben Alexander (knee) and Benn Robinson (broken arm) ruled out of June’s two-Test series against England through injury.Huia Edmonds, who was a late inclusion into last week’s squad to face the Dragons, retains his place on the bench, with Saia Faingaa dropping out of the match day squad.Deans says Moore, who claimed man-of-the-match honours against England at Twickenham in 2008, will provide significant leadership within the squad for the Twickenham encounter.“Steve’s a 50 Test-plus player, so he brings with him a wealth of experience,” he said. “He’s played at Twickenham on a number of occasions – including last year, as has our starting front row.“We have 10 players returning from the corresponding fixture last year and that experience is invaluable. Twickenham’s a great venue to play; it’s the bastion of English rugby and they love to get behind their team and use the facility to their advantage, so the more guys that have played there the better.”In addition to their front row, the Qantas Wallabies feature another nine players who were involved in the 18-9 win over England at Twickenham last year including Adam Ashley-Cooper, Mark Chisholm, Quade Cooper, Rocky Elsom, Matt Giteau, Drew Mitchell, Dean Mumm, David Pocock and Will Genia, who not only crossed for a try in that fixture but was also named man of the match.Ashley-Cooper, who will move to within one cap of his 50th Test on Saturday, will again form a midfield partnership with Giteau, who scored all 20 of Australia’s points during the two sides’ last encounter in June, which England won 21-20 in Sydney.Having starred for the Qantas Wallabies against Wales, man of the match and fullback Kurtley Beale will combine with wingers Drew Mitchell and James O’Connor in the Australian back three.The retention of Edmonds leaves the Qantas Wallabies’ bench untouched from the one that fronted Wales at Millennium Stadium, including reserve forwards James Slipper, Dean Mumm and Richard Brown, and backs Luke Burgess, Berrick Barnes and Lachie Turner. The seven-man run-on reserves list – along with Giteau – make up the eight player contingent who will back up from the Qantas Wallabies’ 26-15 win over the Leicester Tigers at Welford Road on Tuesday night (Wednesday morning AEDT).Deans says last weekend’s match against Wales provided a strong foundation for his side to build upon.“We’ll be better off on a number of fronts,” he said. “Not only will several elements within our game have benefited, but we won’t have to travel halfway around the globe at the front end of the week and we’ll be better for that as well.“We’re under no illusions about what we’re up against this weekend. England played very well against New Zealand. They would have been hopeful for more out of that encounter in terms of the result, but they played some good rugby.“We believe this will be a step up for us based on what we witnessed in the English performance [against the All Blacks] last week, and it’s important that we make that step.”The Qantas Wallabies will endeavour to reach their 100-try milestone against England this weekend, having registered 99 touchdowns in 39 Tests between the two countries.Ones to watch: For England: Not long ago he insisted that his bad temper was well-and-truly behind him. But last Saturday’s antics proved that Dylan Hartley still has a job controlling himself. This week he gets a start and will be looking to get under the skin of his opponents. Australia may be the ones looking to get amongst him though and rightly so as if Hartley doesn’t keep his cool then South African official Craig Joubert might be reaching for his pocket.For Australia: I have already mentioned him. Kurtley Beale has made the number fifteen jersey his own over the past few months and possesses a step, pace and intelligence that saw Wales the latest to struggle with him. If he’s on his game then England are in trouble. Television match official: Jim Yuille (Scotland)center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Delta Airlines: Delays and Cancellation Update

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter The Anatomy of Fear You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your comment! Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSDelta Airlines Previous articleControlled burns coming to ApopkaNext articleAPD Officer a SWAT team member during Pulse shootings Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UPDATE: As of 3:00 PM EDT there were 28 delayed Delta arrivals and 45 delayed Delta departures showing on the flight status website for Orlando International Airport. Only a handful of flights show no delays.  Only 4 flights had been cancelled.Before heading to the airport check your flight status at Orlando International Airport here.Delta is advising passengers that if your flight is canceled or significantly delayed, you are entitled to a refund. Even if your flight is not canceled, you may make a one-time change to your ticket without being change a fee. Use this link for details. Due to the heavy volume of calls, you may experience a busy signal and longer than expected wait times.*****UPDATE – As of 8:40 a.m. eastern time the Delta ground stop has been lifted and limited departures are resuming . Cancellations and delays continue. Customers heading to the airport should expect delays and cancellations.According to Delta Airlines all flights were delayed beginning at 5:05 am this morning due to a power failure in Atlanta that resulted in computer outages and operations worldwide. All flight status systems, including airport screens were showing incorrect flight times. Customers heading to the airport should expect some delays.Delta says that inquiries are high and wait times are long. Customer service agents are doing everything they can to assist. There may also be some lag time in the display of accurate flight status at delta.com, the Fly Delta App and from Delta representatives on the phone and in airport.Before you head out check your flight status at Orlando International Airport here.A travel waiver is in effect: http://www.delta.com/content/www/en_US/traveling-with-us/advisories/system-outage.html.The Apopka Voice will be monitoring this situation and will post updates as more details are known. Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

European Foundations and Grant-Making NGOs

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 16 July 2008 | News Tagged with: Funding  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img European Foundations and Grant-Making NGOs About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

The Grand Appeal wins Fundraising Team of the Year at Charity Times Awards

first_img Tagged with: Awards Melanie May | 3 October 2016 | News Advertisement About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. The Grand Appeal has won Fundraising Team of the Year (with an income over £5m) at last month’s Charity Times Awards for its Shaun the Sheep fundraising sculpture trail.The trail raised more than £1m for Bristol Children’s Hospital and children’s hospitals and hospices across the UK, attracting over 1m visitors keen to track down the 70 sculptures dotted around the city. The Grand Appeal also won Highly Commended in the Fundraising Technology category, for its Shaun in the City: Sheep Spotter app.The app was developed with Aardman’s digital team and topped the official App Store chart within 24 hours of launching. Voted one of the best apps of 2015 by Google, it was downloaded more than 80,000 times in total, with The Grand Appeal receiving proceeds from every purchase.The Grand Appeal is celebrating its 21st anniversary this year, and has generated £40million for Bristol Children’s Hospital during this time.Bowel Cancer UK won Charity of the Year, for championing early diagnosis of bowel cancer and improving access to best treatment and care for all those closely affected by the disease. It was also shortlisted for the Charity Times Awards Campaigning Team of the Year for its Never Too Young campaign, which aims to improve the diagnosis, treatment and care of people under the age of 50 with bowel cancer.Winners included:Charity of the Year: with an income of more than £10 millionRefugeCharity of the Year: with an income of £1 million – £10 millionBowel Cancer UKHighly commended: SignhealthCharity of the Year: with an income of less than £1 millionTyne Gateway TrustOutstanding Individual AchievementTony ElischerBest New CharityThe Tutor TrustInternational CharityBRACChange Project of the YearParkinson’s UKCampaigning Team of the YearDiabetes UKFundraising Team of the Year with an income under £5mCommunity Foundation for CalderdaleFundraising Team of the Year with an income over £5 millionThe Grand AppealBest Use of TechnologyAutism East MidlandsBest Use of the WebShelterFundraising Technology AwardCancer Research UKHighly commended: The Grand AppealCommunity AwardFor JimmyHighly commended: Newham All Star Sports AcademyCorporate Community Local InvolvementBank of New York/BNY Mellon/Community LinksCorporate National Partnership ChampionMissing People & OutsmartCorporate National Partnership of the Year with a Financial InstitutionPlace2Be & Bank of America Merrill LynchHighly commended: The Prince’s Trust & NatWestCorporate National Partnership of the Year with a RetailerOxfam & WaterstonesCorporate Social Responsibility Project of the YearSamaritans, Network Rail & Rail Industry Suicide Stakeholder GroupCross-sector Partnership of the YearThe Scout Association, Canal & River Trust, Alzheimer’s Society, Leonard Cheshire Disability, Guide Dogs, Mind, and Water AidPicture: Suzanne Maverick and Kate Jones from The Grand Appeal receiving their Charity Times Award  61 total views,  1 views todaycenter_img The Grand Appeal wins Fundraising Team of the Year at Charity Times Awards AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis9  62 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis9last_img read more

More resources needed for gardai and Courts Service in Donegal – Shiels

first_img Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Facebook Pinterest Google+ Facebook Homepage BannerNews Pinterest A Donegal County Councillor has asked the Council to write to the Minister for Justice, calling for sufficient resources to the Gardai and Court Services in Donegal.There have been concerns that both services are not up to the standard they need to be to address crime in the county.Councillor Dessie Shiels raised the issue this week saying that particularly for people living in rural Donegal, there isn’t the same access to crime prevention services and something must be done.He says there is a sharp contrast between the services provided in Donegal compared to Dublin….Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/dessiresources.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Twitter 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic More resources needed for gardai and Courts Service in Donegal – Shiels 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North center_img WhatsApp Google+ Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th By admin – November 12, 2015 Previous articleIrish MEPs to question ECB President on banking crisisNext articleMinister criticised over toxic barrels response admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Twitter Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal last_img read more

SENAFRONT’s Special Forces Strengthen Capabilities

first_imgBy Roberto López Dubois/Diálogo September 10, 2019 The Special Forces Group (AFFE, in Spanish) of the Panamanian National Border Service (SENAFRONT, in Spanish) strengthened its capabilities in troop leadership, decision making, improvised explosive device deactivation, aeromedical evacuation techniques, and planning during retraining sessions led by the U.S. military at the headquarters of SENAFRONT’s Eastern Brigade in Metetí village, Darién province, near the Colombian border.“These exercises are covered under agreements between Panama and the United States that enable security updates and technological preparation to confront new threats,” Major Oriel De Gracia, who led AFFE during the training, told Diálogo. “In addition, other existing threats in the country, such as narcotrafficking, constantly change, and they [U.S. service members] have a lot of useful information to counter these crimes.”“In some places, units must have special skills to enter due to the difficult terrain or the need to confront organized crime, such as narcotraffickers. To that end, constant training is necessary,” said Maj. De Gracia.According to AFFE First Sergeant Oldemar Pinto, who participated in the training, the experience was beneficial, because “as a commando, you need to know a little bit of everything, never stop learning to keep up to date, and understand that training leads to success.”Other skills practiced included aeromedical evacuation maneuvers with helicopters in hard-to-reach areas, in this case, the jungle. The training coincided with the delivery, from the U.S. government, of six UH-1H helicopters for SENAFRONT forces, in late June. The handover, according to Roxanne Cabral, Chargé d’Affaires at the U.S. Embassy in Panama, seeks to support security forces to “erect a protective barrier around the Darién area to curb criminal activities and protect its citizens.”AFFE focuses on countering organized crime, such as drug, human, and arms trafficking, and other high-risk criminal activities. In early August, authorities captured a Sri Lankan national at the Colombian border who attempted to enter the country and had a red security alert for his connections to organized crime. In late July, AFFE units also detained two Panamanians in Darién for the illicit trafficking of more than 100 migrants. In the same period, SENAFRONT seized more than 1,500 kilograms of cocaine in the region.last_img read more

Proposed criminal jury instructions

first_img 1. that an image was created by using, installing or permitting the use of an imaging device, Give 2a or 2b as applicable 2. a. to secretly view, broadcast, or record a person, without that person’s knowledge and consent, Aggravated assault784.021(1)(a)8.2 AGGRAVATED BATTERY ON PREGNANT WOMAN – 784.045(1)(b) This instruction was adopted in 1981 and amended in 1989 , and in 2005, by adding the Inferences in § 812.022(2)-(5), Fla. Stat. 27.1 ESCAPE § 944.40, Fla. Stat. To prove the crime of Escape, the State must prove the following three elements beyond a reasonable doubt:1. ( Defendant) was [under arrest and in the lawful custody of a law enforcement official]. [convicted of a crime and sentenced to a term of imprisonment and committed to (institution alleged) by a court]. Give 2a, 2b, or 2c as applicable 2. While a prisoner, (defendant) was a . [confined at (name of institution).] b . [being transported to or from a place of confinement.] c . [working on a public road]. 3. (Defendant) escaped or attempted to escape by (read overt act from charge), intending to avoid lawful confinement. Give if requested and applicable. See Kearse v. State, 662 So. 2d 677 (Fla. 1995) and Applewhite v. State, 874 So. 2d 1276 (Fla. 5th DCA 2004). “Transportation to a place of confinement” begins at the time an individual is placed under arrest. An “arrest” takes place when the arresting officer intends to arrest; the arresting officer actually or constructively seizes the person to be arrested; the officer’s intent to arrest is communicated by the arresting officer to the person to be arrested; and the person to be arrested understands that communication. An “arrest” does not require that the law enforcement officer complete the act of acquiring total physical control over the person to be arrested. Lesser Included Offenses This instruction was adopted in 1981 and amended in 1989 and 2005. Assault784.0118.1 , as a Word document. Please entitle the Subject – SJIC Comments 01-01-06. 8.4 AGGRAVATED BATTERY 784.045, Fla. Stat. To prove the crime of Aggravated Battery, the State must prove the following two elements beyond a reasonable doubt. The first element is a definition of battery. 1. (Defendant) [intentionally touched or struck (victim) against [his] [her] will] [intentionally caused bodily harm to (victim) ]. Give 2a or 2b as applicable. 2. (Defendant) in committing the battery CATEGORY ONECATEGORY TWOFLA. STAT.INS. NO. Comment This instruction was approved in 2005. See Small v State , 889 So.2d 862. 11.1 SEXUAL BATTERY — VICTIM LESS THAN 12 YEARS OF AGE § 794.011(2), Fla. Stat. To prove the crime of Sexual Battery upon a Person Less Than 12 Years of Age, the State must prove the following two elements beyond a reasonable doubt: 1. (Victim) was less than 12 years of age. 2. a. [ (Defendant) committed an act [upon] [with] (victim) in which the sexual organ of the [ (defendant) ] [ (victim) ] penetrated or had union with the [anus] [vagina] [mouth] of the [ (victim) ] [ (defendant) ]. b. [(Defendant) committed an act upon (victim) in which the [anus] [vagina] of (victim) was penetrated by an object.] < p> c. [(Defendant) injured the sexual organ of (victim) in an attempt to commit an act [upon] [with] (victim) in which the sexual organ of the [(defendant)] [(victim)] would have penetrated or would have had union with the [anus] [vagina] [mouth] of the [(victim)] [(defendant)].] < p> d. [(Defendant) injured the sexual organ of (victim) in an attempt to commit an act upon (victim) in which the [anus] [vagina] of (victim) would be penetrated by an object.] < p>3.a.(Defendant) was 18 years of age or older at the time of the sexual battery or b.(Defendant) was less than 18 years of age at the time of the sexual battery. The punishment provided by law for sexual battery upon a person less than 12 years of age is greater depending upon the age of the defendant. Therefore, if you find the defendant guilty of sexual battery upon a person less than 12 years of age and you further find that at the time of the sexual battery the defendant was 18 years of age or older, you should find [him] [her] guilty of sexual battery upon a person less than 12 years of age by a person 18 years of age or older. If you find that the defendant was not 18 years of age or older but did commit the sexual battery, you should find [him] [her] guilty only of sexual battery upon a person less than 12 years of age by a person under 18 years of age. < p>Give if applicable. However, any act done for bona fide medical purposes is not a sexual battery. < p>Definition. Give if applicable “Union” means contact. < p>In the event that multiple perpetrators is charged and proven, give instruction on enhancement, § 794.023, Fla. Stat. < p>The option of the word “[with] (victim)” in 2a and 2c is provided to reflect the manner in which the crime was committed. See Coleman v. State, 484 So.2d 624 (Fla. 1st DCA 1986), at pages 627, 628. Lesser Included Offenses Give 3a or 3b as applicable 3. a. who was dressing, undressing, or privately exposing the body, at a place and time when that person had a reasonable expectation of privacy, or b. for the purpose of viewing the body of, or the undergarments worn by, another person, without that person’s knowledge or consent, Aggravated battery784.045(1)(a)8.4 a. [ intentionally or knowingly caused [great bodily harm to (victim) ] ] [permanent disability to (victim) ] ] [permanent disfigurement to (victim) ] ] . b. [ used a deadly weapon. ] c. [knew or should have known that (victim) was pregnant.] or b. to secretly view, broadcast, or record under or through the clothing being worn by another person, without that person’s knowledge and consent, Give 3a or 3b as applicable 3. a. who was dressing, undressing, or privately exposing the body, at a place and time when that person had a reasonable expectation of privacy, or Attempt777.04(1)5.1 Proposed criminal jury instructionsThe Supreme Court Committee on Standard Jury Instructions in Criminal Cases submits the following amended or new instructions to the Standard Jury Instructions in Criminal Cases and invites all persons to comment to the Committee on the proposals. The Committee invites all interested persons to comment on the proposals, which are reproduced in full below. After reviewing the comments received in response to this publication, the Committee will make final recommendations to the Florida Supreme Court. Comments must be received by the Committee in CATEGORY ONECATEGORY TWOFLA. STAT.INS. NO. Definition . g G ive if 2b alleged . A weapon is a “deadly weapon” if it is used or threatened to be used in a way likely to produce death or great bodily harm. Lesser Included Offenses AGGRAVATED BATTERY — 784.045(1)(a) January 1, 2006 Regular News Battery784.038.3 Attempt777.04(1)5.1 b. Having created the image, disseminates, distributes, or transfers the image to another person to sell to others. CATEGORY ONECATEGORY TWOFLA. STAT.INS. NO. both hard copy and electronic format on or before January 20, 2006 Give 1a or 1b as applicable. 1. a. The (defendant), for [his] [her] own amusement, entertainment, sexual arousal, gratification, or profit, or for the purpose of degrading or abusing another person, or b. T he (defendant), for the amusement, entertainment, sexual arousal, gratification, or profit of another, or on behalf of another, 2. intentionally used, or installed, or permitted the use or installation of an imaging device, 3. to secretly view, broadcast, or record a person without that person’s knowledge and consent, 4. who was dressing, undressing, or privately exposing the body, at a place and time when that person had a reasonable expectation of privacy. Definitions “ Imaging device” means any mechanical, digital, or electronic viewing device, still camera, camcorder, motion picture camera, or any other instrument, equipment, or format capable of recording, storing, or transmitting visual images of another person. “Broadcast” means electronically transmitting a visual image with the intent that it be viewed by another person. “Privately exposing the body” means exposing a sexual organ. “A place and time when that person had a reasonable expectation of privacy” means a place and time when a reasonable person would believe that he or she could fully disrobe in privacy, without being concerned that the person’s undressing was being viewed, recorded, or broadcast by another, including, but not limited to, the interior of a bathroom, changing room, fitting room, dressing room, or tanning booth. § 810.145(5)(a – d), Fla. Stat. Give if applicable. The crime of video voyeurism does not apply to any: a. law enforcement agency conducting surveillance for a law enforcement purpose; b. security system, when a written notice is conspicuously posted on the premises stating that a video surveillance system has been installed for the purpose of security for the premises; c. video surveillance device installed in such a manner that the presence of the device is clearly and immediately obvious; or d. dissemination, distribution, or transfer of images by a provider of a electronic communication service or a provider of a remote computing service. Lesser Included Offenses No lesser included offenses have been identified for this offense. Comment This instruction was adopted in 2005. 11.15 VIDEO VOYEURISM § 810.145(2)(c), Fla. Stat. To prove the crime of Video Voyeurism, the State must prove the following five elements beyond a reasonable doubt. 1. The (defendant), for the amusement, entertainment, sexual arousal, gratification, or profit of [himself] [herself] or another, or on behalf of [himself] [herself] or another, 2. intentionally used an imaging device, 3. to secretly view, broadcast, or record under or through the clothing being worn by another person, 4. without that person’s knowledge and consent, 5. for the purpose of viewing the body of, or the undergarments worn by, that person. Definitions “Imaging device” means any mechanical, digital, or electronic viewing device, still camera, camcorder, motion picture camera, or any other instrument, equipment, or format capable of recording, storing, or transmitting visual images of another person. “Broadcast” means electronically transmitting a visual image with the intent that it be viewed by another person. Give if applicable. § 810.145(5)(a),(b),(c),or (d). The crime of video voyeurism does not apply to any: a. law enforcement agency conducting surveillance for a law enforcement purpose; b. security system, when a written notice is conspicuously posted on the premises stating that a video surveillance system has been installed for the purpose of security for the premises; c. video surveillance device installed in such a manner that the presence of the device is clearly and immediately obvious; or d. dissemination, distribution, or transfer of images by a provider of a electronic communication service. Lesser Included Offenses No lesser included offenses have been identified for this offense. Comment This instruction was adopted in 2005. 11.16 VIDEO VOYEURISM DISSEMINATION § 810.145(3), Fla. Stat. To prove the crime of Video Voyeurism Dissemination, the State must prove the following four elements beyond a reasonable doubt. The (defendant) knew or had reason to believe, center_img Discharging a firearms in public790.1510.6 [email protected] Battery784.038.3 Battery784.03 8.3 Felony battery784.0418.5 Comment Attempt777.04(1)5.1 Proposed criminal jury instructions Improper exhibition of dangerous weapons or firearms790.1010.5 b. (Defendant) entered or remained on (facility name) owned by (school name) . Give 2a or 2b as applicable. 2. a. (Defendant) did not have any legitimate business on the campus or any other authorization, license, or invitation to enter or remain upon school property; or b. (Defendant) was a student under suspension or expulsion at the time he or she entered or remained on the campus or any other facility owned by a school. No lesser included offenses have been identified for this instruction. Comment Definition “School” means the grounds or any facility of any kindergarten, elementary school, middle school, junior high school, or secondary school, whether public or non-public. Lesser Included Offenses No lesser included offenses have been identified for this offense. Comment This instruction was adopted in 2005. 13.5 (b) TRESPASS ON SCHOOL GROUNDS OR FACILITIES AFTER WARNING BY PRINCIPAL OR DESIGNEE § 810.097(2), Fla. Stat. To prove the crime of Trespass On School Grounds or Facilities After Warning Principal Or Designee, the State must prove the following two elements beyond a reasonable doubt: 1. (Defendant) entered or remained on the campus or any facility of (school name) ; and 2. The Principal or [his] [her] designee [told or directed the defendant to leave the campus or facility] [told the defendant not to enter the campus or facility] of (school name) . Definition “School” means the grounds or any facility of any kindergarten, elementary school, middle school, junior high school, or secondary school, whether public or non-public. Lesser Included Offenses No lesser included offenses have been identified for this offense. Comment This instruction was adopted in 2005. 14.2 DEALING IN STOLEN PROPERTY (FENCING) § 812.019(1), Fla. Stat. To prove the crime of (crime charged ) Dealing in Stolen Property (Fencing) , the State must prove the following two elements beyond a reasonable doubt: 1. (Defendant) [trafficked in] [endeavored to traffic in] (property alleged). 2. (Defendant) knew or should have known that (property alleged) was stolen. Inferences. Give if applicable. § 812.022(2), Fla. Stat. Proof of possession of recently stolen property, unless satisfactorily explained, gives rise to an inference that the person in possession of the property knew or should have known that the property had been stolen. Inferences. Give if applicable. § 812.022(3), Fla. Stat. Proof of the purchase or sale of stolen property at a price substantially below the fair market value, unless satisfactorily explained, gives rise to an inference that the person buying or selling the property knew or should have known that the property had been stolen. Inferences. Give if applicable. § 812.022(4), Fla. Stat. Proof of the purchase or sale of stolen property by a dealer in property, out of the regular course of business or without the usual indicia of ownership other than mere possession, unless satisfactorily explained, gives rise to an inference that the person buying or selling the property knew or should have known that it had been stolen. Inferences. Give if applicable. § 812.022(5), Fla. Stat. Proof that a dealer who regularly deals in used property possesses stolen property, upon which a name and phone number of a person other than the offeror of the property are conspicuously displayed, gives rise to an inference that the dealer possessing the property knew or should have known that the property was stolen. Definitions § 812.012(3), Fla.Stat. “Property” means anything of value, and includes: real property, including things growing on, affixed to and found in land; tangible or intangible personal property, including rights, privileges, interests, and claims; and services. §§ 812.012(6), 812.028(3), Fla. Stat. “Stolen property” means property that has been the subject of any criminally wrongful taking or if the property has not been stolen, that it was offered for sale to (defendant) as stolen property. § 812.012(7), Fla. Stat. “Traffic” means: to sell, transfer, distribute, dispense or otherwise dispose of property; and to buy, receive, possess, obtain control of or use property with the intent to sell, transfer, distribute, dispense or otherwise dispose of that property. Comment This instruction was adopted in 1981 and was amended in 1987 , and 1995 , and 2005 by adding 3(a) and 3(b pursuant to Glover v. State, 803 So. 2nd 236 (Fla. 2003). 11.14 VIDEO VOYEURISM § 810.145(2)(a – b), Fla. Stat. To prove the crime of Video Voyeurism, the State must prove the following four elements beyond a reasonable doubt: . Please mail your comments to The Honorable Terry D. Terrell, Chair of the Standard Jury Instructions Committee in Criminal Cases, c/o Mr. Les Garringer, Office of the General Counsel, Office of the State Courts Administrator, 500 S. Duval Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1900. The electronic copy must be e-filed to b. for the purpose of viewing the body of, or the undergarments worn by, that person, and Give 4a or 4b as applicable 4. a. Sells the image for consideration to another person. or Comment The lesser included offense of Felony Battery is only applicable if element 2a is charged and proved.This instruction was approved in 1981 and amended in 1989 , and 2005. 8.4(a) AGGRAVATED BATTERY ON PREGNANT WOMAN § 784.045, Fla. Stat. To prove the crime of Aggravated Battery On A Pregnant Woman, the State must prove the following three elements beyond a reasonable doubt. The first element is a definition of battery. 1. (Defendant) [intentionally touched or struck (victim) against her will] [intentionally caused bodily harm to (victim) ]. 2. (Victim) was pregnant at the time. 3. (Defendant) in committing the battery knew or should have known that (victim) was pregnant. Lesser Included Offenses or b. to secretly view, broadcast, or record under or through the clothing being worn by another person, without that person’s knowledge and consent, Definitions “Imaging device” means any mechanical, digital, or electronic viewing device, still camera, camcorder, motion picture camera, or any other instrument, equipment, or format capable of recording, storing, or transmitting visual images of another person. “Broadcast” means electronically transmitting a visual image with the intent that it be viewed by another person. “Privately exposing the body” means exposing a sexual organ. “A place and time when that person had a reasonable expectation of privacy” means a place and time when a reasonable person would believe that he or she could fully disrobe in privacy, without being concerned that the person’s undressing was being viewed, recorded, or broadcast by another, including, but not limited to, the interior of a bathroom, changing room, fitting room, dressing room, or tanning booth. § Section 810.145(5)(a- d), Fla. Stat. Give if applicable. The crime of video voyeurism does not apply to any: a. law enforcement agency conducting surveillance for a law enforcement purpose; b. security system, when a written notice is conspicuously posted on the premises stating that a video surveillance system has been installed for the purpose of security for the premises; c. video surveillance device installed in such a manner that the presence of the device is clearly and immediately obvious; or d. dissemination, distribution, or transfer of images by a provider of a electronic communication service. Lesser Included Offenses No lesser included offenses have been identified for this offense. Comment This instruction was adopted in 2005. 11.17 COMMERCIAL VIDEO VOYEURISM DISSEMINATION § 810.145(4), Fla. Stat. To prove the Crime of Commercial Video Voyeurism Dissemination, the State must prove the following four elements beyond a reasonable doubt. The (defendant) knew or had reason to believe, 1. that an image was created by using, installing or permitting the use or installation of an imaging device, Give 2a or 2b as applicable 2. a. to secretly view, broadcast, or record a person, without that person’s knowledge and consent, Definitions “Imaging device” means any mechanical, digital, or electronic viewing device, still camera, camcorder, motion picture camera, or any other instrument, equipment, or format capable of recording, storing, or transmitting visual images of another person. “Broadcast” means electronically transmitting a visual image with the intent that it be viewed by another person. “Privately exposing the body” means exposing a sexual organ. “A place and time when that person had a reasonable expectation of privacy” means a place and time when a reasonable person would believe that he or she could fully disrobe in privacy, without being concerned that the person’s undressing was being viewed, recorded, or broadcast by another, including, but not limited to, the interior of a bathroom, changing room, fitting room, dressing room, or tanning booth. § Section 810.145(5)(a – d). Give if applicable. The crime of video voyeurism does not apply to any: a. law enforcement agency conducting surveillance for a law enforcement purpose; b. security system, when a written notice is conspicuously posted on the premises stating that a video surveillance system has been installed for the purpose of security for the premises; c. video surveillance device installed in such a manner that the presence of the device is clearly and immediately obvious; or d. dissemination, distribution, or transfer of images by a provider of a electronic communication service. Lesser Included Offenses No lesser included offenses have been identified for this offense. Comment This instruction was adopted in 2005. 13.5 (a) TRESPASS ON SCHOOL GROUNDS OR FACILITIES § 810.097, Fla. Stat. To prove the crime of Trespass On School Grounds Or Facilities, the State must prove the following two elements beyond a reasonable doubt: 1. a. (Defendant) entered or remained on the campus of (school name) ; or Solicitation by person in familial authority794.011(8)(c)11.5 4. intentionally disseminated, distributed, or transferred the image to another person for the purpose of amusement, entertainment, sexual arousal, gratification, or profit, or for the purpose of degrading or abusing another person. This instruction was adopted in 1981 and amended in 1989 , and in 2005, by adding the Inferences in § 812.022(2)-(5), Fla. Stat. 14.3 DEALING IN STOLEN PROPERTY (ORGANIZING) § 812.019(2), Fla.Stat. To prove the crime of (crime charged) Dealing in Stolen Property (Organizing) , the State must prove the following two elements beyond a reasonable doubt: 1. (Defendant) [initiated] [organized] [planned] [financed] [directed] [managed] [supervised] the theft of (property alleged). 2. (Defendant) trafficked in the (property alleged) . Inferences. Give if applicable. § 812.022(2), Fla. Stat. Proof of possession of recently stolen property, unless satisfactorily explained, gives rise to an inference that the person in possession of the property knew or should have known that the property had been stolen. Inferences. Give if applicable. § 812.022(3), Fla. Stat. Proof of the purchase or sale of stolen property at a price substantially below the fair market value, unless satisfactorily explained, gives rise to an inference that the person buying or selling the property knew or should have known that the property had been stolen. Inferences. Give if applicable. § 812.022(4), Fla. Stat. Proof of the purchase or sale of stolen property by a dealer in property, out of the regular course of business or without the usual indicia of ownership other than mere possession, unless satisfactorily explained, gives rise to an inference that the person buying or selling the property knew or should have known that it had been stolen. Inferences. Give if applicable. § 812.022(5), Fla. Stat. Proof that a dealer who regularly deals in used property possesses stolen property, upon which a name and phone number of a person other than the offeror of the property are conspicuously displayed, gives rise to an inference that the dealer possessing the property knew or should have known that the property was stolen. Definitions § 812.012(3), Fla.Stat. “Property” means anything of value, and includes: real property, including things growing on, affixed to and found in land; tangible or intangible personal property, including rights, privileges, interests, and claims; and services. §§ 812.012(6), 812.028(3), Fla. Stat. “Stolen property” means property that has been the subject of any criminally wrongful taking or if the property has not been stolen, that it was offered for sale to (defendant) as stolen property. § 812.012(7), Fla. Stat. “Traffic” means: to sell, transfer, distribute, dispense or otherwise dispose of property; and to buy, receive, possess, obtain control of or use property with the intent to sell, transfer, distribute, dispense or otherwise dispose of that property. Comment SEXUAL BATTERY — VICTIM UNDER 12 — 794.011(2)(a)–(b) last_img read more

We’re ready: App-based ‘ojek’ drivers welcome ‘new normal’ with health measures

first_imgTopics : As Jakarta is likely to end its large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) on Thursday, app-based motorcycle taxi (ojek) services are embracing the so-called “new normal” by preparing health measures for transporting passengers. In accordance with Health Ministerial Decree No. 9/2020 on PSBB guidelines, Greater Jakarta administrations have since early April prohibited app-based ojek from transporting passengers. Such services, however, have been available for goods delivery.App-based ojek association Two-Wheel Movement Union (GARDA) said the drivers were ready to resume their services in the new normal. The association has even been campaigning for the use of a portable plastic partition to prevent direct contact between drivers and passengers on trips after the suspension is lifted. “We want to make both passengers and drivers comfortable,” the head of GARDA, Igun Wicaksono, said as quoted by kompas.com on Saturday. “The partition is made of flexible material so the driver can take it on and off easily,” he added.Read also: Experts slam govt for ‘inconsistent, poor’ COVID-19 policies after transport relaxationAccording to Igun, the plastic partition, which is easy to clean, would be carried like a backpack by drivers. The partition is equipped with a hand grip to avoid direct physical contact between driver and passenger. “It is our initiative. The government and app companies do not provide the tools. “As we produce the partition on our own, it will be made to order,” he said, indicating that drivers had to pay to own the partition.On Saturday, the Home Ministry issued a decree on guidelines for its civil servants working in the new normal phase, which drew criticism from the app-based ojek association.The decree suggests the Home Ministry’s civil servants be extra cautious in using public transportation, especially ojek, to avoid virus spread through shared helmets and direct contact between drivers and passengers, in the new normal. Ojek drivers were concerned that the decree meant that transporting passengers would remain prohibited in the new normal. The association had even planned to stage a protest for a revision to the decree in front of the Presidential Palace complex in Jakarta.In response, Home Ministry spokesperson Bahtiar Baharuddin said the decree meant no prohibition for ojek, adding that the ministry had no authority in regulating ojek services. “[The decree] was more like a suggestion for our civil servants to be really cautious in entering the productive and safe new normal […].“[We’re suggesting health measures] especially for those who are [about to use] app-based and conventional ojek because of the shared helmets,” said Bahtiar as quoted by kompas.com on Sunday, suggesting that civil servants wear their own helmets. (trn)last_img read more

Students’ study abroad preferences gradually shifting

first_imgIn the midst of study abroad week, which gives students a chance to explore the various available options for going abroad, the Office of Overseas Studies has noted recent changes in students’ choices of destination and in the majors of those choosing to travel.The number of students choosing to travel to Europe has remained steady, but the number of students going to South Africa to study has gone up 38 percent since spring 2009, according to the USC Office of Overseas Studies.“We are not exactly sure why,” said Veronica Gomez, the program assistant for Overseas Studies. “The only reason that we have thought of as to why it has increased is that students could be interested in seeing the World Cup.”Students not studying with the College of Letters, Arts & Sciences have also begun to study abroad more; the program saw a 54 percent increase in the number of Viterbi students going abroad through the Office of Overseas Studies this spring.“It’s because we have advertised that engineering students can get engineering credit through our program, and that is why we have seen an increase of engineering majors,” Gomez said. “The engineering school offers a study abroad program, but there are more options for them through our program.”Students who major in international relations still remain the most likely to study abroad through the Office of Overseas Studies.Other majors, including psychology, neuroscience and political science, have all seen significant jumps in the number of students choosing to study abroad. The Overseas Studies program credits this to the addition of the University London College option.Gisella de Morais, a junior majoring in international relations, decided to study abroad in Latin America this fall, choosing the region least often selected by USC students.Although it took a few classes to grasp the language, de Morais said she wanted to study in Brazil to reconnect with her family.“This experience completely changed me,” de Morais said. “I feel like a more complete person. Like I understand myself more, where I come from and that I have two cultures and homes in this world. “Shane Swerdlow, a senior majoring in policy, planning and development and business administration, chose to study abroad in Barcelona, hoping, he said, to gain a better grasp of the language.“I studied Spanish in high school, but it was weak when I arrived,” he said. “I took a two-week crash course through my abroad university, which was helpful, and my Spanish improved dramatically through forcing myself to speak in most situations. In Barcelona, most people speak Catalan before speaking Spanish, so I learned some Catalan phrases as well.”last_img read more