England v Australia Preview – Back England with eight point start!

first_imgHead-to-head: You’ve guessed it, the front-rows. Dan Cole has shown time and time again for Leicester that he can mix it with the best and the return of Andrew Sheridan has been a blessing in the same way that Ben Alexander’s comeback has been to the Wallabies.Previous results:2010: England won 21-20 in Sydney2010: Australia won 27-17 in Perth2009: Australia won 18-9 in London2008: Australia won 28-14 in London2007: England won 12-10 in Marseille (RWC)2006: Australia won 43-18 in Melbourne2006: Australia won 34-3 in Sydney2005: England won 26-16 in London2004: Australia won 21-19 in London2004: Australia won 51-15 in Brisbane2003: England won 20-17 in Sydney (RWC)Prediction: A tough one to call, but I can see David Pocock shining. Australia by 6!The teams: England: 15 Ben Foden, 14 Chris Ashton, 13 Mike Tindall, 12 Shontayne Hape, 11 Mark Cueto, 10 Toby Flood, 9 Ben Youngs, 8 Nick Easter, 7 Lewis Moody (capt), 6 Tom Croft, 5 Tom Palmer, 4 Courtney Lawes, 3 Dan Cole, 2 Dylan Hartley, 1 Andrew Sheridan.Replacements: 16 Steve Thompson, 17 David Wilson, 18 Simon Shaw, 19 Hendrie Fourie, 20 Danny Care, 21 Charlie Hodgson, 22 Delon Armitage.Australia: 15 Kurtley Beale, 14 James O’Connor, 13 Adam Ashley-Cooper, 12 Matt Giteau, 11 Drew Mitchell, 10 Quade Cooper, 9 Will Genia, 8 Ben McCalman, 7 David Pocock, 6 Rocky Elsom (capt), 5 Nathan Sharpe, 4 Mark Chisholm, 3 Ben Alexander, 2 Stephen Moore, 1 Benn Robinson.Replacements: 16 Huia Edmonds, 17 James Slipper, 18 Dean Mumm, 19 Richard Brown, 20 Luke Burgess, 21 Berrick Barnes, 22 Lachie Turner.Date: Saturday, November 13Venue: Twickenam, LondonKick-off: 14:30Referee: Craig Joubert (South Africa)Assistant referees: Christophe Berdos (France), Simon Mcdowell (Ireland) England manager Martin Johnson always laughs when a journalist asks him about ‘must win’ games. Well he would wouldn’t he as what coach would paint himself in a corner, admitting a match is must win. But this is the game that England must turn themselves into contenders, rather than nearly men. Once again in this fixture, the scrum becomes the pre-game focal point as Wales were the latest nation to get the better of Australia. But will that be enough to overcome Australia’s outrageously talented backs. It was in Sydney in the summer but not in Perth a week before.Most of the bookies give England a 3-4 point start which I think is fair on current form, apart from the outrageous Blue Square and 888 Sport who give England an 8-point start. My advice is to get on board here as that is too good to miss, following up on my tip last week to bet England with a 12-point start.Like Wales, England were also strong up front against their opening southern opponents, and that doesn’t bode well for the Wallabies. However, this week Martin Johnson has opted not to stick with the out-and-out bulk of Steve Thompson alongside Dan Cole and Andrew Sheridan, who all put in impressive set-piece performances against the All Blacks. Instead he rewards Dylan Hartley for his abrasive spell in the second-half. Some say he should be banned following an act on Richie McCaw…I leave to you to be the judge.Hartley is the only change to the starting line-up made by Johnson while lock Simon Shaw takes the place of Dave Attwood in the number 18 jersey. The Wallabies meanwhile have gone for all but one of the XV that escaped the Millennium Stadium with an efficient win.Then it was over to Welford Road on Tuesday with Robbie Deans admitting in the post-match he was impressed by that pack, but it cannot be downplayed just how the scrum could affect how things pan out on Saturday. We have witnessed in the past that English rugby’s HQ is buzzing when their eight is moving forward so Australia must step up to the plate if they are to allow Quade Cooper decent ball upon which to work his magic.Another man enjoying his rugby at present is Kurtley Beale. It seems strange to label it as a ‘second coming’ as he is still only 21, but the Waratahs full-back has found something he didn’t have when he was thrown into the mix for his franchise back in 2007. Pace to burn and an eye for what is going on around him nowadays, he has also attracted praise from his own team-mate Drew Mitchell who is loving Beale’s ‘instinctive’ mindset.Maybe he is the missing piece of the jigsaw for Australia, a squad that is developing into serious World Cup contenders ahead of next year. A further boost is a favourable draw as – going on form – they should avoid both New Zealand and South Africa until the big finale.England also cannot be written off in 2011 if we are to study recent improved performances – last week’s effort proving that June 19’s victory in Sydney was no fluke. Despite this, Australia go into Saturday’s game as favourites with the bookies and one would have to agree rightly so. But whether they can front up at scrum-time and go some way better than their humiliation in Cardiff is the aching doubt. We all know they have the answers wider out.The return of hooker Stephen Moore is the only change to the Qantas Wallabies’ squad to contest Saturday’s Cook Cup Test against England in London.The Australian rake was a last-minute withdrawal from last weekend’s 25-16 win over Wales in Cardiff, succumbing to a back complaint during the side’s warm-up.Moore’s naming reunites the front row that represented the Qantas Wallabies in the corresponding Test in 2009, with Moore (broken jaw), Ben Alexander (knee) and Benn Robinson (broken arm) ruled out of June’s two-Test series against England through injury.Huia Edmonds, who was a late inclusion into last week’s squad to face the Dragons, retains his place on the bench, with Saia Faingaa dropping out of the match day squad.Deans says Moore, who claimed man-of-the-match honours against England at Twickenham in 2008, will provide significant leadership within the squad for the Twickenham encounter.“Steve’s a 50 Test-plus player, so he brings with him a wealth of experience,” he said. “He’s played at Twickenham on a number of occasions – including last year, as has our starting front row.“We have 10 players returning from the corresponding fixture last year and that experience is invaluable. Twickenham’s a great venue to play; it’s the bastion of English rugby and they love to get behind their team and use the facility to their advantage, so the more guys that have played there the better.”In addition to their front row, the Qantas Wallabies feature another nine players who were involved in the 18-9 win over England at Twickenham last year including Adam Ashley-Cooper, Mark Chisholm, Quade Cooper, Rocky Elsom, Matt Giteau, Drew Mitchell, Dean Mumm, David Pocock and Will Genia, who not only crossed for a try in that fixture but was also named man of the match.Ashley-Cooper, who will move to within one cap of his 50th Test on Saturday, will again form a midfield partnership with Giteau, who scored all 20 of Australia’s points during the two sides’ last encounter in June, which England won 21-20 in Sydney.Having starred for the Qantas Wallabies against Wales, man of the match and fullback Kurtley Beale will combine with wingers Drew Mitchell and James O’Connor in the Australian back three.The retention of Edmonds leaves the Qantas Wallabies’ bench untouched from the one that fronted Wales at Millennium Stadium, including reserve forwards James Slipper, Dean Mumm and Richard Brown, and backs Luke Burgess, Berrick Barnes and Lachie Turner. The seven-man run-on reserves list – along with Giteau – make up the eight player contingent who will back up from the Qantas Wallabies’ 26-15 win over the Leicester Tigers at Welford Road on Tuesday night (Wednesday morning AEDT).Deans says last weekend’s match against Wales provided a strong foundation for his side to build upon.“We’ll be better off on a number of fronts,” he said. “Not only will several elements within our game have benefited, but we won’t have to travel halfway around the globe at the front end of the week and we’ll be better for that as well.“We’re under no illusions about what we’re up against this weekend. England played very well against New Zealand. They would have been hopeful for more out of that encounter in terms of the result, but they played some good rugby.“We believe this will be a step up for us based on what we witnessed in the English performance [against the All Blacks] last week, and it’s important that we make that step.”The Qantas Wallabies will endeavour to reach their 100-try milestone against England this weekend, having registered 99 touchdowns in 39 Tests between the two countries.Ones to watch: For England: Not long ago he insisted that his bad temper was well-and-truly behind him. But last Saturday’s antics proved that Dylan Hartley still has a job controlling himself. This week he gets a start and will be looking to get under the skin of his opponents. Australia may be the ones looking to get amongst him though and rightly so as if Hartley doesn’t keep his cool then South African official Craig Joubert might be reaching for his pocket.For Australia: I have already mentioned him. Kurtley Beale has made the number fifteen jersey his own over the past few months and possesses a step, pace and intelligence that saw Wales the latest to struggle with him. If he’s on his game then England are in trouble. Television match official: Jim Yuille (Scotland)center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Adam Jones talks scrums with Rugby World

first_imgWe were lucky enough to catch some of this on film and unlucky enough to experience what it is like to bind onto the big fella and scrum down. Here he is letting rip, and here we are looking scared…Read more from ‘Bomb’ as well as reading exclusive features with Geoff Parling, Simon Zebo and Chris Fusaro in November’s Heineken Cup special edition – out on Tuesday October 1st. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Gearing up for scrum time: Adam Jones shouts the odds on the pitch during the second Test of the Lions seriesBy Alan DymockFOR THE November issue of Rugby World we popped down to Neath to have a chat with Lions, Wales and Ospreys stalwart prop Adam Jones. He spoke about dealing with pain, his prospects of going to France and why he is a fashion icon. However, he also spoke at length about scrums and what he thinks of the new engagement rules.last_img read more

Tom Croft and Matt Smith: Ten seasons at Leicester Tigers

first_img“It’s a great club. The morals behind it, the culture that drives it are that it’s a close-knit environment. You work hard for success and then you enjoy that success together.”For more information, visit www.croftsmithtestimonial.co.uk or follow @croftsmithtest on Twitter Duo of the decade: Tom Croft and Matt Smith are celebrating a testimonial year with Leicester Tigers Credit: Getty Images Close friends and long-time colleagues, Tom Croft and Matt Smith reflect on their testimonial year at Leicester Tigers LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img “I don’t know whether Dad was coaching by then or whether he was playing. But that was always the big game of the season at Welford Road and we’d pack up Christmas to get over there. I must have been five or six.“Because my dad had been involved with the club, I felt that I had to prove my worth as a player. Especially when I first joined, I didn’t want just to be know as ‘Dosser’s kid’ – I wanted to make my own name, really.Winners, grinning: Smith and Croft with the 2009 Premiership trophy following a 10-9 win over London Irish“That was probably the most daunting thing. I was never star struck or in awe of people. It was a case of trying to prove my worth on a personal level.“When I was younger, all I wanted to do was play one game for Leicester. Then I wanted a 20-game tie, then I wanted 100 starts. Throughout my career, I’ve been motivated by that next milestone.”February 2013 and a 28-13 victory over London Welsh saw the Smiths become the first ever father-and-son duo to each make a century of Tigers starts.A couple of outings for the Saxons when Stuart Lancaster was in charge represent the closest Matt has come to England recognition. Even so, having been deployed in a variety of positions with Leicester, he is a hugely valued member of Richard Cockerill’s outfit.Thriving as part of the more ambitious approach of new attack guru Aaron Mauger – “he’s reminded the backs that our main job is to score tries rather than chase kicks” – and given a run of games at inside centre, Smith married sound decision-making and pinpoint distribution with uncomplicated physicality.In the run-up to the Six Nations before Manu Tuilagi returned to fitness, no Englishman wearing 12 was turning out better performances. A new two-year contract resulted and Smith will be at Welford Road until he is 32. As a mark of his popularity, he was presented with an award for outstanding service at this week’s end of season dinner.The owner of 41 England caps and five British and Irish Lions Tests over two tours, Croft has enjoyed more international accolades. However, his nightmare injury catalogue – a broken neck followed by ruptured knee ligaments and a dislocated shoulder – would have derailed lesser men.Thankfully, a disappointing 19-16 reverse to Racing 92 in the European Champions Cup semi-final on Sunday was Croft’s 26th appearance of the season. Cockerill admitted it was a gamble to offer Croft a new deal last April, but the dice-roll seems to have paid off.“In terms of personal form, I’m not quite back to where I need to be yet,” adds Croft, still a supreme lineout forward and an excellent athlete. “But it it’s going to take time and things are improving.“It was important, going into this year, to play a full season with the club. They supported me over the years I was injured and were within their rights to chop contracts. But they stuck with me.”Croft talks of the innate attitude bred at Tigers, one that encourages an insatiable appetite for silverware – “we’re close to the Premiership play-offs, but it’s one thing making them, another thing making the final and another thing winning it.”Try time: Smith dives over to score in the 33-20 defeat of Stade Francais in NovemberThe Leicester way is also humble, though. One charming anecdote says a great deal about Smith and Croft and how their friendship defines their club’s philosophy.When Croft received a late call-up to the Lions party in 2009 as a replacement for banned Munsterman Alan Quinlan, Smith had a cheeky request – more to stitch up his mate than anything else. He wanted Croft to send back a postcard, signed by Brian O’Driscoll. It never came, a 23 year-old Croft preferring to “keep his head down” on the tour of South Africa.Four years later, on the morning of Croft’s wedding, best man Smith was shown a video message by the groom. It was Ireland great O’Driscoll, speaking from the Sydney changing rooms in the aftermath of the Lions’ series win over the Wallabies, warning Smith not to crack during his speech.Croft grins widely on regaling that tale.“Our families are close now,” he says. “He’s godfather to my daughter, I’m godfather to his son, our wives get on very well. Leicester really is a family club, so bonds like that with him, with the Youngs brothers and others, form a real backbone.”Over ten years in professional sport, setbacks – non-selection, injuries, off-field issues – are inevitable. Resilience is a must. So where does that come from for these two?“It’s just love for the club,” Croft finishes. “Smithy will have personal reasons. His dad is a foundation stone of Tigers and Smithy will want to emulate that as a through-and-through Leicester player.“Myself? I just want to play for Leicester Tigers. From quite early on, I had that desire to see out my career at Leicester. I’ve admired players like Geordan Murphy who played for 14 or 15 years at one club. That’s been my aim since I was in my mid-20s and it still is now. “We pulled up and this gangly-looking, stick-like figure was stood there,” Matt Smith smiles, reminiscing.“We couldn’t believe he was getting such special treatment, that this was the new superstar we’d heard about.“I remember slightly resenting the fact that we’d even had to get off the motorway to pick him up.”How many prosperous relationships start off with quizzical looks at a service station? Does anyone even keep track?Almost 14 years after their roadside rendezvous, centre Smith and Tom Croft are celebrating a joint-testimonial for a decade of service with Leicester Tigers.Six domestic trophies punctuate their glittering Welford Road careers, encompassing a combined total of 352 first team appearances.But the story – and the success – begins in the summer of 2002 when Croft, joining Oakham School’s sixth form, met up with the pre-season trip to Devon.“Mum and dad drove me down to a service station on the M4 where I was to meet the Oakham minibuses,” explains Croft, racking his brains.“I jumped on and I was a bit of a rabbit in the headlights, really. I didn’t know anyone at all and I was very, very quiet for the whole trip down, possibly trying to learn a few names.“Eventually we got to Plymouth High School. The captain at the time was Joe Wheeler [an openside flanker and son of Tigers CEO Peter]. He and another couple of guys from the year above flooded their bathroom. They got in trouble and told the coaches it was me.Fresh face: Tom Croft in action against Gloucester in 2005, escaping the attentions of Ludovic Mercier“It was all a whirlwind. Fortunately, being part of the first team gave me a footing to make a few friends straightaway. I knew I just had to get stuck in.”Croft’s diligence helped him deliver. Oakham defended their Daily Mail Cup crown in the spring of 2003, overturning a Barnard Castle outfit featuring future Leicester colleague Mathew Tait in a thrilling Twickenham final. Wheeler landed a hat-trick in a 30-28 triumph.“When you’re playing big games, you want to be stood next to someone you trust,” continues Smith, who added another try in that game.“We know each other inside out. We know one another’s deepest, darkest secrets.“That trust was probably earned in those big games at Oakham and we lean on those days. When you’re 17 or 18, if those games aren’t your whole world, they’re pretty close.”Outside of school, the friends progressed through Leicester’s Academy system. An abrasive, uncompromising training environment and proximity to some of England’s premier players impressed the club’s distinctive philosophy – a single-minded, spiky competitiveness – pretty quickly.“I was walking down the corridor at the old training building once,” Croft says. “Everything eclipsed and went dark. I looked up and it was Martin Johnson. I was 15 at the time.“We used to go down to Oval Park every Tuesday and Thursday evening and you’d catch the senior guys leaving the training ground after a long day – Ben Kay, Martin Corry, Neil Back. You’d look at them in awe. It was exceptionally surreal.“In my last year at Oakham, England won the World Cup. Then straight out of school I went straight into professional rugby and I was training alongside them.“They were your teammates, but you’re in awe of them, what they’ve achieved and what they do.”Although his experiences were similar, Smith’s perspective was slightly different. Arriving as a versatile back, he was also spurred by added motivation.Ian Smith, affectionately known by nickname ‘Dosser’, is a prominent part of the club’s rich fabric. As an immensely industrious, tough flanker, he amassed 331 Tigers appearances between 1977 and 1991. Before taking over rugby at Oakham School, he coached Leicester for a stint too.“My earliest memory was that the club used to play the Barbarians on Boxing Day,” Matt goes on.last_img read more

Get ‘Inside the Lions’ with the new issue of Rugby World

first_imgMeet and greet: Warren Gatland mingles with Lions fans in Wellington. Photo: Getty ImagesVinny Hammond – Pressure, playing with Johnny Sexton and speaking ‘Wiganese’ all come up in conversation with the Lions analystKyle Sinckler – The prop’s thirst for knowledge means he has been thriving on this tourDwayne Sweeney – The NZ Provincial Barbarians centre relished his chance to face the LionsFOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREGerard Carmody – It takes two years of planning to put together a Lions tour, as the director of operations explainsWhat next for the Lions? – We look at what the future holds for the touring team and what must changePLUS, ALL THIS INSIDEThe Pacific Islands ­– Columnist Stephen Jones gives his verdict on the problems facing Fiji, Samoa and Tonga in the professional era while Ben Ryan gives an insight into his time as Fiji’s sevens coachTours review – A look at the success of England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales in their June Tests, including the ‘find’ of each tourOn the ball: Hamish Watson in action during Scotland’s triumph in Oz. Photo: Getty ImagesHamish Watson – The Scotland flanker on that famous win over AustraliaProfessional advice – Lions kicking coach Neil Jenkins gives his top tips for managing different kickers while former Bath lock Stuart Hooper explains how to score off a lineout driveJames Lowe – The soon-to-be Leinster wing talks about his struggle with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis TAGS: Highlight The Rugby World team bring you exclusive behind-the-scenes access from the British & Irish Lions tour of New Zealand in the new issue. Not only do we speak to players and coaches but we also meet the unsung heroes who make the Lions tick off the field and chat to their opponents too. Here’s a detailed look at the Lions coverage and what else is in the August edition…INSIDE THE LIONSMaro Itoje – The Lions lock talks politics, religion and emotional wellbeingRed alert: Maro Itoje has stood out for the Lions in New Zealand. Photo: Getty ImagesLions fans – Meet the couple returning to New Zealand to celebrate their wedding anniversary, 12 years after tying the knot during the 2005 Lions tourPaul Stridgeon – The head of strength and conditioning discusses his training techniques, and admits to having a fear of horses!Andy Farrell – How do you develop a defence designed to stop the All Blacks in just a few weeks? The coach explains allPaddy O’Reilly – Meet the kit man known for keeping the Lions’ spirits upConor Murray – The scrum-half has mastered the box-kick and tells RW why it’s so successfulBoot it! Conor Murray puts up a box-kick against the All Blacks. Photo: Getty ImagesEanna Falvey – Discover the unique challenges that being the Lions doctor entailsPhil Pask – A day in the life of a Lions physioKen Owens – We find out more about the personal band of supporters following the hooker around New ZealandOwen Franks – The All Blacks prop on family ties and celebrating triesWarren Gatland – The Lions coach gives us the inside track on photos from throughout his career in his ‘life in pictures’ LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img In the August issue of Rugby World we go behind the scenes on the Lions tour of New Zealand Women’s rugby – Test centurion Tamara Taylor talks about her life in rugby, Sarah Hunter provides a few insights into her personality and we report on England’s first win over the Black Ferns in New Zealand since 2001Scott Robertson – The Crusaders coach on dancing, dream dinner guests and Dagg the jokerlast_img read more

Chaplains for schools in Hong Kong to be trained in…

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Chaplains for schools in Hong Kong to be trained in Wales Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Posted Sep 26, 2012 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY Theological Education Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [Church in Wales] The Centre for Chaplaincy Studies in Cardiff, Wales, has been chosen to train chaplains for more than 150 church schools in Hong Kong.The center is part of St. Michael’s Theological College and Cardiff University, both of which have signed a partnership agreement with SKH Ming Hua Theological College in Hong Kong to develop chaplaincy training. The Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui (Anglican Church in Hong Kong) is working towards appointing a chaplain in every church school.The Rev. Canon Andrew Todd, director of the Cardiff-based center, recently welcomed the first students from Hong Kong, who have registered on the Cardiff Master of Theology in Chaplaincy Studies program.“It is fantastic to see this link develop, which will bring together chaplains from Hong Kong, the U.K. and elsewhere,” he said. “This will enrich the learning of all concerned and develop our understanding of chaplaincy as a global phenomenon.”The contract reinforces the growing international reputation of the center, said the principal of St. Michael’s College, the Rev. Canon Peter Sedgwick.“This is a very exciting new partnership which will enable us to take our wide experience and expertise in chaplaincy across the world,” he said. “It is good to see the two provincial theological colleges working so well together. I look forward to even greater collaboration in the future.”Students will travel to Cardiff to study a number of times each year, but it is expected that courses will also be developed in Hong Kong by center and Ming Hua staff working together.Gareth Jones, theological consultant to Hong Kong Archbishop Paul Kwong and dean of Ming Hua, said, “Chaplaincy is a key part of Archbishop Paul’s vision for ministry in the Province of Hong Kong, and the Cardiff Masters program provides the perfect foundation for our future work in this field. We feel there’s a real meeting of hearts and minds between St. Michael’s and our Ming Hua College, in this and other areas, and we are very excited about what we will achieve together.”Professor Terry Threadgold, head of the School of History, Archaeology and Religion, and pro-vice chancellor of Cardiff University, said, “The university is delighted at the start of this new chapter in education for chaplains wishing to enhance their skills through the Cardiff Centre for Chaplaincy Studies. The partnership will not only offer SKH Ming Hua Theological College, Hong Kong students the chance to participate in the proven and respected M.Th. in Chaplaincy Studies, but also establish a further link between the university and Hong Kong.”For more information about Cardiff Centre for Chaplaincy Studies, visithttp://www.stmichaels.ac.uk/chaplaincy-studies.php Associate Rector Columbus, GA Asia, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ center_img Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion, Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listinglast_img read more

Three years later Haitians are eager to move beyond the…

first_imgThree years later Haitians are eager to move beyond the tent cities The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bruce Green says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET January 14, 2013 at 5:29 pm Most of the money that was sent was used for emergency food, medical care, and tent housing. Check any reliable charity, such as Episcopal Relief and Development (www.er-d.org.) They report exactly what they spend and where.A lot of money that was promised was never sent, and some of the “instant” fly-by-night charities that were set up didn’t actually do anything.The United States government gave money but used most of it to pay itself back for the cost of sending in the army to get the airport going, sending the USS Comfort, etc.Money collected by Partners in Health (www.pih.org) not used for emergency medical aid went to build a terrific new teaching hospital which will not only provide medical care and training but many local jobs, and already provided hundreds of jobs during its construction.Many good things are happening, but there’s a tremendous amount more to do. Support any reputable charity, and thank you! Comments are closed. Comments (3) Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Children play in a slum in Port-au-Prince, Haiti in late December. Many Haitians are still living in tent cities three years are a major earthquake devastated the capital but, there are signs for progress. Photo/Swoan Parker, Reuters[Episcopal News Service] In minutes, Haiti was forever changed when the 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck on January 12, 2010. Three years later, the devastation is often more visible than the progress that has been made. Nearly 300,000 people lost their lives, hundreds of thousands were injured and the property loss is inconceivable. All of the major institutions in Port-au-Prince were destroyed or damaged, including the National Palace, historic art treasures and Holy Trinity Cathedral, the Episcopal Church’s national cathedral that was constructed in 1929.Haiti was not without its challenges before the earthquake. Considered the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, the country suffers from unemployment, extreme poverty and lack of access to basic needs – education, healthcare and food. Add a devastating earthquake to this mix, and the challenges for Haiti seem so overwhelming.And yet whenever we visit Haiti, we are constantly reminded of the spirit of our brothers and sisters in Haiti and their faith that gives them hope. When visiting Haiti, we often join in worship on Sunday mornings. Recently, we worshipped with St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Mirebalais on Sunday morning. It was warm and worship began at 8:30 am and lasted over three hours. Worship was filled with heartfelt prayers, choirs of all ages, filling the church with music, a moving sermon and Holy Communion. God was so present in our time together. This faith, this deep conviction is what continues to fill Haitians with hope for a new day.And now, three years later, there are signs of progress. The reality on the ground is that much has been and is being done. There are new roads connecting communities. Schools have been open in all kinds of structures and new ones are under construction. Health care continues to benefit from Partners in Health’s efforts and a new state of the art 320-bed teaching hospital just opened in Mirebalais located less than 30 miles from Port-au-Prince.But while there are beginning to be small signs of progress, the work has really just begun. The Episcopal Church in Haiti has a long history of mission. For over 150 years, it has been a leader in education and health services in Haiti. Over 80,000 children receive education and training from the schools associated with the Episcopal Church.  The Episcopal Church has also been a leading provider of health care for Haitians, as it runs three major hospitals and a network of health clinics throughout the country. The Episcopal Church has been working to support its partners in Haiti, and through Episcopal Relief & Development, we are responding to immediate needs for clean water, temporary housing and employment.As important as responding to these needs for Haitians, so too is the need to support the spiritual and cultural institution of Haitians. Holy Trinity Cathedral is one of these institutions. It was a primary gathering place for Haitians. Institutions affiliated with the cathedral included a primary and secondary school, a convent and a music school which housed the country’s only philharmonic orchestra. Holy Trinity Cathedral had housed what was believed to be the largest organ in the Caribbean and the murals throughout the cathedral depicted biblical stories in Haitian motifs. They were created by some of Haiti’s most famous artists in the 1950s.After the earthquake, rebuilding this institution was of significant importance to Haitians of all faiths. And the Episcopal Church committed itself to supporting this effort. Recently, the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Haiti announced the selection of Kerns Group Architects of Arlington, Virginia, as the architect selected to design the new cathedral. The new cathedral will incorporate the three surviving murals.Haitians are eager to move beyond the tent cities that have stayed far too long. They are eager to rebuild their country through sustainable ways. And as much as we need to provide access to clean water and food, we also need to continue to look beyond the immediate horizon to more permanent development in Haiti.For Haiti, it will take years to recover from both the emotional and physical turmoil of the earthquake.  But today, as we reflect on the last three years, we give God thanks for the endurance and resilience of the people of Haiti. We are inspired by their ability to be spirit filled despite the daily challenges.The Rev. Joseph Murrenz Constant, a Haitian American, and the Rev. Dr. Rosemari G. Sullivan serve as special coordinators for the work of the Episcopal Church in Haiti. They facilitate the multiple efforts among Episcopal congregations, dioceses, networks and organizations committed to the rebuilding of the Diocese of Haiti. Constant is also the director of ethnic ministries and student life at Virginia Theological Seminary. Prior to her work in Haiti, Sullivan served as secretary of the General Convention and as rector of congregations in Washington, D.C. and Alexandria, Virginia.center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Haiti Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Serena Beeks says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Marylin Day says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC January 14, 2013 at 6:49 pm Is ERD holding the funds or Episcopal Foundation? Can they give us the status of the funds collected? Thanks… Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS January 14, 2013 at 5:01 pm What happened to the money that was collected for them?give us some accounting. Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY By Joseph Murrenz Constant and Rosemari G. SullivanPosted Jan 14, 2013 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

Sin precedente el número de niños detenidos al cruzar la…

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Por Lynette Wilson Posted Jul 21, 2014 Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inmigrantes de Centroamérica llegan al centro local de refugiados en McAllen. Uno de ellos lleva información de donde viven varios de sus parientes en Estados Unidos. Foto de Trish Motheral.[Episcopal News Service] Dieciséis muchachos con edades de entre 14 y 17 años se reunieron el 6 de julio en torno a un mapa de América en el que fijaron notas adhesivas con sus nombres de pila junto a sus países de origen. La mayoría de las notas fueron a dar a Guatemala, seguida por Honduras.Entonces, la Rda. Susan Copley les pidió a los adolescentes que pusieran las notas junto al lugar al que se dirigían. Algunos dijeron que se quedarían con parientes en Nueva York; otros se dirigían a Texas, Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Maryland y California.Un mes antes, el 5 de enero, Copley y algunos voluntarios de su iglesia comenzaron a visitar a los menores no acompañados en Abbott House, una agencia de servicios regional de carácter comunitario que tiene su sede central en Irvington, Nueva York, un pequeño pueblo del valle del río Hudson, justo al sur de Tarrytown, donde Copley es el rector de la iglesia de Cristo y la misión de San Marcos [Christ Church and San Marcos Mission].Además de llevar a cabo visitas semanales, donde juegan deportes con los chicos y celebran una eucaristía abreviada en español, los miembros de la iglesia oran por los niños y se movilizan para apoyarlos. En una tarde, sus congregaciones de habla inglesa y española recaudaron $1.000 para comprar zapatos para los niños, algunos de los cuales llegaron descalzos a Abbott House.No se trata sólo de proporcionarles a los niños “un contacto positivo con las personas que se ocupan de ellos”, invitando a diferentes miembros de la iglesia de Cristo y de la comunidad de San Marcos, lo cual contribuye a contrapesar algo de la negatividad que acompaña sus relatos, dijo Copley.Desde principios de junio, las cifras récord de menores de edad no acompañados que han cruzado la frontera suroccidental [de Estados Unidos] fundamentalmente de Guatemala, Honduras y El Salvador— y la crisis humanitaria que se les asocia ha estado en las noticias, en las cuales los políticos han estado sorteándose la culpa, y los que protestan haciendo titulares.Con excepción de los menores no acompañados provenientes de México y Canadá, que pueden ser devueltos inmediatamente a sus países de origen conforme a la ley de inmigración de EE.UU. de 2008, los menores que llegan solos deben ser detenidos por las autoridades estadounidenses y sujetos a una vista de deportación, que puede tomar años. Un menor no acompañado es por definición una persona menor de 18 años de edad que está separada de ambos padres y no se encuentra al cuidado de un tutor ni de ningún otro adulto.Para ajustarse al influjo de menores inmigrantes, el gobierno ha improvisado albergues en bases militares y ha contratado hogares de tránsito, como Abbott House, donde los menores pueden ser atendidos antes de entregárselos a un pariente, con quién estarían hasta el momento de la vista de inmigración.Abbott House les brinda a los menores que llegan solos cama y comida, asesoría de caso, consejería individual, servicios médicos y educativos, recreación y actividades de esparcimiento, aculturación, servicios legales, transporte y acceso a servicios religiosos antes de ubicarlos con familiares o en acogida temporal, según un comunicado de prensa del 4 de junio.Las iglesias acuden a la fronteraEn un llamado del pasado 3 de julio a la Diócesis de Texas Occidental, el obispo Gary Lillibridge describió las necesidades humanitarias de su diócesis, particularmente en las poblaciones fronterizas de McAllen y Laredo.La iglesia episcopal de San Juan [St. John’s Episcopal Church] en McAllen, con la colaboración de Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales, se ha incorporado a una campaña mayor, la Comunidad de Fe de McAllen para la Recuperación de Desastres, un grupo de agencias eclesiásticas y gubernamentales que se han asociado para responder a crisis, mediante la ayuda  con comidas y lavado de ropa para individuos y familias albergados en la iglesia católica del Sagrado Corazón [Sacred Heart Catholic Church] o en tiendas levantadas en su entorno.San Juan comenzó preparando mochilas con artículos de higiene personal, tales como jabones, champús y acondicionadores tamaño de viaje, un peine, un cepillo de dientes y otros artículos, así como paquetes de suplementos nutritivos, tales como galletitas de mantequilla de maní y barras de cereal.“Organizamos ‘grupos de embalaje’ en la iglesia todos los domingos y miércoles y juntamos tantos paquetes como podemos, y embalamos esos paquetes según se necesitan”, dijo la Rda. Nancy Springer, auxiliar del rector en San Juan.Empeños semejantes están teniendo lugar en Laredo, donde los feligreses de la iglesia de Cristo [Christ Church] preparan mochilas que también contienen artículos de higiene personal y nutricionales, para entregárselos a los niños y sus familiares que acuden a su ciudad.Y en Arizona, donde se dijo que mujeres y niños se bajaban en las estaciones de autobuses de Tucson y Phoenix, la Iglesia también se ha sumado a los empeños interreligiosos.Sin embargo, la crisis en el triángulo norte de América Central no sólo concierne a los niños, sino a los adultos y a las familias también. En las últimas semanas, decenas de miles de mujeres con niños y otros núcleos  familiares que huyen de la violencia en Guatemala, El Salvador y Honduras han llegado a Texas y Arizona, según explica una reciente actualización de la defensa de la inmigración  de la Red Episcopal de Política Pública: “Cuando las mujeres y los niños huyen de sus hogares en estas cifras ello indica una crisis humanitaria, no una amenaza a la seguridad”, dijo Katie Conway, analista de inmigración y refugiados de la Iglesia Episcopal. “Los episcopales a través del país han respondido a la crisis con compasión y amoroso servicio y llamamos al Presidente y al Congreso a hacer lo mismo. Creemos que Estados Unidos es capaz de hacerle frente a este desafío sin comprometer nuestros valores o nuestra seguridad, y sin darles la espalda a madres e hijos vulnerables que buscan paz y protección”.(El 25 de junio, Conway y Alexander Baumgarten, director de la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales de la Iglesia Episcopal con sede en Washington, D.C. presentó un testimonio ante el Congreso respecto a la crisis en nombre de la Iglesia.En marzo, el Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados (ACNUR), expresó su preocupación por el creciente número de niños que cruzaban la frontera “empujados por la violencia, la inseguridad y el abuso en sus comunidades y en sus hogares” y pidió a los organismos gubernamentales “que tomaran medidas para mantener a los menores de edad a salvo de abusos de derechos humanos, violencia y delitos, y para garantizarles su acceso al asilo y a otras formas de protección internacional”.El ACNUR fundamenta su preocupación y su llamado a la acción en un informe de 120 páginas titulado Niños en fuga, que se basa en entrevistas con más de 400 menores no acompañados provenientes de Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras y México que se encuentran bajo detención federal. El informe indica que muchos de los niños creían que corrían peligro en sus países de origen y que serían seleccionados por las autoridades que evaluarían sus necesidades de protección internacional sobre la marcha.El informe dice también que muchos de los jóvenes entrevistados eran parte de movimientos de una  “migración mixta”, que incluye tanto a individuos necesitados de protección internacional como a migrantes en busca de trabajo.“Es de suma importancia advertir que la vasta mayoría de estos niños pueden ser en verdad solicitantes de asilo”, dijo Deb Stein, director del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración. “Hablar de deportarlos a las mismas circunstancias terribles de las que huyeron por seguridad sin la oportunidad de buscar protección es ignorar sus derechos conforme a la Convención de los Refugiados de la ONU de 1951, de la cual EE.UU. es signatario. Esto se pierde en la acalorada retórica de deportarlos simplemente porque entraron ilegalmente al país, cuando en efecto no es ilegal solicitar asilo”.A partir de octubre de 2011, el gobierno de EE.UU. comenzó a advertir un aumento dramático del número de menores no acompañados provenientes de El Salvador, Guatemala y Honduras, el cual para el año fiscal 2013 había aumentado de 4.059 a 21.573. Para el 15 de junio de 2014, el número había llegado a 51.279 para este año fiscal. Desde 2009, el ACNUR ha registrado un aumento en las solicitudes de asilo [de personas] provenientes de esos mismos tres países. ElMinisterio Episcopal de Migración,  el Ministerio de Justicia y Defensa Social de la Iglesia Episcopal Episcopal y Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales están trabajando juntos para conectar a los episcopales interesados en crear o compartir información, recursos y ayuda mutua para la promoción y el ministerio de la inmigración.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Laura Shaver, encargada de comunicaciones de la Diócesis de Texas Occidental, colaboró con esta información.Traducción de Vicente Echerri The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Sin precedente el número de niños detenidos al cruzar la frontera La Iglesia responde a la crisis humanitaria Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Urgentes llamados a la paz en la tierra del Único…

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Urgentes llamados a la paz en la tierra del Único Santo Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Personal medico en el hospital Ahli Arab en Gaza reciben a un paciente en la institución dirigida por la Diócesis Episcopal de Jerusalén.[Episcopal News Service] Líderes religiosos y políticos han redoblado sus demandas de un permanente cese al fuego al conflicto de tres semanas de duración entre Israel y Hamás, en el que el número de bajas asciende 7.000, y las víctimas mortales llegaban [el miércoles 30] a 1.200.“La continua e intensificada violencia en la tierra del Único Santo, la matanza de inocentes por acciones de ambas partes, y la rigidez y ausencia de un verdadero liderazgo político está haciendo llorar al mundo”, escribió la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori en una declaración que envió por correo electrónico a ENS. “Dios también llora, mientras el hermano mata al hermano. ¿Permitiremos que Caín y Abel representen su acto breve y belicoso, o exigiremos un fin de esta depravación? Nadie vivirá en paz en el Oriente Medio —ni en el mundo— mientras esta carnicería prosiga. Oren por la paz, alberguen al inocente, apoyen toda respuesta humanitaria e insistan en que se ponga fin a esta inhumanidad”.Desde que su Operación Borde Protector comenzara el 8 de julio, Israel ha intensificado el bombardeo de Gaza en respuesta a las acciones de Hamás, el movimiento de militantes islámicos que controla Gaza y continúa lanzando misiles contra Israel. Varios intentos de llegar a un cese al fuego han fracasado.El 29 de julio, la única planta eléctrica de Gaza resultó destruida mientras Israel atacaba blancos vinculados a Hamás. Entre tanto, Israel sigue interceptando misiles sobre las regiones sur y central del país. Cincuenta y tres soldados israelíes y más de 1.200 palestinos, la mayoría civiles, han muerto en el conflicto.“Al igual que tantos episcopales y otras personas que han estado en estrecho contacto con el gobierno de EE.UU. a través de estas últimas semanas tenebrosas, me siento agradecido del justo y determinado liderazgo del secretario de Estado John Kerry y de otros líderes mundiales para lograr un cese al fuego, pero profundamente frustrado de que esos empeños no hayan dado hasta ahora ningún fruto significativo”, dijo a Episcopal News Service Alexander Baumgarten, el director de relaciones gubernamentales de la Iglesia Episcopal.“Lo más importante que los episcopales pueden hacer en el momento es lo que muchos han estado haciendo: orar sin cesar, apoyar los ministerios de la Diócesis de Jerusalén en Gaza y en cualquier parte y retar a nuestros líderes políticos a que exijan la paz y se muestren solidarios tanto con los israelíes como con los palestinos que anhelan la paz y están pagando el inimaginable costo de continuar la guerra”, añadió. “Si viene, y cuando venga, un cese al fuego, la obra de los pacificadores será tan urgente como siempre, y una paz justa y duradera sólo puede lograrse a través de una solución negociada entre israelíes y palestinos que ofrezca dos estados seguros y viables para dos pueblos”.El Rdo. Canónigo John Organ, hablando por teléfono desde Jerusalén Oriental, donde sirve de capellán al obispo anglicano en Jerusalén Suheil Dawani, conviene en que el camino a la paz es a través de una solución de dos estados, un objetivo que la Iglesia Episcopal y muchas de las provincias de la Comunión Anglicana han apoyado durante mucho tiempo.“No ayuda el estar a favor de éste y en contra del otro”, dijo Organ. “Debemos ser pro israelíes y pro palestinos. No tenemos que tomar partido. Pero sí tenemos que estar a favor de la justicia y en contra de esta ocupación”.El arzobispo de Cantórbery, Justin Welby, en una declaración el 29 de julio, dijo que “sólo una costosa y franca búsqueda de la paz entre israelíes y palestinos puede proteger a las personas inocentes, a sus hijos y a sus nietos, de una violencia que cada vez será peor… Debemos clamarle a Dios y golpear las puertas del cielo y orar por la paz y la justicia y la seguridad”.En Gaza, el hospital Ahli Arab, una institución de la Diócesis Episcopal de Jerusalén, ha seguido, a pesar de todas las adversidades, ofreciendo atención médica de emergencia para muchos de los heridos, mientras su personal trabaja sin parar, poniendo sus propias vidas en peligro para el bien de otros.Organ, que habla diariamente con Suheila Tarazi, la directora del hospital, dijo que el 29 de julio gran parte del personal no pudo llegar al hospital porque resultaba demasiado peligroso para ellos viajar desde sus casas, pero que hoy ya esas personas se encuentra en las instalaciones y les han aconsejado que no salgan. “El hospital está trabajando a plena capacidad y sin parar, admitiendo nuevos pacientes mientras sea posible hacerlo”, explicó.A través del apoyo de la Diócesis Episcopal de Jerusalén y de varios asociados, el hospital recibió el 29 de julio 5.000 litros de combustible para su generador, un recurso de importancia capital para el funcionamiento de equipo médico de salvamento, especialmente después de la destrucción de la planta eléctrica.El obispo Barry Howe de Misurí Occidental, dijo que a través del hospital “la Iglesia Episcopal estaba allí para ofrecer curación y el abrazo de la compasión a todos los hijos de Dios”.Howe, como presidente de la junta administrativa de los Amigos Americanos de la Diócesis Episcopal de Jerusalén, (AFEDJ, por su sigla en inglés) dijo que, “nos sentimos muy agradecidos por la desbordada muestra de apoyo en este momento crítico. El 100% de cada donación se dedica a los que sufren y a apoyar a las personas que se ocupan de sus necesidades”.En su boletín del 29 de julio, los AFEDJ reportaron que una parte del muro exterior del hospital había sido destruida y que la principal línea de vapor del hospital había resultado averiada, lo cual significa que ahora no hay agua caliente. Al parecer, grandes trozos de metralla han alcanzado habitaciones de pacientes y el lavadero.“Hay una necesidad inmediata de reparaciones para garantizar la seguridad de los pacientes”, decía el boletín.“El Hospital Al Ahli se ha convertido en un refugio de familias que están sufriendo, que se encuentran sin hogar y que tienen miedo”, dijo Anne Lynn, presidente de AFEDJ, en un correo electrónico a ENS. “Los médicos, las enfermeras y el personal de apoyo en el Hospital Al Ahli, pese al cansancio y al temor, pese a las condiciones deplorables y a los apagones crónicos, siguen ofreciendo atención compasiva a todos y cada uno de los pacientes. Ellos merecen, y tienen, nuestro respeto, nuestras oraciones y nuestro apoyo.Welby expresó su “mayor admiración” por todos los que participan en los empeños humanitarios sobre el terreno en Gaza, “en particular el equipo médico y el personal del Hospital Al Ahli Arab. Proporcionar alivio y amparo a esos desplazados es una expresión tangible de nuestro cuidado e interés, e insto a todas las parroquias y la diócesis de la Iglesia de Inglaterra, así como de la Comunión [Anglicana] en general, a orar por ellos y a respaldar el llamamiento de urgencia de la Diócesis de Jerusalén”.La Diócesis Episcopal de Jerusalén lanzó un llamamiento de urgencia para el hospital el 14 de julio, en tanto Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales alentaba un constante apoyo a través de su Fondo del Oriente Medio.Welby dijo: “Si bien la ayuda humanitaria para esos civiles más afectados es una prioridad, especialmente las mujeres y los niños, debemos reconocer también que este conflicto subraya la importancia de renovar un compromiso con el diálogo político en una amplia búsqueda de paz y seguridad, tanto para Israel como para los palestinos. El ciclo destructivo de la violencia ha causado un sufrimiento inenarrable y amenaza la seguridad de todos”.Jerusalén, a unos 80 kilómetros de la franja de Gaza, ha sido un lugar muy diferente —lleno de la tensión del miedo— desde que comenzó la ofensiva, dijo Organ a ENS.A fines de la semana pasada, Organ regresaba conduciendo a Jerusalén a través de Cisjordania y, justo antes de llegar a Nablus, se encontró con una manifestación de protesta por el conflicto. “Luego, de repente, hubo disparos y varios palestinos murieron. Tuvimos que conducir a través de los incendios y de los escombros”, señaló. “De manera que estamos rodeados por esto. La pérdida de vidas de ambas partes es trágica”.Además de dirigirse a los militantes de Hamás, los ataques aéreos israelíes han intentado destruir una red de túneles que entran y salen de Gaza, zona a la que Israel y Egipto le han impuesto un bloqueo desde 2007. El gobierno israelí dice que no detendrá la ofensiva hasta que los túneles sean destruidos y Hamás ha dicho que no dejará de lanzar misiles a Israel hasta que termine el bloqueo.A principios de esta semana, el primer ministro israelí Benjamin Netanyahu prometía una larga campaña en Gaza, diciendo que la región tenía que desmilitarizarse a fin de proteger a Israel. “No terminaremos la operación en Gaza sin neutralizar los túneles del terror, que tienen el solo propósito de destruir a nuestros ciudadanos, de matar a nuestros hijos”, afirmó.Entre tanto, la Agencia de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados de Palestina informó que algunos miembros de su personal habían sido muertos y que la ONU tiene actualmente a su cuidado a 182.604 palestinos en sus 82 albergues en Gaza.La Operación Borde Protector de Israel comenzó luego de una intensificación de los ataques de misiles de los militantes. La violencia estalló después del secuestro y asesinato de tres adolescentes israelíes y del subsecuente secuestro y asesinato de un muchacho palestino en represalia.El arzobispo Thabo Makgoba de la Iglesia Anglicana de África del Sur, calificó al conflicto en Gaza de “insensato e innecesario”.“Ninguno traerá la paz y la seguridad a Israel y Palestina, en particular cuando conlleva el uso despiadado de la fuerza bruta que se ha empleado en la última semana”, dijo él en un comunicado el 29 de julio, añadiendo: “únanse a los que piden que las breves suspensiones de hostilidades se conviertan en un permanente cese al fuego”.Suheil Dawani, obispo anglicano en Jerusalén, junto con los patriarcas y jefes de iglesias han pedido “a ambas partes un inmediato cese al fuego y la urgente reanudación de las conversaciones de paz”.– Matthew Davies es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Por Matthew DaviesPosted Aug 1, 2014 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Se elaboran planes para la revisión del Libro de Oración…

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] La Convención General 2015 dio un paso hacia la revisión del Libro de Oración Común de 1979 y del himnario [The Hymnal] de 1982, al instruir a la Comisión Permanente sobre Liturgia y Música (SCLM, por su sigla en inglés) que elabore planes para revisar ambos [libros] y presentarlos a la próxima Convención en Austin, Texas, en 2018.Entre otros asuntos litúrgicos, la Convención instruyó a los obispos a encontrar medios para que las congregaciones sin clero reciban la comunión, pero la Cámara de Obispos rechazó propuestas que pedían permitirles a personas no bautizadas recibir la Santa Comunión o estudiar el asunto.La Convención aprobó publicar una versión revisada de “Mujeres y hombres santos” [Holy Women, Holy Men] con todas las conmemoraciones de santos adicionales, pero dejó “Fiestas Menores y Días de Ayuno” [Lesser Feasts and Fasts”] como el calendario suplementario autorizado de las conmemoraciones de la Iglesia (véase artículo aquí).La versión revisada de Mujeres y hombres santos se llama Una gran nube de testigos [A Great Cloud of Witnesses].La Convención dispuso también el uso de lo que comúnmente se conoce como “Rito III” durante los oficios principales del domingo, con ciertas restricciones; autorizó materiales para honrar a Dios en la creación, actualizó el leccionario del Libro de Oración para ajustarlo al Leccionario Común Revisado, autorizó la continua labor en el Proyecto de Música Mundial y el apoyo al Programa de Liderazgo para Músicos que Atienden Congregaciones Pequeñas, y aprobó una revisión continua del Ritual para Ocasiones Especiales.En temas litúrgicos remitidos al comité legislativo especial sobre el matrimonio, la Convención General aprobó dos nuevas liturgias matrimoniales con lenguaje genérico neutro, que lo mismo pueden usarse con parejas del mismo sexo que de sexos opuestos, así como continuar con el uso del rito de bendición para relaciones entre personas del mismo sexo que la Convención General aprobó en 2012.Revisión del Libro de Oración y del HimnarioLa Resolución A169 instruye a la SCLM “a preparar un plan para la revisión completa” del Libro de Oración Común de 1979 y a presentarlo a la próxima Convención General. Dice que el plan debe “utilizar las riquezas de nuestra diversidad litúrgica, cultural, racial, generacional, lingüística, genérica y étnica a fin de compartir el culto común” y “tomar en consideración el uso de las actuales tecnologías que brindan acceso a una amplia gama de recursos litúrgicos”.Al preparar el plan, la SCLM “consultará con el amplio margen de la expresión y participación culturales de nuestra Iglesia”, dijo el Rdo. Devon Anderson, vicepresidente del comité legislativo del Libro de Oración, Liturgia y Música.El obispo Thomas Breidenthal, de Ohio Sur, miembro de un comité, le dijo a la Cámara de Obispos que la resolución “nos compromete a una conversación teológica, litúrgica y eclesiológica. Espero que podamos avanzar con audacia para decir que estamos listos”.“Resulta cada vez más obvio que el Libro de Oración de 1979 es un producto de su tiempo, que refleja lo mejor…de la erudición de mediados del siglo XX”, dijo la Rda. Ruth Meyers, presidenta de la SCLM, a la Cámara de Diputados. Cuarenta años después, “es hora para nosotros de hacer balance de nuestra Iglesia y su contexto en este siglo” y de prepararnos para revisar el libro de oración “para respaldar nuestra labor de evangelización y contribuir a la vitalidad y el crecimiento de nuestras congregaciones y de nuestra Iglesia”, dijo ella.Prediciendo que la resolución sería aprobada, el diputado William Murchison, de Dallas, dijo que quería advertirle a la cámara que probablemente cometa “un grave error”.“Algunos de nosotros somos lo bastante viejos, desafortunadamente, para recordar la confusión que padeció esta Iglesia durante la última revisión del libro de oración”, afirmó. “Muchos episcopales, tristemente, dejaron la Iglesia… Mi mayor preocupación, sin embargo, es que otra revisión del libro de oración, siguiendo los lineamientos incorporados en esta resolución, nos dará algo distinto al Libro de Oración Común… un libro que no ofrezca nada más una variedad de opciones”.El Rdo. Canónigo John Floberg, diputado de Dakota del Norte, secundó la resolución, pidiendo sólo que, cuando se revise el libro de oración, se ponga a disposición de personas que no hablan inglés de manera oportuna.“Entre el pueblo lakota-dakota de las planicies, toma un promedio de 40 años traducir sustancialmente el libro de oración una vez que esté revisado”, dijo. “No se olviden de nosotros”.La Convención también instruyó a la SCLM, mediante la Resolución D060 “a preparar un plan para la revisión completa del himnario [The Hymnal 1982].Durante la discusión del comité legislativo, el Rdo. Jeremiah Williamson, de Ohio, dijo estar “algo indeciso” porque él veía la necesidad de revisar el himnario pero advertía también que la SCLM tenía lo que “parece como una increíble cantidad de trabajo ahora mismo”. Cuestionó también si la elaboración de un plan para revisar el himnario era prematura, dado que estaba a punto de comenzar la planificación sobre la revisión del libro de oración.Sin embargo, el Muy Rdo. Benjamin Shambaugh, de Maine, dijo que él creía que tenía más sentido que los planes para un nuevo himnario formaran parte del proceso de planificación de un nuevo libro de oración.“Sería negligente no incluir al himnario en la mezcla”, afirmó. “Resultaría extraño no incluir la música como parte de esa discusión”.En otras resoluciones relacionadas con la música, la Convención aprobó la A060, la continuación del Equipo de Trabajo del Cántico Congregacional de la SCLM “para promover la misión de la Iglesia Episcopal mediante la animación y vigorización del cántico congregacional a través de una variedad de recursos musicales” y para desarrollar y expandir la labor del Proyecto de Música Mundial.La Convención también apoyó la A061, la continuación del Programa de Liderazgo para Músicos que Atienden Congregaciones Pequeñas.Santa Comunión y mesa abiertaVarias resoluciones relacionadas con permitir a personas no bautizadas recibir la Santa Comunión —una práctica a la que algunos se refieren como mesa o comunión abierta— fracasaron en la Cámara de Obispos.Los obispos rechazaron un intento de enmendar el Canon I.17.7, Resolución C023, para permitir a personas no bautizadas recibir la Santa Comunión si fuera “con la intención de comenzar o fortalecer una relación con Cristo y finalmente ser bautizados” y el clero proporcionara “necesario consejo” o cuando “las congregaciones que invitaran a personas no bautizadas a recibir la comunión lo hicieran como parte de un plan de evangelización para dar la bienvenida a todas las personas a la mesa de Cristo y fortalecerlas en su relación con Cristo y la Iglesia”.Los obispos rechazaron, por estrecho margen, la Resolución C010, que solicitaba un equipo de trabajo “para estudiar y facilitar el diálogo denominacional concerniente a la práctica de invitar a todas las personas, bautizadas y no bautizadas, a recibir la Santa Comunión”. La resolución fue rechazada por 79 a 77 votos, luego de que se le añadiera una enmienda en que se pedía que el equipo de trabajo “incluyera un equilibrio y diversidad de perspectivas”.Los obispos se pronunciaron en pro y en contra de la resolución, [debate] en el que algunos de sus partidarios dijeron que la legislación no era para apoyar la práctica, sino más bien para crear un equipo de trabajo como una manera adecuada de iniciar una discusión sobre el tema.Los obispos también rechazaron la Resolución A065 que instruía a la SCLM “a elaborar materiales litúrgicos sobre la iniciación cristiana”.La intención, le dijo Meyers a ENS antes de la Convención, era producir recursos litúrgicos semejantes a los materiales que la SCLM había elaborado anteriormente para la bendición de relaciones de parejas del mismo sexo que contenían ensayos así como materiales litúrgicos y pastorales.“Es importante considerar tanto la interpretación y práctica de la confirmación como su interpretación de admisión a la Comunión, todo a la luz de la teología del bautismo”, había dicho Meyers.En un asunto relacionado, la Convención remitió la Resolución C050 a la SCLM para estudiar las implicaciones teológicas de permitir que los adultos fuesen bautizados y confirmados al mismo tiempo.En otra resolución relacionada con la Comunión, la A044, la Convención General instruía a “los obispos que ejercen autoridad eclesiástica en cada diócesis a concebir y poner en práctica medios por los cuales las pequeñas congregaciones dentro de sus diócesis que no cuentan con el beneficio de un clérigo puedan recibir la Comunión de manera regular”.El texto original pedía que se facultaran a ministros laicos para distribuir, en ausencia de un clérigo, un sacramento previamente consagrado en el culto público del domingo y que un rito litúrgico acompañante se creara para tales circunstancias.El comité legislativo escuchó apasionados testimonios sobre la resolución, en algunos de los cuales describían cómo las congregaciones podían pasar extensos períodos de tiempo sin la Santa Eucaristía debido a la escasez de clero disponible.La Convención también convino, en la Resolución D050, que los obispos “que ejerzan autoridad eclesiástica” pueden permitir a las congregaciones el uso de “Un orden para celebrar la Santa Eucaristía” (LOC pp. 323-328) en un domingo principal o celebración semanal de la Santa Eucaristía, si la Plegaria Eucarística se escribe y se le presenta al obispo con antelación a su uso”.La resolución advierte que el libro de oración no prohíbe ese uso.Durante las audiencias y los debates del comité, algunos arguyeron que el uso regular de tales liturgias creativas —a veces llamadas Rito III— puede ser especialmente valioso para comunidades eclesiásticas emergentes o cuando en el culto autorizado participen niños.Como se explica aquí, “Este rito tiene la forma de un bosquejo que le permite a los participantes preparar muchos de los textos litúrgicos que se usarán en la celebración eucarística, mientras mantiene la misma estructura básica de la liturgia eucarística que se encuentra en otros ritos”.Liturgias de la creaciónLa Convención General autorizó [mediante la Resolución] A058, “Materiales litúrgicos que honran a Dios en la creación” y especificó que estaban “disponibles gratuitamente”. Instruyó a la SCLM a consideran la inclusión de los materiales en una versión revisada del Ritual para Ocasiones Especiales.La Convención remitió a la SCLM la Resolución C015, que pedía autorización para añadir una sexta pregunta al Pacto Bautismal “concerniente a nuestra responsabilidad como cristianos bautizados por el cuidado de la creación de Dios”.Ritual para Ocasiones EspecialesLa Convención General aprobó la Resolución A059, que instruía a la SCLM a continuar trabajando en la revisión del Ritual para Ocasiones Especiales.La Convención también instruyó a la SCLM, con la [Resolución] D036, a incluir un rito para el cambio del nombre de una persona en la revisión del Ritual para Ocasiones Especiales. Durante las audiencias, varias personas —especialmente miembros de la comunidad de transexuales— testificaron apasionadamente acerca de la importancia de ese rito.Y la Convención remitió a la SCLM la Resolución D046, que pide autorización para el uso experimental “o para uso en sesiones especiales de estudio”, con el permiso del obispo diocesano, de materiales y oraciones litúrgicas del libro All Desires Known [Todos los deseos conocidos] de Janet Morley y a la consideración del SCLM el incluirlos en una versión revisada del Ritual para Ocasiones Especiales.Resoluciones adicionalesEntre otras decisiones relacionadas con la liturgia, la Convención General aprobó resoluciones para:Instruir a la SCLM “que continúe recogiendo, revisando y diseminando materiales que aborden el antijudaísmo expreso y mezclado en porciones de las Escrituras y de textos litúrgicos cristianos, A063.Adoptar criterios para recomendar traducciones de la Biblia para el culto público, A063.Revisar, en una segunda lectura, el leccionario del Libro de Oración Común para avenirlo con el Leccionario Común Revisado, adaptado previamente como el leccionario autorizado de la Iglesia, A067, yInstruir a la SCLM a comenzar a trabajar en la traducción del libro de oración u otros recursos litúrgicos autorizados, o todos ellos, al francés, el creole y el español, A068.— Sharon Sheridan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Liturgy & Music Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY General Convention 2015, Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ General Convention, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Tags Se elaboran planes para la revisión del Libro de Oración y del Himnario La Convención General rechaza resoluciones sobre comunión abierta Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Por Sharon SheridanPosted Jul 6, 2015 Rector Hopkinsville, KY last_img read more

Church of England’s first female diocesan bishop releases film to…

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Women’s Ministry Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Posted Mar 9, 2017 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [Anglican Communion News Service] Bishop Rachel Treweek, the Church of England’s first female diocesan bishop has spoken of her hope of helping women ex-offenders rebuild their lives and self-esteem in a new short film recorded to mark International Women’s Day earlier this week.Full article. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Anglican Communion, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Church of England’s first female diocesan bishop releases film to help ex-offenders Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more